Forum Thread

Hard Drive Causing Windows to Freeze? Repairable?

Initial Z 688 92 August 5, 2012 at 10:49 PM
Hey guys.

I have been having a bunch of computer problems recently. The latest is that my computer would seem to randomly freeze once every day or two. I started suspecting it was my hard drive because it seems to freeze either when I'm downloading something or when I'm watching videos stored on that drive.

I currently have a 120 GB OCZ Agility SSD and a 2 TB Seagate "green" drive (don't know the model). I have downloaded Seatool, for diagnostic purposes and from what I can tell, the "short dst" test failed and the "long generic" test seems to freeze... it appears to have stopped testing a few seconds into the test. Everything else passes. Now, I have no idea the short dst test failing means..... but Seatools recommended that I run the DOS version of Seatools to try to repair the problem. I ran that, but it said no hard drives were detected..

So now, I am kind of stuck. I want to try to repair the drive if possible, but I do not know how. My drive is still under warranty, so worse come to worse, I can return it. It will be quite a hassle to back up all my data because my only other drive is a 1 TB HDD, and my 2 TB is nearly full... Anyway, does anyone know any way I can attempt to repair my failing HDD?

Also to clarify, I am able to access files fine on this hard drive. It's just, my computer freezes randomly sometimes when doing so. Freezing happens on average once every day or two.

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#2
it sounds like ur hd may have some bad sectors, causing read errors....
i would immediately back up any data you value.

Some things you can also check / do:
1) view the event system logs for any errors
2) run a disk check or defrag on the disk
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#3
your best bet is to stop using the drive copy over stuff you must have either to another drive or the cloud order new warrantee drive when you get it clone the old drive if possible then send back old one after verifying new one and wiping the old drive.


There are tools such as spinrite and hdd regenerator that might help but a drive that is under warranty should just be replaced spinrite stresses the disks a lot and could cause it to fail as much as fix it
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#4
The greater wisdom is to return the drive for exchange and buy another big HD before sending yours to the manufacturer, so as to copy all that data. As it stands right now, if your 2 TB has no space for all your data, you were going to be needing another drive shortly, anyhow,
In the meantime, a disk check/repair is the best route to take, but if you're quite sure that hard drive is dying, then it's best to not even use it except when it comes time to copy all your data.
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#5
Iagree with the previous recommendations. First step is to get your data backed up asap. Who knows how much longer before that drive gets worse and worse.

Check the Event Viewer to see if there are any disk or Ntfs errors which could indicate either physical hard disk errors or OS file system corruption.

You could use something like SpinRite [grc.com] to see if you can repair the HDD if the SeaTools does not work for you.

Personally I'd get that data off that drive and get it sent back for a return since it is under warranty. Burn to DVD the most important stuff and back up the rest to one or more TB HDDs.
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Last edited by menace33 August 6, 2012 at 06:18 AM
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#6
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
The greater wisdom is to return the drive for exchange and buy another big HD before sending yours to the manufacturer, so as to copy all that data. As it stands right now, if your 2 TB has no space for all your data, you were going to be needing another drive shortly, anyhow,
In the meantime, a disk check/repair is the best route to take, but if you're quite sure that hard drive is dying, then it's best to not even use it except when it comes time to copy all your data.
I agree, try chkdsk. (just use the pictures provided in the quoted post.)

Here's a chkdsk story from back in high school...I'd carry my floppy disk in my pocket and I kept having issues with the disk. I'd run chkdsk, watch the pretty graphics, and typically the data was saved. Once the disk was essentially all errors\fixed errors, I bought a new disk and cracked open the old one. I found pocket lint in the disk. Smilie
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#7
Quote from menace33 View Post :
Iagree with the previous recommendations. First step is to get your data backed up asap. Who knows how much longer before that drive gets worse and worse.

Check the Event Viewer to see if there are any disk or Ntfs errors which could indicate either physical hard disk errors or OS file system corruption.

You could use something like SpinRite [grc.com] to see if you can repair the HDD if the SeaTools does not work for you.

Personally I'd get that data off that drive and get it sent back for a return since it is under warranty. Burn to DVD the most important stuff and back up the rest to one or more TB HDDs.
Quote from ashcampbell View Post :
I agree, try chkdsk. (just use the pictures provided in the quoted post.)

