Forum Thread

Automatically reboot to BIOS

jdmst77 1,740 1,041 May 4, 2012 at 10:13 AM
Does anyone know if there is a utility that can make a computer automatically reboot to BIOS?

If it helps, I'm running a HP Compaq 6005 Pro Microtower

11 Comments

1

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

Joined Dec 2007
L10: Grand Master
7,629 Posts
1,489 Reputation
#2
Is there a problem with just waiting for the HP splash screen and hitting either F1, F2, Del, or whichever option it states to get into the BIOS?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Dec 2008
L10: Grand Master
6,316 Posts
1,470 Reputation
#3
Bios is preboot. You cant do it.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined May 2010
L6: Expert
1,740 Posts
1,041 Reputation
Original Poster
#4
Quote from menace33 View Post :
Is there a problem with just waiting for the HP splash screen and hitting either F1, F2, Del, or whichever option it states to get into the BIOS?
Yes, I won't be around when it needs to be done. My company has scheduled power outages and if it worked, I wanted to start a auto reboot sequence to kick it into the bios, when UPC runs low, so that when the power did finally cut off, there is less of a chance that the OS will become corrupt. Then have bios set to return to previous state before power loss and my machine would be available to me remotely the next day, when I'm also not in the office.

Quote from nizzy1115 View Post :
Bios is preboot. You cant do it.
I figured as much but thanks for the confirmation. I guess I can just leave the bios setting to return to previous and hope for the best...

I thought it may be possible because on my touchpad, I use moboot as a boot loader to choose Android or WebOS. More that I think about it, that may be post bios
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by jdmst77 May 4, 2012 at 12:12 PM
Joined Jan 2006
L10: Grand Master
11,220 Posts
1,465 Reputation
#5
Quote from jdmst77 View Post :
Yes, I won't be around when it needs to be done. My company has scheduled power outages and if it worked, I wanted to start a auto reboot sequence to kick it into the bios, when UPC runs low, so that when the power did finally cut off, there is less of a chance that the OS will become corrupt. Then have bios set to return to previous state before power loss and my machine would be available to me remotely the next day, when I'm also not in the office.
Rather a clunky solution but if you can find a windows equivalent of the grub-reboot command *and* install GRUB, you could do this easily

GRUB could have two entries, one real and one fake... 'grub-reboot' to the fake entry and you'd end up with a non-booting system stuck at the GRUB prompt.

Eventually you lose power and when power is restored, it would boot the real (default) entry which would take you straight to Windows
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Heifer whines could be human cries
Closer comes the screaming knife
Joined Dec 2008
L10: Grand Master
6,316 Posts
1,470 Reputation
#6
Quote from jdmst77 View Post :
Yes, I won't be around when it needs to be done. My company has scheduled power outages and if it worked, I wanted to start a auto reboot sequence to kick it into the bios, when UPC runs low, so that when the power did finally cut off, there is less of a chance that the OS will become corrupt. Then have bios set to return to previous state before power loss and my machine would be available to me remotely the next day, when I'm also not in the office.


I figured as much but thanks for the confirmation. I guess I can just leave the bios setting to return to previous and hope for the best...

I thought it may be possible because on my touchpad, I use moboot as a boot loader to choose Android or WebOS. More that I think about it, that may be post bios
Thats just a regular boot loader. Order goes bios -> boot loader -> os
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#7
Quote from jdmst77 View Post :
Yes, I won't be around when it needs to be done. My company has scheduled power outages and if it worked, I wanted to start a auto reboot sequence to kick it into the bios, when UPC runs low, so that when the power did finally cut off, there is less of a chance that the OS will become corrupt. Then have bios set to return to previous state before power loss and my machine would be available to me remotely the next day, when I'm also not in the office.


I figured as much but thanks for the confirmation. I guess I can just leave the bios setting to return to previous and hope for the best...

I thought it may be possible because on my touchpad, I use moboot as a boot loader to choose Android or WebOS. More that I think about it, that may be post bios
chances of your os being corrupted is not "that" great for a system that is idling. And since you have a UPS why don't you just set the settings to turn it off instead of reboot?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
....


