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Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet (3-Pack) EXPIRED

tukwok 3,248 November 8, 2012 at 12:24 PM in Home & Home Improvement (2) More Home Depot Deals
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$18.50

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Promoted 11-08-2012 at 01:59 PM View Original Post
Home Depot has Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet (3-Pack) for $18.50 + free shipping. Thanks tucwok

Original Post

Edited November 8, 2012 at 12:26 PM by tukwok
Bring your home or rental(s) up to code or replace any that became damaged or defective.

Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet, White (3-Pack)

$18.00 /EA-Each limit 10 per order
WAS $28.35
Online Special Valid : 11/08/2012 - 11/08/2012
Free Shipping
[homedepot.com]

Help protect your family from electrical shock by installing SmartlockPro GFCIs. The National Electrical Code requires GFCIs in bathrooms, kitchens, basements, garages, workshops, and laundry rooms. GFCIs can be damaged over time; they must be tested monthly to ensure they are providing proper protection.


Specially designed circuits offer superior surge protection
Cannot be reset if miswired (line/load reversal only) or if GFCI protection is compromised
Backwire feature for easy installation
Installs in place of standard outlet
Backwire feature for easy installation
Cannot be reset if miswired with a line/load reversal or if GFCI protection is compromised
CSA and UL listed
MFG Brand Name : Leviton
MFG Model # : M22-07599-03W
MFG Part # : M22-07599-03W

105 Comments

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#91
Quote from Thadius856 View Post :
Most people who have bought these probably aren't sure what they've bought. Some background information to keep everybody safe:

http://www.diycontrols.com/images/15amp_20amp.JPG

If you have 15A receptacles in place, you should replace them with 15A GFCIs. Same for 20A. You *may* replace 15A receptacles with 20A receptacles only if your are sure that 12 awg wire is used all the way back to the panel, every device on that circuit is rated for 20A feedthrough, and you have a 20A breaker installed on that circuit. 99% of the people here are not sure of that, so don't do it. You could open a huge can of liability that you just don't want.

On the first page, several people say they work for electrical engineering firms and they always spec 20A. That's very ignorant of them to suggest. They most likely spec 20A because it is a requirement in commercial settings. They are not required in residential kitchens or bathrooms by any national code. Do you own or have you ever owned any kitchen appliance with a 20A plug? Didn't think so. Again, do not install 20A GFCIs where 15A receptacles used to be without all of the above assurances.

One person said that installing a GFCI where you have only old ungrounded 2-wire (hot/neutral, or two prong receptacle) provides the same protection as having a ground there. This is incorrect. Grounds protect humans and equipment; GFCIs protect only humans and defeat surge protectors.

Just finished rewiring my entire kitchen and more of the rest of the house because a previous owner did unsafe electrical work. If anybody has any safety or code questions, please let me know; I just went through all of this for the last year.
Ignorant of me to suggest? Not required by code but as an example in my hosue my hairdryer is over 1800 watts, my curling iron is another 100+. If I use my hairdryer and curling iron at teh same time ona 15A breaker, receptacle and wire I will for sure pop a breaker. that is why we always spec 20A receptacles, breakers and outlets. Never do we use 15 in NEW construction. Absolutly no cost savings at all and just asking for future trouble.
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#92
Quote from chintuk1 View Post :
Noob question. I have an indoor heater that uses 12.5 Amps. Occasionally my circuit breaker trips. If I plug the heater into one of these outlets, will this trip just the outlet and not the entire circuit??
Depends where the GFCI is on the circuit path and how sensitive it is to overdraw compared to your breaker in the main panel. So that's a "maybe", depending on several factors.

The fact that a 12.5 amp heater is tripping a circuit is a bigger concern if it's on a circuit by itself.
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#93
Quote from Thadius856 View Post :
One person said that installing a GFCI where you have only old ungrounded 2-wire (hot/neutral, or two prong receptacle) provides the same protection as having a ground there. This is incorrect. Grounds protect humans and equipment; GFCIs protect only humans and defeat surge protectors.
How do they "defeat surge protectors"? Do you mean that the GFCI will trip instead of allowing a brief surge through to the surge protector? Or do you mean that it will allow the surge through but somehow disable the ability of the surge protector to protect? Or something else?

Thanks.
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#94
Quote from my3cents View Post :
How do they "defeat surge protectors"? Do you mean that the GFCI will trip instead of allowing a brief surge through to the surge protector? Or do you mean that it will allow the surge through but somehow disable the ability of the surge protector to protect? Or something else?

Thanks.
Surge protectors must be plugged into GFCIs.

Plugging a GFCI device into a surge protector provides no protection.
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#95
Quote from Mike C View Post :
-super long post-
I feel your pain man. Our house is wired like crap must be original wiring from 1940. Kitchen, dining room, and bathroom is all on the same small breaker. Toaster+Blow Drying hair = instant popped circuit breaker -.-
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#96
Quote from Thadius856 View Post :
Surge protectors must be plugged into GFCIs.

Plugging a GFCI device into a surge protector provides no protection.
I would assume that one would be plugging a surge protector into the GFCI (since what was discussed here is an outlet), not the other way around. I'm assuming that's OK then, correct? Thanks.
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#97
Quote from BigJ2078 View Post :
For your two countertop SABCs (Small Appliance Branch Circuits, you may not have two in an older kitchen), you generally have a GFCI on each circuit that feeds receptacles downstream of the device. As long as the GFCI is the first device and everything else is connected to the load side of the GFCI, you're protected by the GFCI.

Leviton does not limit the number of receptacles that can be connected to the load side of a GFCI.

