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Best Solution for Internal Engine Cleaning and Maintenance?

udoobu 1,168 July 12, 2010 at 08:32 PM
Okay I figure there are a lot of Gearheads who might have good insight in the most cost effective, safest, and effective method to go about cleaning the inside of an engine.
I bought the car used and been changing my own oil when I got the time. After some shaddy experience at quicky lube places, I just do it myself.

My Problem is that after minutes of putting new oil, it turns black. Need to clean the inside of my engine, noticing alot of sludge. I know to stay away from engine flushes from those shitty quicky lube places.
My car is a
1999 Toyota Corolla
131,000 miles
I use Penzoil Conventional 10W-30 (5W-30 is the manufacturer recommended but since my car has high mileage, I was told to use a higher weight)
I just started using Marvel mystery oil and shockingly saw a slight performance difference in the car (picking up smoother, less sound).
There is this one product I found called Auto-RX but I am still skeptical. Anybody use it? I also know that using synthetic oil with the addictive like Mobil 1 will clean out the engine.

Any Help or input is much appreciated!
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13 Comments

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#2
Just keep changing the oil frequently. Use good quality engine oil, they have detergents formulated into them already. Use a good filter to capture the sludge.

Do not flush the engine with any type of additive or cleaner unless you are prepared to remove the oil pan, clean it out and remove the oil pump and replace it. All that sludge from the cleaner is going to clog it up and cause more problems.

Nothing you add to the oil is going to give any performance boost. It's all in your head. Additives can dislodge more engine destroying sludge.

I would not put synthetic oil in it unless you are driving around the north pole.
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#3
The oil turning black is a sign it's doing its job, according to Pennzoil.

Don't clean your engine with anything but SM quality oil of the right viscosity rating because any flushing chemical risks breaking off deposits that can then clog oil passages, and the chemical will remove varnish from piston rings and cylinders and turn the engine into a bad smoker that burns a lot more oil. Maybe you should check your engine's PCV system because it helps a ton to prevent build-up of sludge.

However if you can't resist the urge to use a cleaning chemical, avoid the strong ones that ruin clean out the engine in a matter of minutes, and stick to mild stuff, like a quart Rislone or even 8 oz. of ordinary Dexron transmission fluid. The latter must not be left in for more than 100 miles because it contains a lot more detergent than motor oil does. So change the oil and filter then, and change them again in another 100 miles.
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#4
The Marvell oil may have lowered the viscosity. Think about it... The higher the viscosity, the thicker and stickier the oil is. The benefit is less friction. The disadvantage is increased resistance as the engine turns. If you switch to 20w50, you'll probably notice a mileage drop. That's how it works.
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#5
Want to clean it out? After emptying out the old stuff and changing the filter run 3 quarts of cheap oil and replace it again. it's a waste of 3 quarts and $4. Then empty that and put your "good" oil in.

Thicker oil has a hard time getting in between today's tight-tolerance engines. It's also harder to pump and creates resistance of it's own. So today a new car will have a lighter oil because the parts have less space between them and the resistance is lower, making better fuel mileage.

The problem is that over time, small gaps form from the constant heating and cooling, wear and tear of parts. Just as soon as you start cleaning the oil up, you MAY unclog one of those "plugs." Next thing you know, you have an oil leak.

10w30 every 3-5k miles. Empty, filter, repeat.
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#6
Personally, I would stick with the 5W-30, but I'd also want to know where you lived first.

When I change the oil, I let it drip for a long time AND I dump a quart of new, clean oil in and let it run through (should run clear, but if it isn't put in another one). It helps flush out all the old dirty oil.

It's normal for the new oil to turn brown after a while, but if you clean it out good as mentioned above it will stay cleaner longer.

Lots of people say good things about Seafoam. At your mileage, it might be a good idea, so check into it. Having said that, I have personally never used it. I don't own a Toyota, so I don't have sludge issues.
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#7
If your car is not leaking oil, dont change the weight. Make sure your using a good filter and change it when you change the oil. Seafoam is good for cleaning out the throttle body and some of the carbon deposits.

Toyota during your cars time period had problems with engine sludge in many cars. This settlement as been expanded a few times and the link below is only a partial list http://consumeraffairs.com/news04...ement.html You may want to do some checking to see if your car was effected.
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#8
I would switch away from Penzoil and go with Castrol high mileage in the weight your owner's manual calls for.

Penzoil uses paraffin (WAX) for viscosity control, etc...

I took my truck to 408,xxx miles with Castrol High Mileage.

I also used the Toughguard Fram filters...the higher mileage ones...they have 3 different ones @ wally mart...and I got the best of the 3...cost more, but it filtered better.

@ next oil change, I'd run your car for a couple hrs to get it good and warm (have your car ramps, etc all set up) and as soon as you get home, drain the oil with the car hot as possible to get as much of the old dirty oil out.

