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upgrading to SSD for Dell mini 10v

itchy8 526 78 May 31, 2012 at 10:14 AM
I need help about upgrading my hard drive to SSD for my mini 10v. I am not sure what SSD does it support. I have searched online, and I didn't find an exact answer. Thanks!

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#2
Any 7mm or 9mm thick 2.5" SSD should be fine.
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Quote from dhc014 View Post :
Any 7mm or 9mm thick 2.5" SSD should be fine.
This and paying for SATA 6 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seri...bit.2Fs.29 is not worth it since this machine does not likely support it. A SATA 3 drive is backwards compatible with SATA2 its just not worth the premium.
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Quote from itchy8 View Post :
I need help about upgrading my hard drive to SSD for my mini 10v. I am not sure what SSD does it support. I have searched online, and I didn't find an exact answer. Thanks!
Assuming that your present drive is a regular mechanical drive, then you can use any SSD that suits you.
I've used the Intel X25 SSD's with good results but most people here prefer the crucial M4.
The SSD's are made to replace mechanical drives and all of them should fit.
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Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Assuming that your present drive is a regular mechanical drive, then you can use any SSD that suits you.
I've used the Intel X25 SSD's with good results but most people here prefer the crucial M4.
The SSD's are made to replace mechanical drives and all of them should fit.
What do you mean by regular mechanical drive? Mini 10v supports Sata I, so I am not sure if a sata II is overkill or something. Does it matter if I upgrade to a faster SSD like crucial m4?

Thanks for replying!

Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
This and paying for SATA 6 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seri...bit.2Fs.29 is not worth it since this machine does not likely support it. A SATA 3 drive is backwards compatible with SATA2 its just not worth the premium.
So SATA 3 and under will work fine and faster?

Thanks!
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Last edited by itchy8 May 31, 2012 at 02:59 PM
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#6
Quote from itchy8 View Post :
What do you mean by regular mechanical drive? Mini 10v supports Sata I, so I am not sure if a sata II is overkill or something. Does it matter if I upgrade to a faster SSD like crucial m4?

Thanks for replying!



So SATA 3 and under will work fine and faster?

Thanks!
Some Dell Mini's came with solid state drives of a sort, but not like the fast ones we use as replacements. They were more like thumb drives and slower than molasses going uphill.
Those drives, usually, 4, 8 or 16 gigs, used different connectors and they were not the same size and shape as a regular laptop drive, which is why I made the stipulation, that as long as you presently have a normal mechanical hard drive, sometimes called a spinner, then any SATA SSD will do.
If you happened to get a superb deal on a SATA3 SSD, it would work, but would not give you one grain of extra speed over the regular SATA2.
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Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Some Dell Mini's came with solid state drives of a sort, but not like the fast ones we use as replacements. They were more like thumb drives and slower than molasses going uphill.
Those drives, usually, 4, 8 or 16 gigs, used different connectors and they were not the same size and shape as a regular laptop drive, which is why I made the stipulation, that as long as you presently have a normal mechanical hard drive, sometimes called a spinner, then any SATA SSD will do.
If you happened to get a superb deal on a SATA3 SSD, it would work, but would not give you one grain of extra speed over the regular SATA2.
The Dell Mini 9 used the the weird "Mini PCIe" SSD cards that you mention. I think all other Minis use 2.5" SATA drives... but the original Mini 10 (model 1010) has some serious limitations/quirks.

I believe the OP's 10v (model 1011) will have no problems with a normal 2.5" SATA SSD, aside from the aforementioned 1.5Gbps speed limit.
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#8
Quote from redskull View Post :
The Dell Mini 9 used the the weird "Mini PCIe" SSD cards that you mention. I think all other Minis use 2.5" SATA drives... but the original Mini 10 (model 1010) has some serious limitations/quirks.

I believe the OP's 10v (model 1011) will have no problems with a normal 2.5" SATA SSD, aside from the aforementioned 1.5Gbps speed limit.
I agree that in North America, the Mini 10 had a regular hard drive.
I tweaked a Mini recent;y that had one of those frustratingly slow SSD's and if I remember correctly, it was a 10 incher that the fellow bought somewhere in the Orient, but I may be mistaken. Maybe it was a niner.
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Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Some Dell Mini's came with solid state drives of a sort, but not like the fast ones we use as replacements. They were more like thumb drives and slower than molasses going uphill.
Those drives, usually, 4, 8 or 16 gigs, used different connectors and they were not the same size and shape as a regular laptop drive, which is why I made the stipulation, that as long as you presently have a normal mechanical hard drive, sometimes called a spinner, then any SATA SSD will do.
If you happened to get a superb deal on a SATA3 SSD, it would work, but would not give you one grain of extra speed over the regular SATA2.
Nice. thanks for the inputs. I will wait a deal for SATA2 then. Smilie
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Quote from itchy8 View Post :
Nice. thanks for the inputs. I will wait a deal for SATA2 then. Smilie
SATA II drives are not really being produced anymore so supply is limited and despite their weaker performance, they are rarely less expensive than SATA III drives on sale.

What I'm trying to say is; you will likely get the best deal on a SATA III drive even though your system will not allow such a drive to reach its full potential.
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Last edited by dhc014 June 1, 2012 at 06:56 AM
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Quote from dhc014 View Post :
SATA II drives are not really being produced anymore so supply is limited and despite their weaker performance, they are rarely less expensive than SATA III drives on sale.
yes, my point is its not going to be worth the premium to buy a SATA 3 drive if you find a SATA 2 with similar performance. Also since this is a low powered Atom machine getting the fastest SSD you can would also be not worth the money. A normal main stream drive or even a budget ssd would be fine here. Also watch the cost since you could easily spend more on an ssd than the machine cost new.
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Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Also since this is a low powered Atom machine getting the fastest SSD you can would also be not worth the money. A normal main stream drive or even a budget ssd would be fine here.
Correct.
The pix below show the identical SSD (Intel X25) in two different machines, the first a netbook with an Intel Atom N450 and the second, a 13 inch Toshiba with a ULV Intel U4100 that is approx 4 times the power of the Atom.
These benchmarks were the very best that could be squeezed out of each one and they show that although the SSD's are identical, there is a bottleneck of sorts in the netbook, that simply won't allow for using all the speed that the SSD can provide.
As the SATA3's become more mainstream, I expect that there are and will be lots of good deals on SATA2 SSD's and if the SSD is only going to be used in the netbook with no future plans of using it in a more modern machine, then the SATA2 option would be a better financial decision.
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Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Correct.
The pix below show the identical SSD (Intel X25) in two different machines, the first a netbook with an Intel Atom N450 and the second, a 13 inch Toshiba with a ULV Intel U4100 that is approx 4 times the power of the Atom.
These benchmarks were the very best that could be squeezed out of each one and they show that although the SSD's are identical, there is a bottleneck of sorts in the netbook, that simply won't allow for using all the speed that the SSD can provide.
As the SATA3's become more mainstream, I expect that there are and will be lots of good deals on SATA2 SSD's and if the SSD is only going to be used in the netbook with no future plans of using it in a more modern machine, then the SATA2 option would be a better financial decision.
I agree it will speed up the PC a lot, but my point is there its not worth the money to buy the fastest drive possible because this is a netbook, it will have SATA 2 and it has a very low power processor. An SSD will speed up many things but it won't help game for instance there is only so much that can be done and only so much that can be improved. Any ssd will be an improvement so in this case it would be ok to go budget.
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#14
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
I agree it will speed up the PC a lot, but my point is there its not worth the money to buy the fastest drive possible because this is a netbook, it will have SATA 2 and it has a very low power processor. An SSD will speed up many things but it won't help game for instance there is only so much that can be done and only so much that can be improved. Any ssd will be an improvement so in this case it would be ok to go budget.
Your point wasn't lost with me. I fully agree and the benchmarks prove it.
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Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Your point wasn't lost with me. I fully agree and the benchmarks prove it.
Ok I had to guess on the second picture, it would not load for me.
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