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Do you need a DSLR?

oFlamingo 3,855 September 27, 2012 at 03:09 PM
So you have a camera phone and from time to time, you bring your 12-megapixel point and shoot digital camera that you got for $150 on Slickdeals. A couple of times a week though, you see these larger, professional-looking cameras called DSLR’s that everyone seems to go gaga about. So you’re curious - do you actually need a DSLR? Is the picture quality that important for you to invest hundreds if not thousands on this new toy? If you’ve ever asked yourself these questions, here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know about DSLRs.


Practical Difference between Point-and-Shoot and DSLRs

A point-and-shoot camera is the compact digital device that elementary schoolers now get as Christmas presents. It’s usually under an inch thick and has a large digital screen where you see the image you’re about to take. Point and shoots have one irreplaceable built-in lens and are generally smaller, lighter and more portable than DSLR’s.

“DSLR” stands for digital single-lens reflex (camera). These are the bigger, bulkier cameras that professional photographers and enthusiasts use. DSLRs have interchangeable lenses depending on your needs, which makes them very adaptable for different situations. This means that if you’re shooting close-ups, you can use a specific lens that will produce the best image for the situation. Likewise, if you’re shooting landscapes, you can switch to a wide-angle lens to capture the image in its entirety.

Technical difference between Compact and DSLRs

A regular compact camera uses two lenses to capture an image. One lens goes to the image recorder (either film or flash memory) while the other goes from the physical lens to the viewfinder. This duality works fine when shooting at mid-range distances (optimal range for the built-in lens), but once you want to capture an image close-up or in wide angle, the image you see on the viewfinder doesn’t accurately reflect what’s being captured.

With an “SLR” (single-lens reflex), there is a mirror and prism mechanism that allows a photographer to see the actual reflection of the image that’s about to be captured with only one lens. Up until 3 or 4 years ago, you had to look through a physical viewfinder to see the image you want to capture with a DSLR and then use digital screen only to preview the photo. Newer DSLRs now have the capability of showing you a preview of the image on the screen before taking the picture.

So...do you need a DSLR?

DSLRs are far more powerful than regular point-and-shoot compact cameras. If taking pictures were the same as computing, the point-and-shoot and DSLR difference is comparable to owning a tablet and a computer. A point-and-shoot will do fine if you’re taking pictures of people who pose for a camera and are always in brightly lit areas, but if you’re capturing movement, unpredictable emotions or milestones, we definitely recommend investing in a DSLR. Image quality is far more superior with an SLR than with a regular point and shoot. Vibration Reduction (VR)/Image Stabilization (IS) lenses produce sharper images due to reduced noise. Having interchangeable lenses lets you find the ideal kinds for specific situations, and the ability to add a flash, use a remote trigger and a number of professional accessories are just some of the DSLR benefits.

Going back to the computing analogy however, if you only need to get on the Internet to check Slickdeals and your email everyday, it makes more sense just to get a tablet than a computer. Bringing the analogy to photography, if you don’t particularly enjoy taking pictures, then maybe sticking with your camera phone is sufficient.

Before you buy...

If we’ve managed to convince you that you do in fact need a DSLR (and not all of you do), here are a few things to consider before making your first purchase:

Brand Consciousness

Unlike most point-and-shoot cameras, brand is actually very important when it comes to DSLRs. The best lenses are usually exclusive to the brand, so when you buy a Canon camera body, you are most likely going to get Canon lenses. The same goes with Nikon, Sony or Panasonic. There are a few brand-agnostic manufacturers (e.g. Sigma, Tamron) who provide the same types of lenses across brands, which may have a few gems in their lineups. Adapters are available to switch from one to the other, but most camera enthusiasts would warn you to stay away from them. The two largest and most popular brands of DSLRs are Canon and Nikon and though there’s a premium for the brand, the accessibility of deals and lenses for these two are worth the initial investment. For Slickdeals in particular, we’ve seen a number of Canon deals on our front page, usually 10-20% cheaper than Nikon ones, and considerably cheaper than Sony and Panasonic.