Something people need to be very aware of is that these are NOT Tamper Resistance GFCIs. Depending on your local code, you may be required to install Tamper Resistant receptacles in a number of situations, including anything from new construction (most common if your AHJ has adopted some recent form of the NEC), to simply replacing an existing receptacle.
Why the need for tamper resistant GFCI in a residence? I thought tamper resistant is more for public places to prevent random people from tampering with the device with a makeshift screwdriver or whatnot. Who in your own home would you not trust? Maybe I'm not exactly sure what tamper proof is supposed to prevent
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#98
Quote from chintuk1 View Post :
Noob question. I have an indoor heater that uses 12.5 Amps. Occasionally my circuit breaker trips. If I plug the heater into one of these outlets, will this trip just the outlet and not the entire circuit??
Quote from Thadius856 View Post :
Depends where the GFCI is on the circuit path and how sensitive it is to overdraw compared to your breaker in the main panel. So that's a "maybe", depending on several factors.

The fact that a 12.5 amp heater is tripping a circuit is a bigger concern if it's on a circuit by itself.
Isn't he simply putting too much onto the circuit breaker? I thought you're only supposed to put 80% of the rating onto any circuit. 80% of 15 amps is 12 amps. He's above that...

edit: also, don't these two things do different tasks? Don't circuit breakers prevent over-current (which is why it's tripping with that much current) whereas GFCIs detect a difference of voltage between the hot and neutral? Both will break the circuit but for different reasons. For instance, if I have my HTPC and my television on, turning on my microwave will trip the circuit because it draws too much power (old condo that is super small and those two plugs are on the same circuit). I have to turn off my television (power-hungry 59" plasma) to use the microwave.

Quote from Samwise Gamgee View Post :
Is GFCI outlets a DIY thing?

I don't mean the outlet itself, but the circuity behind it, in the wall.

Doesn't the circuitry need to be special somehow?
No not really. To connect a GFCI to house wiring is exactly the same as a standard, grounded outlet (you have a hot, a neutral, and a ground wire). These just have some internal circuitry which will detect a difference between the hot and neutral and will trip if that exceeds a certain amount (5 milliamps I think*)
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#99
Quote from RUsum1 View Post :
Why the need for tamper resistant GFCI in a residence? I thought tamper resistant is more for public places to prevent random people from tampering with the device with a makeshift screwdriver or whatnot. Who in your own home would you not trust? Maybe I'm not exactly sure what tamper proof is supposed to prevent
Kids. Plain and simple. Also prevents the chocking hazard associated with the safety plugs that have been around forever.

Not saying I agree with the rule, but it is a rule.

Here's some literature from the NFPA:
http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.as...kie_test=1
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#100
Quote from BigJ2078 View Post :
Kids. Plain and simple. Also prevents the chocking hazard associated with the safety plugs that have been around forever.

Not saying I agree with the rule, but it is a rule.

Here's some literature from the NFPA:
http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.as...kie_test=1
Didn't think of children, but that would make me think that EVERY outlet/switch would need to be tamper proof if that was really the reason. A GFCI isn't more dangerous behind-the-scenes
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#101
Quote from RUsum1 View Post :
Didn't think of children, but that would make me think that EVERY outlet/switch would need to be tamper proof if that was really the reason. A GFCI isn't more dangerous behind-the-scenes
Every new residential outlet that is 120v and 15A or 20A does need to be TR (tamper-resistant) according to recent revisions of the NEC (2008+). Your local code may be different, so you'd have to consult your AHJ about what situations they need to be used (new construction, remodel, replacing, etc). In my original post, you'll notice that after I stated these weren't TR GFCIs, I talked about receptacles, not just GFCIs.
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#102
Quote from RUsum1 View Post :
Isn't he simply putting too much onto the circuit breaker? I thought you're only supposed to put 80% of the rating onto any circuit. 80% of 15 amps is 12 amps. He's above that...

edit: also, don't these two things do different tasks? Don't circuit breakers prevent over-current (which is why it's tripping with that much current) whereas GFCIs detect a difference of voltage between the hot and neutral? Both will break the circuit but for different reasons. For instance, if I have my HTPC and my television on, turning on my microwave will trip the circuit because it draws too much power (old condo that is super small and those two plugs are on the same circuit). I have to turn off my television (power-hungry 59" plasma) to use the microwave.
I'm not going to get into all of the rules (there's different rules for lighting, fixed in-place appliances, cord-and-plug, etc), but the general rule is as follows:

If a circuit has non-continuous loads, you can load it up 100%.
If a circuit has any continuous loads, that load must be rated at 125%. So a continuous load of 10A is calculated as 12.5A. The sum of the continuous + non-continuous loads must be under the rating of the circuit.

For example, an electric hot water heater is considered a continuous load. We'll use the example of a 4500W unit. 4500W/240V = 18.75A. You would think that you could use 12AWG wire for this, since it has an ampacity rating of 20A. However, since it is a continuous load, we have to multiply by 125%. This puts us at 23.44A, requiring 10AWG wiring, with a 25A/30A Double-pole Circuit Breaker.
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#103
anyone get this shipped? my order is still Being Processed since thursday
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#104
Quote from shadowgerm View Post :
anyone get this shipped? my order is still Being Processed since thursday
I'm to get mine tomorrow.
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#105
I'm not an electrician and was wondering where can I find advice online on how to hook up two of these through a box to a 10 gauge cable coming from the rv plug of my generator?
I got 30 amp out of the ttr30 Rv plug and wonder how to setup the 3 wires 10 gauge cable to 2 of these outlets (pig tails?) so that I get 15 amp on each to attach a power strip to each to power light appliance like tv and light during a black out.
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