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Piggy back wiring??

Tonedeaf 9,415 3,667 April 15, 2011 at 10:00 AM More Photobucket Deals
Mounting a TV on this wall as pictured below. Mount will go over the existing light switch as shown. Question is, can I just piggy back on this switch with wiring to put an outlet about 6-10 inches above this light switch for power to the TV? There is also power outlet below light switch on the wall towards the bottom.

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#2
I'm not trying to be a smart-ass, but I think this is one of those situations where if you don't know enough so that you have to ask the question, then you probably don't know enough to do the work correctly/safely.

I would play it safe and use the outlet, and hide the cords with something like this (as an example, not endorsement of this specific product):
http://www.amazon.com/Wiremold-CM...B0015EA3NO
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#3
should not be an issue you need to look and see how many outlets are on the current breaker. If the lower outlet is on the same circuit and you put a blank over it you will be fine, as long as it is wired correctly.

need to check the local code to see how many outlets you can have on one breaker where you live.

Most places will allow 6 at the lowest!
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#4
Quote from lebedev View Post :
I'm not trying to be a smart-ass, but I think this is one of those situations where if you don't know enough so that you have to ask the question, then you probably don't know enough to do the work correctly/safely.

I would play it safe and use the outlet, and hide the cords with something like this (as an example, not endorsement of this specific product):
http://www.amazon.com/Wiremold-CM...B0015EA3NO
Iagree

If you must do the work yourself, run the wires from the outlet, not the switch.
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#5
Thanks for the input. I am capable of wiring and have done plenty of outlets etc. Just wanted to get another opinion on my plans.

benjie, will take your advice and run the wiring from the outlet and not the switch. Thanks.

Reps to all.
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#6
Quote from Tonedeaf View Post :
Thanks for the input. I am capable of wiring and have done plenty of outlets etc. Just wanted to get another opinion on my plans.

benjie, will take your advice and run the wiring from the outlet and not the switch. Thanks.

Reps to all.
Gotcha. Are you using the other outlet for anything? If not, you shouldn't have to worry too much about overloading the circuit, as you've basically just got a dummy outlet down there doing nothing. That's probably not according to code, but realistically, it's true.

Good luck. If you've done this before, it shouldn't take too long.
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#7
What is the estimate load of the TV you're putting there (I assume it's a TV).

FWIW lights are usually wired with 14 awg and outlets with 12 awg since lights don't usually carry much current, but people will plug just about anything into a socket (ha ha ha). It may be worth fishing power from the existing plug. BTW I did the same thing for a TV mount about 6 months ago.
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#8
Quote from benjie View Post :
Gotcha. Are you using the other outlet for anything?
At this point it won't be used for anything other than a night light. DEpending on space, may need to also plug my subwoofer on that wall also.

Quote from Dr. J View Post :
What is the estimate load of the TV you're putting there (I assume it's a TV).
Not sure what the load is, it is a 58" Panasonic plasma.
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#9
Quote from Tonedeaf View Post :
At this point it won't be used for anything other than a night light. DEpending on space, may need to also plug my subwoofer on that wall also.


Not sure what the load is, it is a 58" Panasonic plasma.
I installed a 63" samsung plasma Smilie Using some rough #'s from google, it looks like a 54" panasonic plasma pulls 275W, which is 2 - 2.5A with 110V (275W/110V=2.5A) ~. Most lights will be wired for 15A (breaker) but outlets will be 15 or 20A, depending upon who wired the house. That wattage # was for a "default" setting on the TV - if it's calibrated it increases a bit to around 320W (closer to 3 A).

Rough calculations like this can save you hassle later on.

Also I am not sure if I would put a sub on the same circuit as a TV. (voltage drops?) What W is the sub?
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#10
once you dig in you might see the light is ran from the outlet. is that a dual switch or did you install a dual cover for a place to mount the remote? if its a dual switch did one go to an outlet for on/off?
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#11
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
I installed a 63" samsung plasma Smilie Using some rough #'s from google, it looks like a 54" panasonic plasma pulls 275W, which is 2 - 2.5A with 110V (275W/110V=2.5A) ~. Most lights will be wired for 15A (breaker) but outlets will be 15 or 20A, depending upon who wired the house. That wattage # was for a "default" setting on the TV - if it's calibrated it increases a bit to around 320W (closer to 3 A).

Rough calculations like this can save you hassle later on.

Also I am not sure if I would put a sub on the same circuit as a TV. (voltage drops?) What W is the sub?
Curious, why does calibrating a TV increase draw? TVs usually ship in "torch" mode with brightness turned way up and calibrating them turns it down. I would think calibration would lower power consumption.
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#12
Quote from stufine View Post :
once you dig in you might see the light is ran from the outlet. is that a dual switch or did you install a dual cover for a place to mount the remote? if its a dual switch did one go to an outlet for on/off?
The switch is a dual switch from when house was built. Originally one side was for fan, the other for light on the fan. I forget how they are wired. The remote is covering one side of the switch that is always on and controlled by the remote. The other switch is not used. Neither switches were for on/off of an outlet.
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#13
Quote from Tonedeaf View Post :
The switch is a dual switch from when house was built. Originally one side was for fan, the other for light on the fan. I forget how they are wired. The remote is covering one side of the switch that is always on and controlled by the remote. The other switch is not used. Neither switches were for on/off of an outlet.
Well the good news is that means you should have a neutral available in that box (not the case for every switch)
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#14
There is no issue with what you want to do. The kitchen is the only place where light and outlets cannot be on the same circuit. I also do not believe there are any code restrictions for the # of outlets that can do on a chain in a residential installation. Too many things plugged in and you will pop the circuit, but that is why you have the circuit.

Remember do NOT have any hidden junction boxes in the wall. Make all of your connections in the switch box and run your wire up to the new outlet.

Also I have rarely (never) seen any home installation that has different sized wire (14 vs 12) for lights vs outlets. Typically if a qualified electrician did the wiring it is 12 gauge which is rated to 20 amps. Homeowners tend to put in 14 gauge which is rated for 15 amps since it is cheaper. Just match what is already there which I suspect is 12 gauge.
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#15
Quote from redmaxx View Post :
Curious, why does calibrating a TV increase draw? TVs usually ship in "torch" mode with brightness turned way up and calibrating them turns it down. I would think calibration would lower power consumption.
yeah I agree - and what I thought, but the reference I found indicated that "calibrated" would draw more power..

source here:

http://reviews.cnet.com/green-tec...ion-chart/
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Last edited by Dr. J April 15, 2011 at 05:21 PM
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