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Wired Home Network Question

rhombus_77 43 10 December 11, 2011 at 11:10 AM More Newegg Deals
I am going to attempt to wire some of the rooms in my house for a home network. I have read up in the forum and browsed some Instructables and think I have a pretty good grasp of what to do. I am primarily using the network for streaming HD content, music, computer back up and PS3. I do have some questions though.

Plan:
- 4 jacks in the TV room
- 4 in the computer room
- 2 in master bedroom
- utilize laundry room as the "data center"

What to get:
- 16 port gigabit switch Probably this one [newegg.com]
- Cheap rackmount, shelf, etc from monoprice
- 1000ft spool of Cat 6 from monoprice. I read somewhere that in-wall wire should be solid, but monoprice lists the stranded as in-wall. Which one should I use? Also, I noticed a couple different MHz ratings. Do I need to even concern myself with this?
- Keystones and plates, etc
- UPS - do I need this? Or just get a good surge protector?

Am I correct in assuming my wireless router needs to be between my modem and the switch? Or can I connect the wireless router to the switch. I ask because I have a Netgear WNR2000 Wireless-N Router, which I believe is not gigabit. Do I need to upgrade my wireless router?

As for running the wires I think I have it pretty much figured out, except one thing. 9 of the 10 wires will be run in internal walls. I want the last wire to run in an external wall. How realistic is this?

I appreciate your insight.

25 Comments

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Joined Nov 2005
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#2
i am concerned about the laundry room as the center - humidity, etc.
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#3
you can get really good coverage with E3000 or any other dual band wireless N router and dual band cards.
you can get router and card in walmart to test your speeds. you have 2 weeks to return;
I like netgear prosafe line, this should be fine or you can get this one : http://www.newegg.com/Product/Pro...6833122139. I am not sure if you really need 16 ports;
you need a router to assign ips and etc;
you can should be fine with your setup :
modem > 100 mb > router > 100 mb > switch > 1 gb > wired clients.
any communication between wired computers will be at 1 gb;

you should use solid cable for walls and stranded for patch cable; also you need to use different RJ45 for solid vs stranded
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Last edited by dude2000 December 11, 2011 at 11:32 AM
#4
I prefer putting smaller switches in places where you want multiple connections rather than running a lot of cables.

Your router needs to connect to the modem. Whether you want to think of it as between the modem and switch or just connected to the switch is irrelevant. There's no difference. It also doesn't matter that the router isn't gigabit because your wireless speeds and your modem speeds are going to be the bottleneck in and out of the router. Using gigabit just gives you extra speed between wired devices inside your home.

I would get a small ups and use it to power just the modem and wireless router. Then when power's out you can use a laptop or tablet to get internet access for several hours.
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#5
Dr. J > Humidity might be an issue. The laundry room has a fan in it. I also live in Tucson, AZ, so environmental humidity will not be an issue. I will think about putting it in a spare bedroom closet.

dude2000> I was thinking about getting a 12 port switch, but since I am going to be using 10 of the ports and I believe an additional port is used for the uplink (correct me if I am wrong), I figured a 16 would be adequate.
Do I need to assign IP addresses? I thought an unmanaged switch was pretty much plug and play. I know enough about computers to brick things, but that is about it! Although I am sure I can read up on assigning addresses.
And thanks for the insight on the setup.

Thanks guys
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#6
Samstag> thanks for clearing that up about router placement. Question about using multiple smaller switches: Say, run one ethernet cable from my main switch to the TV room where there is a mini-switch to connect my receiver, TV, PS3, etc?
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#7
with smaller switches you will have some additional overhead (network latency);

yes switch is a plug a play but you need to manage your other computers like dhcp and other network setup.
in other words you still need you router to manage network devices.

also with a lot of deceives you may need to run QOS (quality of service) like higher network priority to PS3
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#8
plug wireless into switch, make sure it is on access point mode
no cable runs longer then 328ft
get cat6 cable
gigabit switch good
get a small patch panel
label all the runs and label the jacks
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#9
Quote from rhombus_77 View Post :
Samstag> thanks for clearing that up about router placement. Question about using multiple smaller switches: Say, run one ethernet cable from my main switch to the TV room where there is a mini-switch to connect my receiver, TV, PS3, etc?
Yeah, that's how I do it. As someone else pointed out there's a tiny amount of latency added (probably a couple hundred nanosconds at most) but you'll never notice. I use 5 switches in my setup.
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#10
i would really recommend buying pre made cables. You need a very good crimper to make good connections. Sounds like you have never made your own cables before. Measure what lengths you need and add 5-10ft to each cable.
Otherwise run cable from the wall plates to a patch panel so you wont have to crimp on any connectors.
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Last edited by silenze December 11, 2011 at 03:39 PM
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#11
Quote from silenze View Post :
i would really recommend buying pre made cables. You need a very good crimper to make good connections. Sounds like you have never made your own cables before. Measure what lengths you need and add 5-10ft to each cable.
I actually have. I did a bit of modifying to an apartment I lived in. I changed out two of the cable face plates with RCA, Ethernet, Coax, and HDMI keystones. I feel fairly competent in the cable making. This new project is more sophisticated, but I think very doable.
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#12
Quote from rhombus_77 View Post :
- utilize laundry room as the "data center"
If your wireless router is in this laundry room I'm concerned about the heat that could trap inside this room on a daily basis. The humidity to fear will still be with the washer and dryer. Unless that fan exhausts all humidity out of that room then some will be left behind. Also, I'm sure this room is going to be closed half/most of the time so the enclosed walls may not be great for the wireless signal of the router. I am not saying it won't be a good signal but may be a bit dampened by the walls. Then again I'm not sure how open this laundry room is so just expressing a possible concern.

Quote from rhombus_77 View Post :
UPS - do I need this? Or just get a good surge protector?
Protect your equipment no matter what, without exception. Get a 350VA UPS for the router, and switch...APC, Tripplite, they are both good. For a little extra protection I'd would go with Wall -> Surge suppressor (1800 joules) -> UPS -> Equipment.

Quote from rhombus_77 View Post :
I was thinking about getting a 12 port switch, but since I am going to be using 10 of the ports and I believe an additional port is used for the uplink (correct me if I am wrong), I figured a 16 would be adequate.
Do I need to assign IP addresses? I thought an unmanaged switch was pretty much plug and play. I know enough about computers to brick things, but that is about it! Although I am sure I can read up on assigning addresses.
Don't worry about uplink ports as the Netgear JG516 has the Auto Uplink technology so it will detect if a port needs to be an uplink port and configure itself appropriately. So any one of those can be your uplink port. This is an unmanaged switch so there will be no configuring it with VLANs or setting an IP address for the switch itself. As you have read, it is plug and play.

Quote from rhombus_77 View Post :
Am I correct in assuming my wireless router needs to be between my modem and the switch? Or can I connect the wireless router to the switch. I ask because I have a Netgear WNR2000 Wireless-N Router, which I believe is not gigabit. Do I need to upgrade my wireless router?
As stated before, gigabit will not help you except between your LAN devices and based on the amount of cable run you plan on doing it wouldn't hurt to go with gigabit transmissions between LAN devices.

Quote from rhombus_77 View Post :
As for running the wires I think I have it pretty much figured out, except one thing. 9 of the 10 wires will be run in internal walls. I want the last wire to run in an external wall. How realistic is this?
It's possible but I would shield your cabling with PVC piping so the cables are exposed to the elements.
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#13
Thanks for the great tips menace33.
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#14
If your laundry room is properly ventilated heat should not be an issue and if it's a decent router I wouldn't worry about it. I've had an Asus 520gu running in an unventilated cabinet, on a nasty shop floor and with coolant in the air for over 1.5 years now. I would be more concerned about WiFi signal transmission to the rest of the house. When I did the setup for my folks, I had to leave the WiFi router out of the laundry room because their wiring cabinet was a steel box and running an antenna would have been a PITA.

Do not run multiple switches, it's bad design. If you are running cable anyway there is no rhyme or reason why you wouldn't pull a few extra lines when you have the cable already. The only reason to put a remote switch in is if you already have line run and you under provisioned the amount of runs needed.
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#15
A "router" needs to be the first device behind the cable modem (unless you're using the cable modem's builtin router, if it has one). But you can put wireless access points (APs) anywhere on the wired network. A wireless AP can be a dedicated device, or it can be a wireless router with most of the features turned off.

You also should be aware of "wireless bridges", they give you wired ports anywhere you have a wireless signal. They're useful when it's difficult to run wires to a location. But if you can run wire everywhere, do it.

As for switches, put them anywhere and everywhere you need to "split" the network (but the "router" still needs to be next to the modem). Using switches and running fewer cables will do lose you bandwidth* (depending on your traffic pattern), but just one Gigabit connection can serve alot of data.
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