Recent Slickdeals on DSLR packages


Canon EOS Rebel T4i *Live*
18-135mm STM Lens
PIXMA Pro 9000 Mark II Photo Printer
32 GB memory card
$894 after $400 rebate

Canon EOS Rebel T3i
18-55mm Lens
PIXMA Pro 9000 Mark II Photo Printer
Gadget bag
Replacement battery
$624 after $400 rebate

Canon EOS Rebel T3
18-55mm Lens
EF 75-300mm Lens
EF-S 55-250mm Lens
PIXMA Pro 9000 Mark II Photo Printer
UV Filter
50-pack Photo Paper
$487 after $400 rebate

Nikon D3100
18-55mm VR Lens
$400

Lenses

The most important thing to remember here is that your shot will only be as good as your lens. Even the cheapest DSLR paired up with a good lens can produce images that will trounce a $5,000 camera with a mediocre lens on it. Quality lenses also keep their value should you ever decide that you are tired of swapping them (and get rid of the whole setup).

On the technical side, the Focal Length is a measure of distance where an image focuses. The magic number for camera lens focal length is 50mm. This is the distance where magnification is the same as that of normal vision’s. When a lens is less than 50mm, it’s considered a wide-angle lens and sees more than the eye can see. This would be ideal for landscapes and longshots. Lenses longer than 50mm are telephoto lenses, ideal for capturing close ups and focusing on specific targets.

Most camera starter kits come with an 18-55 lens and many brands have lineups that can complement the kit, such as the Canon 55-250mm or Nikkor 55-200mm as beginner zoom lens.


Recent Slickdeals on Lenses

Image from: http://one.nikonusa.com/V1.aspx

Canon EF 24-105mm $780
Canon EF-S 18-200mm $399
Canon EF-S 55-250mm $240

Accessories

You can buy your accessories as you build your collection, but the one thing you’ll need off the bat is a reliable camera case. It would be a shame to lose a $500 investment because of a $10 case. The neoprene covers are fine if you’re planning on keeping your camera within a sturdier bag, otherwise, it’s best to get a thick name-brand bag that will protect your camera and carry your lenses through events like picnics, graduations and hikes. An immediate second on the list would be a multi-coated UV filter to make images sharper and to protect the lens from dust and scratches.

Cheat Sheet

If you need a quick reference to the pros and cons of point and shoots vs. DSLR's, take a look at chart below:




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If you have ever wondered about anything on Slickdeals, please send a PM to oFlamingo with the subject line, “News & Articles”.

57 Comments

1 2 3 4
Joined Feb 2008
L2: Beginner
24 Reputation
#31
I am not a professional photographer and the only photos I take are of my family or of the vacation we go on. I was frustrated with the quality of photographs taken by my not so shabby Panasonic DMZ, so I plonked some money for Canon T3i.
Spent a month going thru online tutorials and fiddling with the aperture/ shutter settings. I get much better pictures now - in terms of exposure and closer to life rather than washed out or underexposed and blurry pictures.
Yes, i still use auto mode sometimes when I am indoors and in a hurry to capture that moment. And that comes out gorgeous! No comparison with my P&S.
My advise - if you can afford it, and are not bothered by the size of it - go for it! I spent under $600 for a good body and 2 medium lenses, thanks to SD.
Extremely pleased with my purchase so far!
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Joined Feb 2011
L2: Beginner
16 Reputation
#32
Quote from mannym View Post :
OK. One needs to learn lighting, aperture, shutter speed and focal length to take a decent pictures with DSLR. Can you share what will be the best setting (focal length, aperture, shutter speed, ISO or program modes) for the following common situations:
1. Indoor party in a restaurant or living room with incandescent lighting with the subject within five feet
2. Close up shots of flowers, humming birds in an outdoor setting with moderate day lighting at a distance ten to fifteen feet
3. Fireworks show on July 4th
4. Outdoor group photos/portraits with historic monuments or background
5. Sporting events
6. Kids and toddlers in a indoor living room situation

Please share your thougths
Depends on your lens but here is what I would say would be a good setup with some common lenses.. i'm not a pro and am just starting out so i post this hoping others will correct me and maybe i'll learn something too!

Here is what I'd use with my Canon 60D (hand held)
1. Indoors. 17-55 Canon F2.8 (or Tamron 17-50 F2.8). no flash. ISO between 400-1000. Aperture F2.8. Focal length probably around 17 for waist-up or 30-40mm for a shoulders up. Shutter speed could vary with the focal length. You can go somewhere between 1/20 - 1/50th of a second.

2. Outdoors. If you want close ups from 10-15 ft you'd need a zoom lens here. I have a 70-300 f/3.5 - 5.6 that works good outdoors in bright lighting.

3. Fireworks. I have trouble on these mainly getting auto focus to hit the right spot so using manual focus helps. This year I got some decent shots using my 17-50 f/2.8 tamron lens. I couldn't zoom in real close, but you don't really need to for a larger fireworks display if you are relatively close. (I was at a baseball game watching the fireworks so they were pretty big in the sky from where I sat.) --- f/2.8 helps here with grabbing a lot of light at lower ISO (less noise). But I'd have to mess with it and test a few shots before I could get the settings right. Maybe 1000 ISO with f/2.8. This would also depend on how much motion you want to capture too. Tough one for sure.

4. Outdoor Group. Good range is good here .. travel lens comes to mine (18-200) for outdoor shots with group closeups (wide) and distant monuments you want to zoom in on.

5. Kids indoors. This is where the prime lens comes in.. I have a 30mm Sigma f/1.4 that I love love love indoors with the 4 month old. I can shoot all day in low light with no flash and low ISO and I can grab so much light. 30mm; f/1.4 - 2.0; 1/20 - 1/40; ISO ??. I cheat with the 60D and set everything in manual except the ISO.. so I'm not real good at that yet -- I'd have to test some out and adjust.. trial and error, but I'm still learning.
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Joined Mar 2005
Cool Kid Wannabe
382 Reputation
#33
I read this thread and substituted "DSLR" for Lexus, Mercedes, Infiniti, Acura, BMW, and "point & shoot" for Toyota, Chrysler, Nissan, Honda, Hyundai, Ford, Chevy.

Most of the info and replies still seem to make sense.

Very rarely have I seen a person that really "needs" a more expensive car.....but then again I've never really concerned myself with how other people spend their money!
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Joined Aug 2011
L6: Expert
520 Reputation
#34
It's all relative. Spend some time in an area that is characterized by poverty and you'll quickly realize that many people don't NEED a lot of the stuff that we buy.

The question comes down to: do you WANT a dslr camera? If you want to learn something new, want to have the experience of using this technology for your purposes, or just want to have one to fulfill whatever motivations you have - then do what you're going to do.

We all benefit from the fervor of our own subjective opinion. Many of these posts are both helpful, but also self-serving - reinforcing the self-identity of each poster, their sense of purpose, etc. After all, people define themselves but what they do or what they have (not always, but mostly). Whether it's a camera, a car, or a trip to another place, it's similar to any other experience in life - if you want to have the experience, then count up the costs, make your decision, and do your thing.
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Joined Jan 2009
L3: Novice
37 Reputation
#35
Quote from MaqAttaq View Post :
I'm not a pro photographer, but I do agree that most don't need to bother having a DSLR. I'm a major proponent of learning on some of the more advanced P&S (gateway) cameras (such as the older Canon PowerShot A series or some of the newer PowerShot SX Series). I would get studio-quality shots (with the right lighting and settings) with my old 4 megapixel Powershot A80 than some people can get with their DSLRs. Plus, my A80 had some functionality that mirrors a DSLR (like Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, full manual, etc.). Once I learned how to use those functions, I was able to push it to the max. It was then that I upgraded to a DSLR. Now, I don't use full auto unless I'm using it to get a vague baseline for manual settings.

It always amazes me how many have DSLRs and just use them as they would a P&S, complete with the built-in flash, and looking at their pictures, they look far worse than what I would've taken with my old A80 camera. Actually, I've taken better photos with my cell phone camera than they did with their $1000 DSLR.
I would agree with your post despite fear that I may come across as pompous, elitist or self-serving Smilie

The reality is that plenty of people have the money to burn and they think they can magically take great pictures if they invest in this gear. And the manufacturers pursue these kind of people with equal fervor as they do with the pro's.