...
#8
Quote from jdmst77 View Post :
Yes, I won't be around when it needs to be done. My company has scheduled power outages and if it worked, I wanted to start a auto reboot sequence to kick it into the bios, when UPC runs low, so that when the power did finally cut off, there is less of a chance that the OS will become corrupt. Then have bios set to return to previous state before power loss and my machine would be available to me remotely the next day, when I'm also not in the office.
When you said UPC, are you talking about a UPS? If so, some UPS' can be set to turn off your computer after X amount of time, when the street power goes off, then you can remotely wake the machine up the next day with "wake on LAN".
If your UPS doesn't have that capacity, and you know the time of the scheduled power outages, you can simply schedule the machine to power down just before that moment, and again, wake it up remotely the next day with "wake on LAN".
All of this can be accomplished with Windows, or if you prefer, with after market apps.

BTW: I totally agree with you about the damage done by a hard shut down caused by power failure. It beats the heck out of a hard drive and leads to an early demise, and along the way, files can get corrupted and make the OS go a bit wonky.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
If you're on this ignore list, vivahate, sd44, cav, charles052, frogstar, godfather927 don't bother quoting me

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

Joined Mar 2007
Password: ••••••••
21,218 Posts
1,587 Reputation
#9
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
BTW: I totally agree with you about the damage done by a hard shut down caused by power failure. It beats the heck out of a hard drive and leads to an early demise
Absolutely false. Cutting the power to a spinning drive causes kinetic energy in the drive to be released into the head movement mechanism, parking the head. The heads only suffer when they're knocked around by moving the drive while it's running. The drive really is designed to park the head in this manner.

Quote :
and along the way, files can get corrupted and make the OS go a bit wonky.
Yeah, could happen. Has only happened to me once, way back in the NT 4.0 days.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Steve Gibson on password policies [grc.com]: I mean, I don't get this change it every eight weeks. ... It's not as if passwords are traveling by camel after they've been stolen, going to the bad guys, and so there's, like, some weird eight-week window, like, oh, we're going to change your password so that the stale password no longer works. ... And all this does is make IT people despised because users, who are not dumb, they think, why am I - why do I have to do this? What problem is this solving?
#10
Quote :
Cutting the power to a spinning drive causes kinetic energy in the drive to be released into the head movement mechanism, parking the head
I agree with this statement.

you should be able to use UPS and/scheduled shutdown and wake on lan
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#11
Quote :
Cutting the power to a spinning drive causes kinetic energy in the drive to be released into the head movement mechanism, parking the head
Quote from dude2000 View Post :
I agree with this statement.

you should be able to use UPS and/scheduled shutdown and wake on lan
Newer hard drives should be OK in that way. It's the current that does the damage on a power outage, spikes from the power supply, dirty electricity, etc.
It can damage various components, not just hard drives.
Certainly you can land up with corrupt systems and damaged components over an extended period of time.
....................................................................................................................................................
PS: Here's some data on the matter, with regards to shutting down a computer by cutting the power.
http://superuser.com/questions/10...e-hardware
Quote :
Pulling the plug could introduce surges or spikes immediately preceding the actual power loss.
Usually such spikes and troughs in the power will contribute to wear and tear which decreases the lifespan of the computer, but does not usually kill it right away.
http://www.halfgaar.net/why-power...-your-data
Explains why power outages are bad for your data.
As you have a UPS, the shut down will be delayed, but if it is the type of UPS that can shut down your computer normally, then you would avoid all damage, both to hardware and to the OS.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by RockySosua May 5, 2012 at 01:26 PM
Joined Mar 2007
Password: ••••••••
21,218 Posts
1,587 Reputation
#12
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Newer hard drives should be OK in that way. It's the current that does the damage on a power outage, spikes from the power supply, dirty electricity, etc.
It can damage various components, not just hard drives.
Certainly you can land up with corrupt systems and damaged components over an extended period of time.
In the event of a power outage by the utility company, possibly. But if you're just pulling the plug or a circuit breaker trips, it's not going to cause a problem.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 1 of 1
1
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard