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BS in Electrical Engineer. Full-time employee. Is it worth doing Masters ?

addtd2sd 1,413 320 July 30, 2012 at 05:17 PM
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I've a dilemma. Hope someone can point me in the right direction.

I've a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering and i've a stable full-time job. Is it worth quitting my current job to pursue masters in either ECE or Computer Science ? It will cost me ~$22k ($8.5k per semester *2 + summer tuition).


Are there any advantageous ? I've 2-3yrs experience in this field and most people i've talked to advice me not to do it because my experience has "more value" than a MS. But then, some have advised me to do it before "you're too old".

Does an MS degree give me any advantage when it comes to promotions and stuffs or will they look at your experience and skill sets only ?


Any help is appreciated.

Edit: I work as a developer. (not sure if it matters)

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#31
"I've a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering and i've a stable full-time job. Is it worth quitting my current job to pursue masters in either ECE or Computer Science ? It will cost me ~$22k ($8.5k per semester *2 + summer tuition)."

worth it if you want a tenure-track job @ a community college. you'd be a really desirable instructor, given your ability to teach a lot of classes (comp. sci., math, physics, logic, technical writing, etc.)

no need to pay $22k+, though. attend a cheap state school instead.
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#32
I wouldn't do a technical masters program in hopes of increased pay. Becoming an expert in your field will increase your pay much faster than another paper education.
There is some merit for getting an MBA, but even that is debatable if staying in the engineering field. Many companies do put having a MBA and masters as a requirement for upper level positions, but in reality if you are a good fit for the position they will overlook not having the MBA or masters.
Another thing, you have to think if managing is your forte or your want to stay technical. Of course, staying technical theoretically maxes you out on pay.
I'm currently in a specialized position and make more than most management or masters positions.
Some info: BSME '04 and 7yrs with the same company holding two positions in that time.
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#33
Looks like the OP already decided, but I thought I'd weight in here. I have a BS, MS, and PhD in EE. MS and PhD are from an Ivy League institution with a very well respected ECE program. From my experience, unless you have a VERY specific reason that you want to get a post graduate degree (particularly in ECE), I'd highly recommend against it. In the case here, if you already have a job in an EE-related field and the outlook for career stability and advancement is reasonable, the opportunity cost of graduate school is simply much too high to justify the paltry returns.

In my eyes, there's really only a couple of reasons to get a graduate degree in EE. First, you simply have no prospects coming out of your undergraduate studies and you don't want to tread water. Second, you have a burning and highly focused desire to get into academia. Otherwise, a graduate degree, particularly an MS, gets you very little that a few years in an industry-related job won't already get you.

This would be a different story if your existing employers had a work/study reimbursement program, but there's no way dropping $20k+ and sacrificing a year or two of stable pay will be worth it.
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#34
Quote from financechick View Post :
"I've a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering and i've a stable full-time job. Is it worth quitting my current job to pursue masters in either ECE or Computer Science ? It will cost me ~$22k ($8.5k per semester *2 + summer tuition)."

worth it if you want a tenure-track job @ a community college. you'd be a really desirable instructor, given your ability to teach a lot of classes (comp. sci., math, physics, logic, technical writing, etc.)

no need to pay $22k+, though. attend a cheap state school instead.
You aren't going to find cheaper than $22k for a masters degree anywhere that is accredited. I actually thought you were talking about $22k/year. $22k for the entire MS is SUPER cheap.
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E finita la cuccagna

Liberals want you to think like them, Conservatives just want you to think!
#35
Quote from dealgate View Post :
You aren't going to find cheaper than $22k for a masters degree anywhere that is accredited. I actually thought you were talking about $22k/year. $22k for the entire MS is SUPER cheap.
Columbus State University (commonly referred to by locals as CSU) is a public institution of higher learning located in Columbus, Georgia. Founded as Columbus College in 1958, the university was established and is administered by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colu...University

http://cs.columbusstate.edu/curri...9-2010.php

Tuition for the online M.S. in Applied Computer Science is charged at $285 per credit hour plus the technology fee and institutional fee.

http://registration.columbusstate...udent.html

Total Required Hours: 36

36*285(per credit hour) = $10,260

$265 (institutional fee) + $69 (tech. fee) = $334 * 4 semesters = $1,336

$10,260 + $1,336 = $11,596 total
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#36
Quote from financechick View Post :
Columbus State University (commonly referred to by locals as CSU) is a public institution of higher learning located in Columbus, Georgia. Founded as Columbus College in 1958, the university was established and is administered by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, and is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colu...University

http://cs.columbusstate.edu/curri...9-2010.php

Tuition for the online M.S. in Applied Computer Science is charged at $285 per credit hour plus the technology fee and institutional fee.

http://registration.columbusstate...udent.html

Total Required Hours: 36

36*285(per credit hour) = $10,260

$265 (institutional fee) + $69 (tech. fee) = $334 * 4 semesters = $1,336

$10,260 + $1,336 = $11,596 total
Sure, but let's be realistic here. The purpose of graduate school is to open up doors that you cannot access through just an undergraduate degree. Taking a one year online "M.S" in an obscure college isn't going to do much of anything. I mean that as no disrespect towards CSU, but if you already have a stable job in-field, quitting it to pursue an online degree at a low-tier college will hurt more than it'll help, no matter what the cost of tuition is.
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#37
Quote from huevos View Post :
Sure, but let's be realistic here. The purpose of graduate school is to open up doors that you cannot access through just an undergraduate degree. Taking a one year online "M.S" in an obscure college isn't going to do much of anything. I mean that as no disrespect towards CSU, but if you already have a stable job in-field, quitting it to pursue an online degree at a low-tier college will hurt more than it'll help, no matter what the cost of tuition is.
In an earlier post, I said a cheap M.S. could open a door to an easy gig @ a community college, where trashy grad. degrees are the norm. I never suggested that this was a good idea for industry advancement.
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