I don't think taking good pictures thru a D-SLR is rocket science though. But it takes considerable time, patience and effort to understand how to get good pictures and there are no short cuts there. The end result can be very rewarding though.

A big shout-out for the A-80 P&S!! A great camera and that was my introduction to the basics of Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO Smilie
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Joined Oct 2008
L6: Expert
457 Reputation
#36
Quote from oFlamingo View Post :
Technical difference between Compact and DSLRs

A regular compact camera uses two lenses to capture an image. One lens goes to the image recorder (either film or flash memory) while the other goes from the physical lens to the viewfinder. This duality works fine when shooting at mid-range distances (optimal range for the built-in lens), but once you want to capture an image close-up or in wide angle, the image you see on the viewfinder doesn’t accurately reflect what’s being captured.
I don't think this is accurate any more. While there are still some compact digital cameras that still have an optical viewfinder, it's largely gone extinct in favor of the LCD viewfinder. In modern P&S digital cameras, the LCD viewfinder accuracy is at or near 100%.
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Joined May 2008
L1: Learner
10 Reputation
#37
Quote from bugsnest View Post :
I would agree with your post despite fear that I may come across as pompous, elitist or self-serving Smilie

The reality is that plenty of people have the money to burn and they think they can magically take great pictures if they invest in this gear. And the manufacturers pursue these kind of people with equal fervor as they do with the pro's.

I don't think taking good pictures thru a D-SLR is rocket science though. But it takes considerable time, patience and effort to understand how to get good pictures and there are no short cuts there. The end result can be very rewarding though.

A big shout-out for the A-80 P&S!! A great camera and that was my introduction to the basics of Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO Smilie
I really don't think you sound elitist. The whole point of having features like interchangeable lenses, add-on flashes, and having the SLR itself is to allow better composing of images.

By composing, I mean visualizing what you want to have the picture look like, instead of simply pointing the camera and hitting the shutter release button. The more you do it, the better you do get at composing on the fly, even when you have to change lenses or camera settings.

I took the attached image below just now with my Rebel T4i. It was done rather quickly in Aperture priority from where I'm sitting... auto ISO (to get a faster shutter speed since I'm kinda shaded where I'm at). Basically, I saw the image, and went for it.

I still have my A80... just no batteries for it at the moment Stick Out Tongue. The T4i is my 2nd DSLR, having traded in my XSi with its 18-55mm kit lens to get the newer one with the 18-135mm STM lens, which I must say is far better than the regular kit lens. I found the T4i is better with night shots, plus I have the 1080p 24fps video handy.

EDIT: Added similar shot from my PowerShot A80 (raided the batteries out of my Speedlite flash for a moment) just to make a point about composing an image. It has "a80" at the end of the filename. I must say it was actually harder to compose, but I did it.
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Joined Mar 2012
DADDY WARBUCKS
120 Reputation
#38
Quote from kruiser View Post :
I am not a professional photographer and the only photos I take are of my family or of the vacation we go on. I was frustrated with the quality of photographs taken by my not so shabby Panasonic DMZ, so I plonked some money for Canon T3i.
Spent a month going thru online tutorials and fiddling with the aperture/ shutter settings. I get much better pictures now - in terms of exposure and closer to life rather than washed out or underexposed and blurry pictures.
Yes, i still use auto mode sometimes when I am indoors and in a hurry to capture that moment. And that comes out gorgeous! No comparison with my P&S.
My advise - if you can afford it, and are not bothered by the size of it - go for it! I spent under $600 for a good body and 2 medium lenses, thanks to SD.
Extremely pleased with my purchase so far!
I had a Panasonic SD-9 HD Camcorder that I rarely used.
Sold it a year or so ago for $200.

Ive been eyeing the T4i due to 1080p recording & its a DSLR.
Ive never owned a DSLR, but I take a ton of pics with my iPhone 5 of my kids & family.
Just having a DSLR & better pics would be worth ANY investment to me.