Here's a chkdsk story from back in high school...I'd carry my floppy disk in my pocket and I kept having issues with the disk. I'd run chkdsk, watch the pretty graphics, and typically the data was saved. Once the disk was essentially all errors\fixed errors, I bought a new disk and cracked open the old one. I found pocket lint in the disk. Smilie
A agree with the above, Backup all data and return the drive to Seagate. Chkdsk and Spinrite do the same thing at it's most basic parts, but work very differently. Spinrite will identify a sector as bad and they do everything possible to try and read as much as possible from the sector as possible. The result is less files go corrupt or missing. CHKdsk is destructive. It will mark an entire sector as bad, so if part of a photo is stored on that sector the entire photo goes corrupt.

With this said, I would do the following. Backup as much as you can now. If you have to go buy another drive, then you can use it as a backup drive in the future (Good idea anyways). If you have spinrite run it, if not try chkdsk to finish what your missing.
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#8
I assume that Windows is loaded on the OCZ SSD?
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#9
Download MHDD from HDDguru.com and run its surface scan because unlike other surface scans, MHDD will report sectors that are marginal, not just completely bad.

I've found that hard disks with too many reallocated sectors will cause SMART tests to report problems or not even start reading sectors. Sometimes you can fix this by using a utility to read & rewrite sectors (HDAT2 -- be careful with it) or zero all the sectors, as MHDD and SeaTools can do, to cause the hard disk to reallocate bad sectors. Defragmenting a drive does no better and won't help unless all the bad sectors are rewritten, which the defragmenter isn't guaranteed to do.

But as others have said, get the drive replaced if it's under warranty.
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#10
Quote from larrymoencurly View Post :
Download MHDD from HDDguru.com and run its surface scan because unlike other surface scans, MHDD will report sectors that are marginal, not just completely bad.

I've found that hard disks with too many reallocated sectors will cause SMART tests to report problems or not even start reading sectors. Sometimes you can fix this by using a utility to read & rewrite sectors (HDAT2 -- be careful with it) or zero all the sectors, as MHDD and SeaTools can do, to cause the hard disk to reallocate bad sectors. Defragmenting a drive does no better and won't help unless all the bad sectors are rewritten, which the defragmenter isn't guaranteed to do.

But as others have said, get the drive replaced if it's under warranty.
And it's free! Always a good thing!
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#11
Thanks everyone. I will try some of these when I get home. I am not entirely sure the drive is dying per se.. it's been like this for several weeks now. And there hasn't been any files that I could not access. The good thing is there aren't any super important files stored on this hard drive, mostly just movies, tv shows, music, etc.. however, I'd still back up a portion of it with my 1 TB drive that is sitting around.
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#12
Quote from Initial Z View Post :
Thanks everyone. I will try some of these when I get home. I am not entirely sure the drive is dying per se.. it's been like this for several weeks now. And there hasn't been any files that I could not access. The good thing is there aren't any super important files stored on this hard drive, mostly just movies, tv shows, music, etc.. however, I'd still back up a portion of it with my 1 TB drive that is sitting around.
No, the problems you are experiencing are pretty classic for a failing drive. Bad sectors more than likely. A healthy drive won't fail the seagate tests. The good news is, its not in terrible shape so you should be able to backup your stuff and get it replaced without the pain of loosing data. If you keep waiting you are only increasing the chances of further problems down the road.
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#13
To the OP:
Does the whole computer freeze up when the hard drive problem occurs?
BTW: How full is that 1 TB drive. Is it in the red?

I've been searching my own memory (in my tiny brain) to remember if I ever saw an entire freeze up/crash, from an installed hard drive that did not carry the OS, and the answer is yes, but the drives that caused the crash, were toast and were not still accessible like yours is.
It's my conclusion that if the entire computer is freezing up when the problem occurs, that either it is from some other problem, or that 1 TB hard drive is in much worse shape than you think it is.
I'm surprised that the problem has been going on for so long without it dying.
How sure are you that it is the 1 TB drive causing the problem?
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#14
I am 70% sure that it's a motherboard issue.
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#15
Quote from HetfiledJ View Post :
I am 70% sure that it's a motherboard issue.
The 70% is based off of what?
The other 30% could be what, by your recollection?
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