If you have some sort of metal pick or screwdriver, etc see if you can dredge out any scum at the bottom of the oil pan.

*the idea above of putting in 1 qt with the plug still out sounds like a good idea.

I'd fill it up and go out for another drive...come back and drain it again, new filter, oil etc...

Then @ 3k change the oil again 2x and see how dirty it comes out then.
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#9
I would try this product and it seems to work for many people.
http://www.auto-rx.com/pages/heav...e_app.html

See results here

http://www.google.com/cse?cx=0182...hreads.php
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#10
I know this is about engine oil. But have you looked at the air filter? Its often forgoten.

Also a transmission change might be helpful. I change that twice. The first time, is a year into a new car, and the second time is 8-10 years or depending on what the manual says. This isn't necessary in a lot of new cars, though.
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#11
Quote from .DC. View Post :
I would switch away from Penzoil and go with Castrol high mileage in the weight your owner's manual calls for.

Penzoil uses paraffin (WAX) for viscosity control, etc...
Are you sure the paraffin in their oil is American paraffin, that is, wax, and not British paraffin, which refers to kerosene but in the case of motor oil means any conventional oil that isn't asphaltic? Some FAQs about this from Texaco: here [texlube.com]

"Myth #1 - Paraffinic oils cause engine sludge. Oils from paraffin-based crude are loaded with wax and create engine sludge. Paraffin base stocks cause sludge. "x" Brand of motor oil causes sludge, varnish and/or engine deposits. “Paraffinic” motor oils cause wax-like deposits on the underside of the oil fill cap.

Fact: There are two basic types of crude oil, naphthenic and paraffinic. Most conventional engine lubricating oils today are made from paraffinic crude oil. Paraffinic crude oil is recognized for its ability to resist thinning and thickening with temperature, as well as its lubricating properties and resistance to oxidation (sludge forming tendencies). In the refining process, the paraffinic crude oil is broken down into many different products. One of the products is wax, and others are gasoline, kerosene, lubricating oils, asphalt, etc. Virtually every oil marketer uses paraffinic base stocks in blending its engine oil products. Many people believe the term paraffinic to be synonymous with wax. Some have the misconception that paraffinic oils will coat the engine with a wax film that can result in engine deposits. This is not true. The confusion exists because paraffinic molecules can form wax crystals at low temperatures. In lubricating oils, this wax is removed in a refining process called dewaxing. Wax is a premium product obtained from crude oil, and in order to ensure that we produce the highest quality base stocks available, Havoline removes the maximum amount of wax possible during the refining process. The end result is a motor oil product formulated with premium lubricating base oil."
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#12
if you don't have oil leaks you can run full synthetic 10-30 in summer and 0-30 in winter.
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#13
Quote from larrymoencurly View Post :
Are you sure the paraffin in their oil is American paraffin, that is, wax, and not British paraffin, which refers to kerosene but in the case of motor oil means any conventional oil that isn't asphaltic? Some FAQs about this from Texaco: here [texlube.com]

"Myth #1 - Paraffinic oils cause engine sludge. Oils from paraffin-based crude are loaded with wax and create engine sludge. Paraffin base stocks cause sludge. "x" Brand of motor oil causes sludge, varnish and/or engine deposits. “Paraffinic” motor oils cause wax-like deposits on the underside of the oil fill cap.

Fact: There are two basic types of crude oil, naphthenic and paraffinic. Most conventional engine lubricating oils today are made from paraffinic crude oil. Paraffinic crude oil is recognized for its ability to resist thinning and thickening with temperature, as well as its lubricating properties and resistance to oxidation (sludge forming tendencies). In the refining process, the paraffinic crude oil is broken down into many different products. One of the products is wax, and others are gasoline, kerosene, lubricating oils, asphalt, etc. Virtually every oil marketer uses paraffinic base stocks in blending its engine oil products. Many people believe the term paraffinic to be synonymous with wax. Some have the misconception that paraffinic oils will coat the engine with a wax film that can result in engine deposits. This is not true. The confusion exists because paraffinic molecules can form wax crystals at low temperatures. In lubricating oils, this wax is removed in a refining process called dewaxing. Wax is a premium product obtained from crude oil, and in order to ensure that we produce the highest quality base stocks available, Havoline removes the maximum amount of wax possible during the refining process. The end result is a motor oil product formulated with premium lubricating base oil."
Not quite the way I heard it, but I can see that it would be a common misunderstanding.

My bro-in-law is a "wrencher" by trade, and doesn't put it in any of his rigs, so I follow suit as well.
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#14
Besides checking the pcv system(malfunction could make more sludge and dirt inside engine) i would leave it alone and just change the oil normally. You start adding cleaners/ additives to the oil and you may be asking for trouble on the engine especially with that much mileage. Oil is engineeded with detergents. We you start adding additives you through that balance out of whack and could actually hurt the motor more than you help.
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