Sure Ill still use my Iphone 5 for quick moments, but for family vacations, bbq's, parties etc - I could bring the T4i & be set.

it also helps that I have brand new canon 255-250mm & 70-300mm lenses at my house Smilie
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Joined Oct 2008
L6: Expert
457 Reputation
#39
I've been thinking about buying something nicer as well, I have a 3yr old Canon SD780IS P&S which I do use frequently for eBay photos and documenting projects, but not much else because even though it's quite compact, I don't carry it with me. Quick candid snaps on the go are taken with my iPhone. Carrying around an extra device is just not convenient, no matter what it's size.

Since even my little P&S only gets used for pre-planned shots where I have plenty of time to compose and experiment, I've been thinking - with size not a concern for what I use it for, why not replace it with something better? It obviously takes much better pics than an iPhone, but the vast majority of pics I take with my SD780IS are in its very rudimentary "manual" mode. I've found I really miss being able to play around with shutter speed and aperture like I used to in my 35mm SLR days.

Like a lot of people, I've become very accustomed to using LCD viewfinders and never use the optical despite my P&S camera having it. Mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras have caught my attention, since they can use the same optics and have the same sensor as a DSLR, but without the SLR mirror mechanism that I'd probably never use. The Canon EOS M is supposed to be like a T4i, sans SLR mirror mechanism, optical viewfinder, and built-in flash. Unfortunately, I find the lack of built-in flash to be rather inconvenient, but maybe it will show up in future generation cameras. On the other hand, it's a lot easier to find a deal on a T4i, and if it's possible to get a T4i cheaper, there's really no point in getting the EOS M.
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Joined Jan 2009
L3: Novice
37 Reputation
#40
Quote from MaqAttaq View Post :
I really don't think you sound elitist. The whole point of having features like interchangeable lenses, add-on flashes, and having the SLR itself is to allow better composing of images.

By composing, I mean visualizing what you want to have the picture look like, instead of simply pointing the camera and hitting the shutter release button. The more you do it, the better you do get at composing on the fly, even when you have to change lenses or camera settings.

I took the attached image below just now with my Rebel T4i. It was done rather quickly in Aperture priority from where I'm sitting... auto ISO (to get a faster shutter speed since I'm kinda shaded where I'm at). Basically, I saw the image, and went for it.

I still have my A80... just no batteries for it at the moment Stick Out Tongue. The T4i is my 2nd DSLR, having traded in my XSi with its 18-55mm kit lens to get the newer one with the 18-135mm STM lens, which I must say is far better than the regular kit lens. I found the T4i is better with night shots, plus I have the 1080p 24fps video handy.

EDIT: Added similar shot from my PowerShot A80 (raided the batteries out of my Speedlite flash for a moment) just to make a point about composing an image. It has "a80" at the end of the filename. I must say it was actually harder to compose, but I did it.

Man that A80 is something else isn't it?? Sadly mine broke (my own fault!) and I replaced it with a SD 870IS and hated it for not having a view finder nor a swivel LCD or any manual option! I went with the 870 IS for convinience (read WAF) but felt it was a step back from my A 80!
I guess that was a good thing since it expedited my journey to a D-SLR. I now have the 60D and in some ways it reminds me of my A80 (perhaps the the swivel LCD Big Grin)

I hear ya about composition! To me understanding the "technical aspects" of a camera - which is controlling ISO, adjusting white balance, leveraging on your various AF points and varying your aperture and shutter speed to get the right exposure and action - is the easy part. It took me some time to figure out some of this and I am still learning..... but it's the "artistic aspect" of composition that's both frustrating and rewarding at the same time. That's a journey of a lifetime and it comes from within....

Have fun shooting away!
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Joined Jan 2009
L3: Novice
37 Reputation
#41
Quote from DonRSD View Post :
I had a Panasonic SD-9 HD Camcorder that I rarely used.
Sold it a year or so ago for $200.

Ive been eyeing the T4i due to 1080p recording & its a DSLR.
Ive never owned a DSLR, but I take a ton of pics with my iPhone 5 of my kids & family.
Just having a DSLR & better pics would be worth ANY investment to me.

Sure Ill still use my Iphone 5 for quick moments, but for family vacations, bbq's, parties etc - I could bring the T4i & be set.

it also helps that I have brand new canon 255-250mm & 70-300mm lenses at my house Smilie
I may have been in a similar situation like you before I purchased my first D-SLR. The idea of taking good images of kids and the added benefit of a 1080p Video recording option with the same device sounds great on paper.

