Welcome to the updated Slickdeals redesign beta. Learn more and give us feedback. Or, return to the classic view.

Search in
Join the Slickdeals Special Olympics World Games Fundraising Team Support the World Games
Forum Thread

what is "preferred IP address" in Vista / Windows 7?

cheap_bastid 605 February 1, 2009 at 12:45 AM
I've been experiencing strange DHCP / IP problems in Vista / Windows 7.

Occasionally I am not able to change IP addresses when connecting via ethernet, and when I look at IPCONFIG I see the IPv4 address (eg 192.168.0.113) with the words "preferred".

When I see that, Vista / Windows 7 is unable to pick up new IP addresses when I do a IP address release / renew.

Anyone know what the "preferred" next to the IP address means??Confused
Add a Comment Sorry, this thread is closed.

9 Comments

1

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#2
Quote from cheap_bastid View Post :
I've been experiencing strange DHCP / IP problems in Vista / Windows 7.

Occasionally I am not able to change IP addresses when connecting via ethernet, and when I look at IPCONFIG I see the IPv4 address (eg 192.168.0.113) with the words "preferred".

When I see that, Vista / Windows 7 is unable to pick up new IP addresses when I do a IP address release / renew.

Anyone know what the "preferred" next to the IP address means??Confused
Don't know what the "preferred" references, but, you aren't getting a new IP address because the DHCP lease hasn't expired on the router.

You might be able to flush the leases via the router config pages or try power cycling the router.

That or just set your IP address manually (be sure you know the details first.)
Helpful Comment? 0 0
#3
Quote from cheap_bastid View Post :
I've been experiencing strange DHCP / IP problems in Vista / Windows 7.

Occasionally I am not able to change IP addresses when connecting via ethernet, and when I look at IPCONFIG I see the IPv4 address (eg 192.168.0.113) with the words "preferred".

When I see that, Vista / Windows 7 is unable to pick up new IP addresses when I do a IP address release / renew.

Anyone know what the "preferred" next to the IP address means??Confused
total guess:
could it be an IP from you preferred wireless network taking precedence?
Helpful Comment? 0 0
#4
I believe that network adapter ports can be assigned multiple IP addresses and one of the IP addresses is assigned as the "preferred" IP address. Cool If you only have one IP address, it is by default the "preferred" IP address.
Helpful Comment? 0 0
#5
There are multiple DNS ips that you can connect to. The one at the top of the list is your preferred.
Helpful Comment? 0 0
#6
Quote from bhaberle View Post :
There are multiple DNS ips that you can connect to. The one at the top of the list is your preferred.
From the OP's description, this is in the output of ipconfig. So this has nothing to do w/ DNS.


Looks like the term indicates some state about the address. More info below.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-u...26952.aspx

States of an IPv6 Address
IPv6 hosts typically automatically configure IPv6 addresses by interacting with a router and performing stateless IPv6 address autoconfiguration. After being verified as unique, autoconfigured addresses are in one or more of the following states:

Valid An address for which uniqueness has been verified and from which unicast traffic can be sent and received. Autoconfigured addresses have a valid lifetime assigned by the router.

Preferred A valid address that can be used for new communications. Autoconfigured addresses also have a preferred lifetime assigned by the router.

Deprecated A valid address that cannot be used for new communications. Existing communication sessions can still use a deprecated address.

Invalid An address for which a node can no longer send or receive traffic. An address enters the invalid state after the valid lifetime expires.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-u...27003.aspx

Autoconfigured Address States
Autoconfigured addresses are in one or more of the following states:

Tentative

The address is in the process of being verified as unique. Verification occurs through duplicate address detection.

Valid

An address from which unicast traffic can be sent and received. The valid state covers both the preferred and deprecated states. The Router Advertisement message includes the amount of time that an address remains in the valid state. The valid lifetime must be greater than or equal to the preferred lifetime.

Preferred

An address for which uniqueness has been verified. A node can send and receive unicast traffic to and from a preferred address. The Router Advertisement message includes the period of time that an address can remain in the tentative and preferred states.

Deprecated

An address that is still valid but whose use is discouraged for new communication. Existing communication sessions can continue to use a deprecated address. A node can send and receive unicast traffic to and from a deprecated address.

Invalid

An address for which a node can no longer send or receive unicast traffic. An address enters the invalid state when the valid lifetime expires.
Helpful Comment? 0 0
I hate mail in rebates
605 Reputation
Original Poster
#7
Thanks for the info. yes, I was on a corporate network in which my PC would not release the IP address it first acquired, even if I moved to different ethernet connections.

Even after a IPCONFIG /release and /renew, it would stubbornly cling on to the first IP address it acquired.

I had to put in a fixed IP address to get a new IP address. This was a problem because the first IP address the PC acquired was on a subnet that did not have access to certain network resources. Only after putting in a fixed IP address could I get the network shares.

It is very frustrating to try to deal with, because Windows XP would simply renew the IP address with whatever new IP address was available, instead of stubbornly clinging on to an old IP address.

I guess XP is still far better than Vista and Windows 7. I would hate to see XP go away.
Helpful Comment? 0 0
#8
Did you try disabling the network adapter and then re-enabling it to see if it grabs DHCP info properly? My girlfriend's work computer seems to have this problem. When she brings it home, she always has to disalbe the wifi adapter then re-enable it and it gets the proper IP address for my network. Otherwise, it stays with her company's DHCP network info.
Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

I hate mail in rebates
605 Reputation
Original Poster
#9
This was a problem with the ethernet connection. My wireless was disabled.

I don't recall if I disabled the LAN connection or not. I think I did a "repair" on it, which didn't help.
Helpful Comment? 0 0
#10
Try the following method first:

Also trying assigning a static IP address
restart your computer
Then try re-enabling yourself as DHCP .

If that doesn't work u should take a look at your tcp/ip settings and see what your settings are if you haven't yet.

While your there, another method is to:
go to your TCP/Ip settings
change your protocol and make netbios the default protocol
then make sure your firewall is disabled
Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 1 of 1
1
Sorry, this thread is closed.
Add a Comment
 

Featured Coupons & Discounts

Extra 30% Off All Sale Styles Use Coupon Code: 30SUMMER
134 Redemptions at Levi's
Buy 1 Year Get 1 Free 1492 Redemptions at PureVPN
$5 Off Orders Over $50 + Free Shipping Use Coupon Code: SEARS5OFF50
48347 Redemptions at Sears
Slickdeals Price Tracker
Saving money just got easier.
Start Tracking Today
Copyright 1999 - 2015. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / DMCA Notice  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)