Forum Thread

setting up a wireless repeater between routers with different firmwares

slutsky 1,438 50 November 29, 2011 at 12:41 PM
I have purchased a linksys E4200 router lately which does't have dd wrt support yet. I mean, not fully supported.

I understand that with dd wrt you can setup one router as an access point and another as a repeater. Since I am not going to flash the E4200 to dd wrt at this moment, is it possible to do the similar thing? Is there an instruction online somewhere?

linksys E4200 factory firmware
linksys WRT54GL dd wrt

Thanks

11 Comments

1

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
12,661 Posts
4,824 Reputation
Pro
#2
If the E4200 has this feature yes it can be a repeater. If not then make the E4200 your router and the 54GL your repeater (Probably what I would do anyways since the 4200 is dual band and much more expensive). Making your device a repeater is not a DD-WRT or Tomato only feature. Some stock firmwares have this.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Vague questions receive vague answers . . . . . .
Joined Dec 2006
Permanently Banned
1,438 Posts
50 Reputation
Original Poster
#3
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
If the E4200 has this feature yes it can be a repeater. If not then make the E4200 your router and the 54GL your repeater (Probably what I would do anyways since the 4200 is dual band and much more expensive). Making your device a repeater is not a DD-WRT or Tomato only feature. Some stock firmwares have this.

Not sure I understand this bridge thing:
A. Bridges
One of the ways a wireless network can be extended to another building is by using a bridge. It is best to use either a directional or semi-directional antenna on both antennas. If your router supports it, DDWRT can be used on the far end to connect to the main access point. Tomato may have this function, but I have never used it. This will allow you to use the switch ports on the wireless router that is on the far side.


Can it be setup between the two routers that I have wirelessly?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Sep 2004
L10: Grand Master
9,415 Posts
3,667 Reputation
Pro
#4
Quote from slutsky View Post :
Not sure I understand this bridge thing:
A. Bridges
One of the ways a wireless network can be extended to another building is by using a bridge. It is best to use either a directional or semi-directional antenna on both antennas. If your router supports it, DDWRT can be used on the far end to connect to the main access point. Tomato may have this function, but I have never used it. This will allow you to use the switch ports on the wireless router that is on the far side.


Can it be setup between the two routers that I have wirelessly?
Yes, your main router( I would suggest like LiquidRetro did be your E4200) will be set up as normal wireless router. The Linksys with DD-WRT you would set up as the wireless bridge. The WRT54GL bridge can be used to connect any devices to the network via LAN cable direct to the 4 ports on the back of it.

http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index....ess_Bridge
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Dec 2006
Permanently Banned
1,438 Posts
50 Reputation
Original Poster
#5
Thanks, I'll give it a try.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
12,661 Posts
4,824 Reputation
Pro
#6
Quote from slutsky View Post :
Not sure I understand this bridge thing:
A. Bridges
One of the ways a wireless network can be extended to another building is by using a bridge. It is best to use either a directional or semi-directional antenna on both antennas. If your router supports it, DDWRT can be used on the far end to connect to the main access point. Tomato may have this function, but I have never used it. This will allow you to use the switch ports on the wireless router that is on the far side.


Can it be setup between the two routers that I have wirelessly?
You are understanding it correctly. That bridge between the two is wireless. You can do it via wire too for better performance but its not necessary.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Dec 2006
Permanently Banned
1,438 Posts
50 Reputation
Original Poster
#7
What does he mean bridging traffic? File transfer? no web browsing?





The primary role of a repeater is to expand a signal from an AP to a place where you cannot pull a cable. If you can get a cable there, then simply install a new AP in Root mode, which is the normal mode for an access point. Repeaters are only meant to be used if a cable cannot be pulled because it creates a very complicated RF situation, and throughput drops significantly (as you're aware).



Understand two things about wireless signals. For one, only one wireless radio (AP or client) can talk at once in a given area. This is called half-duplex communication. The other thing to consider is that wireless devices on the same channel cause interference with each other.



Repeaters exacerbate both of these problems, because they must be on the same channel as the root AP and they can only talk if the root AP (or subsequent repeaters) aren't talking. You're geographically expanding your collision and interference domain, allowing a lot more clients to connect back to the same AP while speaking on the same channel.



So would 4 repeaters work in a daisy-chain? Maybe, for Internet surfing at least. Your throughput will be a tiny fraction of the 20Mbps or so you'd be connecting at if directly speaking to a root AP.



As for bridging, this is when APs form a link between each other and pass data. This is generally used when connecting two buildings. While Cisco allows you to configure bridges to accept clients as well, it's highly recommended that you do not allow this unless absolutely required. Bridges should be specialized for bridging traffic, not for client connectivity.

jeff.kish
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
12,661 Posts
4,824 Reputation
Pro
#8
Quote from slutsky View Post :
What does he mean bridging traffic? File transfer? no web browsing?





The primary role of a repeater is to expand a signal from an AP to a place where you cannot pull a cable. If you can get a cable there, then simply install a new AP in Root mode, which is the normal mode for an access point. Repeaters are only meant to be used if a cable cannot be pulled because it creates a very complicated RF situation, and throughput drops significantly (as you're aware).



Understand two things about wireless signals. For one, only one wireless radio (AP or client) can talk at once in a given area. This is called half-duplex communication. The other thing to consider is that wireless devices on the same channel cause interference with each other.



Repeaters exacerbate both of these problems, because they must be on the same channel as the root AP and they can only talk if the root AP (or subsequent repeaters) aren't talking. You're geographically expanding your collision and interference domain, allowing a lot more clients to connect back to the same AP while speaking on the same channel.



So would 4 repeaters work in a daisy-chain? Maybe, for Internet surfing at least. Your throughput will be a tiny fraction of the 20Mbps or so you'd be connecting at if directly speaking to a root AP.



As for bridging, this is when APs form a link between each other and pass data. This is generally used when connecting two buildings. While Cisco allows you to configure bridges to accept clients as well, it's highly recommended that you do not allow this unless absolutely required. Bridges should be specialized for bridging traffic, not for client connectivity.

jeff.kish
Now your confusing me. Are you getting this from someplace else one the web? If so use the quote tool and post a link to where you are getting this.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

Joined Dec 2006
Permanently Banned
1,438 Posts
50 Reputation
Original Poster
#9
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Now your confusing me. Are you getting this from someplace else one the web? If so use the quote tool and post a link to where you are getting this.

Sorry,
https://supportforums.cisco.com/thread/342431
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
12,661 Posts
4,824 Reputation
Pro
#10
Quote from slutsky View Post :
Sorry,
https://supportforums.cisco.com/thread/342431
Jeff is right in that post that it can cause problems, but having 4 AP's in a configuration like this is unlikely and just a poor way of setting up. But your situation is different. You are only adding one AP, and you did not say your transferring huge files all day on this network (If you are another method is better). For web surfing and simple file transfers a bridge should work fine. You would be out nothing for trying this since you have already purchased the hardware. Since you can't run wires your only other option would be Powerline adapters to simulate the Cat5 wire to add the second router via a (Wired connection) in the other part of the house. If you did this you would set the second router up as just an access point and you would not have the problems mentioned on the cisco forum. This is how large buildings such as schools make wifi networks work in the entire building.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Dec 2006
Permanently Banned
1,438 Posts
50 Reputation
Original Poster
#11
Just a quick update, I setup a client bridge between two routers wirelessly. It worked. DD wrt is a great help.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#12
I have a E4200 as well and tried using a another router as a repeater.
Gave up and bought a RE1000.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 1 of 1
1
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard