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Petco 29 Gallon Aquarium Deluxe Kit $69.99 $120OFF

Highagain420 165 August 13, 2012 at 03:11 AM in Home & Home Improvement (3) More Petco Deals
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Last Edited by widgit August 13, 2012 at 04:04 PM
Petco 29 Gallon Aquarium Deluxe Kit $69.99 Regular price is $189.99

Petco currently has Aqueon 29 Gallon Deluxe kit for sale.
Comes with Glass Aquarium with Black Trim, QuietFlow™ Power Filter, Filter Cartridge, Deluxe Fluorescent Hood, Fluorescent Bulb, Submersible Heater, Aquarium Set-up, Care Guide, Water Conditioner, Digital Thermometer, Premium Fish Food and a Fish Net


Deal may be regional. To check

1.) Go to http://www.petco.com/
2.) On bottom of page and click "View Your Local Ad"
3.) Type Zip code and pick location
4.) Deal is shown on page 6
5.) Also should be displayed in store. Can confirm it is here in Honolulu, Hawaii

121 Comments

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#61
Quote from 7Enigma View Post :
2. You do not need aquarium salt in a freshwater fish tank. There are fish that prefer salt (mollies, SOME puffers, etc.) but these are mild or moderate brackish fish. Putting salt into a guppy tank is NOT needed, and potentially harmful.

3. You should never replace filter pads unless they fall completely apart. The biological filter is what keeps your fish safe and that doesn't "run out" after a month or two. The filter companies only get paid if you continue to buy their inserts. Ignore that and RINSE the filters in USED TANK WATER to remove the gunk that inhibits the water flow, and then reinstall. Viola, a new filter. I've replaced a filter pad ONCE in 7 years, because it literally melted in my hand after cleaning it so many times.

4. Water changes are mandatory (this is just to reiterate, not in argument to the quoted comments). 10-50% once a week, depending on how stocked/fed/etc. I do 50% changes once a week. Doesn't take much longer than a 25% water change and is a nice way to be sure the water parameters are not getting too out of whack. Topping up (only water evaporates, all the crud and toxins are still in the water) IS NOT ACCEPTABLE!
Just some comments on these. You'll find that just about every fish keeper has their own opinions, so it's not always a right/wrong thing, sometimes there is a lot of gray. Also, lots of people succeed in spite of breaking "rules", which causes a lot of misinformation on top of it all.

2. I would say this depends on your water source. RO or DI would almost certainly see benefit (if not necessary) in adding some salt and minerals added back. Tap? Depends on your area! If you have outrageously hard water, maybe none is needed. They can test for that for free. A few tablespoons of aquarium salt doesn't get it anywhere near a brackish environment. The natural environment of a guppy does have plenty of dissolved minerals in it. It's like $2 for a box of salt. Just add some salt.

3. Well, there are different types of filtration. Mechanical filters, correct, as long as they are in good shape, keep using them. But depending on how you clean them, you might be killing anything biological on it. Biological, which most filters don't target with a specific media, almost never has to be changed and should almost never be "cleaned". Chemical (in this case, carbon) should absolutely be replaced frequently

Yes, the biological part is what keeps the fish healthy, but the chemical and mechanical parts keep it attractive for you. You don't "need" carbon but it can help with clarity, smell, oil sheen on top, etc. Higher end filters will allow you to replace various forms of filtration separately, but most of the cheap ones just stash carbon in a filter pouch, which you replace all at once.

4. Water changes... 50% a week? JEEZ. I'd be a little more careful about your controlled environment. Any benefit you get by such frequent, large water changes is probably countered by the stress you put it through so regularly. Water changes remove nitrate, so the frequency needed depends on the stocking levels, feeding schedule, etc. If you're replacing 50% weekly because you need to, it's outrageously overstocked. And on the necessity of water changes- I have a saltwater tank set it so specifically that it hasn't needed a water change in several years.
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#62
Quote from garrett1230 View Post :
Assuming you were planning on creating a fresh water tank, you won't need to spend a great deal more. You would need to purchase gravel which shouldn't cost more than $15 - $20 and the gravel vacuum or siphon can be purchased for less than $10. You will also want to purchase a couple of buckets from Home Depot to use for water changes. Be sure to purchase new buckets and keep them dedicated for use with your fish tank. Don't use them for other purposes other than adding fresh water and a separate bucket for removing the dirty water from your fish tank. Beyond that, you just need to purchase the fish. And most of the freshwater fish that would go in this tank should be relatively inexpensive.
Agreed here. I will add that you can get a gravel vac with a long hose that attaches to the sink, kind of like an old water bed fill/drain. It was one of my favorite fish tank investments. You probably won't want to fill from it (with fish in it) until you know what you're doing and what your water is like, but eventually you can. In addition, you can create a more "natural" looking environment by using pea gravel from Lowes for much cheaper, and large rocks from a landscaping place instead of silly neon colored decor hooked to bubblers. Spray paint the back of the tank blue or black instead of taping one of those tacky backgrounds on it. Let the emphasis be on the fish.
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#63
Quote from 7Enigma View Post :
Uh oh, here comes the bad/dangerous information.

1. You do need to use a dechlorinator (I recommend Prime because it's cheap and lasts forever). Many municipalities now use chloramine because it is more stable in the water (ie it doesn't evaporate). You can let this sit out all you want and it will still do harm to your fish. To make matters worse when it reacts with something the -amine is essentially ammonia which will further hurt your fish.

2. You do not need aquarium salt in a freshwater fish tank. There are fish that prefer salt (mollies, SOME puffers, etc.) but these are mild or moderate brackish fish. Putting salt into a guppy tank is NOT needed, and potentially harmful.

3. You should never replace filter pads unless they fall completely apart. The biological filter is what keeps your fish safe and that doesn't "run out" after a month or two. The filter companies only get paid if you continue to buy their inserts. Ignore that and RINSE the filters in USED TANK WATER to remove the gunk that inhibits the water flow, and then reinstall. Viola, a new filter. I've replaced a filter pad ONCE in 7 years, because it literally melted in my hand after cleaning it so many times.

4. Water changes are mandatory (this is just to reiterate, not in argument to the quoted comments). 10-50% once a week, depending on how stocked/fed/etc. When you do a water change you need to use the SAME TEMPERATURE water as in your tank. You also ideally need to add in dechlorinator PRIOR to adding the water to the tank (this is only applicable for smaller tanks where you fill with buckets). If you cannot do this or you have a huge tank that fills from a water line you need to dose the tank with enough dechlorinator for the TOTAL VOLUME OF THE TANK (very important). I do 50% changes once a week. Doesn't take much longer than a 25% water change and is a nice way to be sure the water parameters are not getting too out of whack. Topping up (only water evaporates, all the crud and toxins are still in the water) IS NOT ACCEPTABLE!

HTH
In regard to #3, you're correct and I shouldn't have stated that you should replace your filter pads. You should just rinse them in used tank water. I mainly use a refugium for my biological filtration. I apologize for the misinformation.

In regard to #4, I think 50% water changes is way too much to be doing on a weekly basis, but if that's what works for you so be it. Changing that much water weekly can make it difficult to keep your water parameters stable. I perform 10% weekly water changes and my parameters have been stable for over 10 years. I agree with all of your other advice though.
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#64
Quote from 7Enigma View Post :
Uh oh, here comes the bad/dangerous information.

1. You do need to use a dechlorinator (I recommend Prime because it's cheap and lasts forever). Many municipalities now use chloramine because it is more stable in the water (ie it doesn't evaporate). You can let this sit out all you want and it will still do harm to your fish. To make matters worse when it reacts with something the -amine is essentially ammonia which will further hurt your fish.
Again they may pose a danger but overblown
see http://www.skepticalaquarist.com/...chloramine
Actually chloramines have been in use for 90yrs but only 20% of folks even have chlorinated water and whether one or the other is used varies depending on your utility. NYC for example does not use chloramine

http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/rul....cfm#three

I just run my water through a standard PUR water filter and let it stand for 48hrs.

Like I said, have had tanks since the 70's and kept plenty of healthy fish. Many of your communitiy fish like gouramies, Corydoras cats and barbs don't require much in terms.
Last edited by sr71 August 13, 2012 at 01:44 PM
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#65
Quote from Denverticket View Post :
Is it hard to maintain a saltwater fish tank? Saw the earlier post that this also may not be the best saltwater tank but would live some other SD opinions, TIA
Agree with the other posters who said it's more tedious to set up but easier to maintain.
This kit doesn't have a protein skimmer and you'll need a hydrometer to test proper salinity. We forget lot of beginning folks getting into saltwater can't really invest a in 55 gal with stand to start off.
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#66
Quote from DarthSaver View Post :
The same reason folks in Alaska still want ice makers in their fridge Dontknow

Touche
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#67
craiglist is still cheaper imo
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#68
Added to the Wiki

From Aqueon [aqueonproducts.com] site

High Resolution Product Image [aqueonproducts.com]

Deluxe Aquarium Kit
Aqueon Deluxe Kits offers a complete all-in-one habitat that makes it easy for beginners and hobbyists alike. Features complete Aqueon Lighting and Filtration systems.

Kit Includes

Glass Aquarium with Black Trim
QuietFlow™ Power Filter
Filter Cartridge
Deluxe Fluorescent Hood
Fluorescent Bulb
Submersible Heater
Aquarium Set-up and Care Guide
Water Conditioner
Digital Thermometer
Premium Fish Food
Fish Net

All components needed for a healthy aquatic environment.
*Size 10, Heater Not Included
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#69
Quote from Wasser View Post :
Actually, live plants will take up ammonium and nitrites just as readily as nitrates.

The kicker here is that the plants need to be actively growing (photosynthesizing) and not be in some degree of decay. With the lights that come with the tank, this will a bit questionable. You should be able to grow some undemanding ones, like Java Ferns, Mosses, Cryptocorynes... but the fast growers like Hygrophila, Rotalas etc will not grow optimally.

Check out plantedtankdotnet for more information. wave
Hi five - another TPT'er Smilie

Seriously, if you get this tank, consider live plants - you will need to upgrade the hood though since the stock hood isn't good enough for most plants. It's so satisfying having a thriving little water garden! The Planted Tank forum is definitely the site to go to if you decide on a planted tank Smilie

I've used regular fish tank gravel from Petsmart in my 25 yrs of fishkeeping and grow plants like they're weeds. The heater and power filter are good enough and it can never hurt to even add another filter like an Aquaclear. If you get goldfish, you'll want another filter but you can ditch the heater - they're cold water fish. Also, you can only keep about 3 goldfish in a tank that size - they're very messy (hence an additional filter)!
Last edited by boomie August 13, 2012 at 12:44 PM
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#70
thanks
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#71
For you newbies, it may seem confusing and daunting to start this hobby with so many advice coming from so many people. I know I was when I first started and wished I had some very simple explanations to help me understand what I'm doing. Here are a few to help you get started:
  1. Can I use tap water in my fish tank?

    Most city use chlorine/chloramine as disinfectant to keep water coming out of our tap safe for human consumption. Chlorine can burn fish gills and kill them. So, short answer is no. One quick way to get rid of chlorine/chloramine from your tap water is to use a water conditioner sold in most fish pet stores.

  2. What is this talk of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate in the fish tank?

    Fish pee and poop like we do. Those turn into ammonia in the fish tank water. Ammonia is poisonous to fish and will kill them in sufficient quantity. There is a natural occuring bacteria in the fish tank that can consume ammonia and turn it into nitrite. However, nitrite is still poisonous to fish. There is yet another bateria in the fish tank that can consume nitrite and turn it into nitrate. Most fish can tolerate some amounts of nitrate in the fish tank. As long as there is sufficient amount of these natural occuring bacteria in your fish tank, ammonia and nitrite can be kept in check.

  3. How do I get these natural occuring bacteria into my fish tank?

    You need to introduce a source of ammonia into your fish tank water for these bacteria to start growing, seemingly out of thin air. These bacteria will need a constant supply of ammonia to continue to exist and multiply. More ammonia will grow more bacteria. They will convert ammonia into nitrite, and then from nitrite into nitrate.

  4. How do I know if these bacteria are growing in my fish tank?

    By using water testing kits sold in fish pet stores. You can measure ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels with these kits. Initially, you will measure high level of ammonia and almost no nitrite or nitrate. Then, you will notice the the nitrite level go up and ammonia level go down. Eventually, you will measure nearly no ammonia and nitrite, but nitrate level will gradually go up. Most people say this process takes a few weeks to occur in a brand new fish tank. People refer to this process as tank cycling.

  5. How do I get this cycling process started?

    Some people use fish to introduce the needed ammonia. IMHO, this is cruel to the fish as they will be exposed to prolonged levels of ammonia and nitrite which either kill them or cause long term health issues. Others borrow some gravel from a mature fish tank which already have these bacteria attached and ready to consume ammonia. Some use fish food (with no fish in the tank) which decompose into ammonia. And then I've read some people just use pure ammonia.

  6. How do I know how many fish the bacteria can support in my fish tank?

    Introduce fish into your fish tank a few at a time. Then, continue to use your water testing kit to make sure ammonia and nitrite levels are kept in check. As you slowly introduce more fish, more bacteria will grow to support the increased ammonia supply (bioload). Test your fish tank water regularly to make sure something hasn't gone out of whack. For example, a dead fish left in the tank can suddenly spike up the ammonia level. Over-feeding can also cause un-eaten food to decompose into ammonia. You might notice some strange behaviors from your fish suddenly (skittish, not eating...etc) and not know why. Test your tank water!

  7. Why do I need to change fish tank water and how often?

    You change fish tank water to lower the nitrate level. Unfortunately, there is no natural occuring bacteria in your fish tank to process nitrate. The longer you don't change tank water, the more nitrate will build up in your tank. Diffierent fish have different tolerance for nitrate levels. How much and how often you change your tank water depends on your fish and your feeding habbits. The key is nitrate level in the tank water. Try to keep nitrate level low and consistent. Consistent water condition is probably more important than trying to target a specific nitrate level. Changing water conditions too quickly and suddenly can shock/stress the fish. A stressed fish can lead to weaker immune system and the fish could get sick or die.

  8. Why do I need to vacuum the gravel in my fish tank?

    Fish poop and un-eaten food settle to the bottom of the fish tank in the gravel. They decompose slowly and turn into an unnecessary source of ammonia for a long time. People usually vacuum the gravel at the same time they change tank water. That is because vacuuming the gravel also takes out some tank water at the same time.

  9. Why do I need a heater in the tank?

    Different fish have different water temperature requirements. But again, keeping consistent water condition (in this case water temperature) is more important than trying to target a specific temperature. Sudden changes in water temperature can shock/stress the fish. This also leads to an often incorrect assumption made by newbies that beginners should start with a small fish tank. Although a bigger tank may require more vacuuming and water changes, the bigger water volume is also more forgiving for beginners. Mistakes can take longer time to affect a larger volume of water, thus reducing the risks of sudden changes to water conditions and stressing the fish.

I will update and correct any mistakes made above as people point them out to me.
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#72
Quote from chung_chang View Post :
For you newbies, it may seem confusing and daunting to start this hobby with so many advice coming from so many people. I know I was when I first started and wished I had some very simple explanations to help me understand what I'm doing. Here are a few to help you get started:
  1. Can I use tap water in my fish tank?

    Most city use chlorine/chloramine as disinfectant to keep water coming out of our tap safe for human consumption. Chlorine can burn fish gills and kill them. So, short answer is no. One quick way to get rid of chlorine/chloramine from your tap water is to use a water conditioner sold in most fish pet stores.

  2. What is this talk of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate in the fish tank?

    Fish pee and poop like we do. Those turn into ammonia in the fish tank water. Ammonia is poisonous to fish and will kill them in sufficient quantity. There is a natural occuring bacteria in the fish tank that can consume ammonia and turn it into nitrite. However, nitrite is still poisonous to fish. There is yet another bateria in the fish tank that can consume nitrite and turn it into nitrate. Most fish can tolerate some amounts of nitrate in the fish tank. As long as there is sufficient amount of these natural occuring bacteria in your fish tank, ammonia and nitrite can be kept in check.

  3. How do I get these natural occuring bacteria into my fish tank?

    You need to introduce a source of ammonia into your fish tank water for these bacteria to start growing, seemingly out of thin air. These bacteria will need a constant supply of ammonia to continue to exist and multiply. More ammonia will grow more bacteria. They will convert ammonia into nitrite, and then from nitrite into nitrate.

  4. How do I know if these bacteria are growing in my fish tank?

    By using water testing kits sold in fish pet stores. You can measure ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels with these kits. Initially, you will measure high level of ammonia and almost no nitrite or nitrate. Then, you will notice the the nitrite level go up and ammonia level go down. Eventually, you will measure nearly no ammonia and nitrite, but nitrate level will gradually go up. Most people say this process takes a few weeks to occur in a brand new fish tank. People refer to this process as tank cycling.

  5. How do I get this cycling process started?

    Some people use fish to introduce the needed ammonia. IMHO, this is cruel to the fish as they will be exposed to prolonged levels of ammonia and nitrite which either kill them or cause long term health issues. Others borrow some gravel from a mature fish tank which already have these bacteria attached and ready to consume ammonia. Some use fish food (with no fish in the tank) which decompose into ammonia. And then I've read some people just use pure ammonia.

  6. How do I know how many fish the bacteria can support in my fish tank?

    Introduce fish into your fish tank a few at a time. Then, continue to use your water testing kit to make sure ammonia and nitrite levels are kept in check. As you slowly introduce more fish, more bacteria will grow to support the increased ammonia supply (bioload). Test your fish tank water regularly to make sure something hasn't gone out of whack. For example, a dead fish left in the tank can suddenly spike up the ammonia level. Over-feeding can also cause un-eaten food to decompose into ammonia. You might notice some strange behaviors from your fish suddenly (skittish, not eating...etc) and not know why. Test your tank water!

  7. Why do I need to change fish tank water and how often?

    You change fish tank water to lower the nitrate level. Unfortunately, there is no natural occuring bacteria in your fish tank to process nitrate. The longer you don't change tank water, the more nitrate will build up in your tank. Diffierent fish have different tolerance for nitrate levels. How much and how often you change your tank water depends on your fish and your feeding habbits. The key is nitrate level in the tank water. Try to keep nitrate level low and consistent. Consistent water condition is probably more important than trying to target a specific nitrate level. Changing water conditions too quickly and suddenly can shock/stress the fish. A stressed fish can lead to weaker immune system and the fish could get sick or die.

  8. Why do I need to vacuum the gravel in my fish tank?

    Fish poop and un-eaten food settle to the bottom of the fish tank in the gravel. They decompose slowly and turn into an unnecessary source of ammonia for a long time. People usually vacuum the gravel at the same time they change tank water. That is because vacuuming the gravel also takes out some tank water at the same time.

  9. Why do I need a heater in the tank?

    Different fish have different water temperature requirements. But again, keeping consistent water condition (in this case water temperature) is more important than trying to target a specific temperature. Sudden changes in water temperature can shock/stress the fish. This also leads to an often incorrect assumption made by newbies that beginners should start with a small fish tank. Although a bigger tank may require more vacuuming and water changes, the bigger water volume is also more forgiving for beginners. Mistakes can take longer time to affect a larger volume of water, thus reducing the risks of sudden changes to water conditions and stressing the fish.

I will update and correct any mistakes made above as people point them out to me.
man, very good information. I wish I read this when setting up the new aquarium last week. Thanks & Rep!
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#73
Quote from johnsonc881 View Post :
my only question is why would anyone who lives in Honolulu, Hawaii want a fish tank?
i know why you asked that but think about it for second because it really is a dumb question.
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#74
Quote from dukpoki View Post :
i know why you asked that but think about it for second because it really is a dumb question.
really? I don't think it is dumb at all, just go to the beach. snorkel or scuba dive. i live in Eastern, PA and have no beaches close!
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#75
Does anyone know where I can get a tank stand for a slick price?
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