Now cut to 3 years later what I have found is, I have got good at taking pictures and upgraded to a 60D and some good glass. I have been taking LOTS of pictures but my video recording habits on the D-SLR have gone down to 0.
I don't think it has anything to do with the camera itself but the reality is it's cumbersome to shoot video with a D-SLR and takes some getting used to. Camcorders are designed to do just that so we continue lugging that around (my wife also prefers using the camcorder than dealing with trying to manually re-focus with the D-SLR). That's just our experience though.....
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Joined Feb 2010
L2: Beginner
120 Reputation
#42
What a crap article. It's almost all confusing, misleading, or outright wrong. Where can I buy this UV filter that'll make all my pictures sharper?
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Joined Nov 2010
L4: Apprentice
260 Reputation
#43
Just recently upgraded to DSLR (1 year). Before upgrading, I had trouble with P&S photo quality. Didn't seem to matter how much I spent or what features I used, I constantly got grainy, blown out photos and video from them.

Got in on a YMMV clearance at Target for the Nikon D3000. My wife started complaining about not being able to record video, until she saw the photos I shot of my kids on the soccer field the next day (sunny at noon, outdoors, 20-ish yards away). They've been cropped, re-sized and printed, something we never did with photos from the P&S.

She missed video recording enough, she got a little Sony "bloggie" thing that only does video (and limited photos). For the $300 we've invested in our entry level kit and missing features, it's been worth it.

One thing people don't mention is the manual focus option, AND the shutter speeds. Manual focus has let me take pictures for my website (pictures of buttons, that auto focus wouldn't adjust for). and the ability to install a class 10 SD card and take rapid fire pictures to make SURE I got a good picture of the kids.

I know I'm not the best photographer, hell, I'm still just using the 15-55 kit lens... BUT, I know my pictures are going to be better than the guy with a phone, ipad, ipod, or P&S getting in my way. To avoid "GWC" syndrome, I usually take my photos a little zoomed out, planning to crop... and I stay out of the way of other DSLR's... I'll let them take their own good pictures.

My childcare person got a Canon T3 a few months after me, and her pictures are good, but she doesn't quite understand composing shots. She constantly takes pictures "from the hip" which just turns out odd and unappealing angles. Despite her having better glass My photos are better. -(she's got high end primes, compaired to my 15-55 kit lens)
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Joined Mar 2012
DADDY WARBUCKS
120 Reputation
#44
Quote from bugsnest View Post :
I may have been in a similar situation like you before I purchased my first D-SLR. The idea of taking good images of kids and the added benefit of a 1080p Video recording option with the same device sounds great on paper.

Now cut to 3 years later what I have found is, I have got good at taking pictures and upgraded to a 60D and some good glass. I have been taking LOTS of pictures but my video recording habits on the D-SLR have gone down to 0.
I don't think it has anything to do with the camera itself but the reality is it's cumbersome to shoot video with a D-SLR and takes some getting used to. Camcorders are designed to do just that so we continue lugging that around (my wife also prefers using the camcorder than dealing with trying to manually re-focus with the D-SLR). That's just our experience though.....
Very interesting.
The reason I want the video in the DSLR is because I dont want to have to lug around a dedicated camcorder & the DSLR to say Disney World or even the zoo.
Id rather take ONE device (DSLR) and be able to do everything from it.
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Joined Nov 2005
L1: Learner
10 Reputation
#45
Quote from BargainBob View Post :
90% of people buying SLRs have no business buying these cameras. They are not professionals, they do not even know how to use anything other than auto mode, which defeats the purpose.

These cameras are big, bulky, not practical to carry around, and no one wants to be farking with shutter speeds and aperture when taking a birthday picture.

Do yourself and your wallet a favor buy buying a regular camera.

I just hate the average slugs who buy these cameras and think they're hot shit for owning one because they were told its "the best" when realistically they don't know wtf they're doing and have no business owning one.
You know what I hate: People like you who troll comment boards. I am one of the average folks who have tried to learn photography and in no way think I am "hot shit" for having a certain camera,

As for you, you have no business existing with an attitude like yours!
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