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Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet (3-Pack) EXPIRED

tukwok 5,684 3,276 November 8, 2012 at 12:24 PM in Home & Home Improvement (2) More Home Depot Deals
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$18.50

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Promoted 11-08-2012 by iconian at 01:59 PM View Original Post
Home Depot has Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet (3-Pack) for $18.50 + free shipping. Thanks tucwok
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Edited November 8, 2012 at 12:26 PM by tukwok
Bring your home or rental(s) up to code or replace any that became damaged or defective.

Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet, White (3-Pack)

$18.00 /EA-Each limit 10 per order
WAS $28.35
Online Special Valid : 11/08/2012 - 11/08/2012
Free Shipping
[homedepot.com]

Help protect your family from electrical shock by installing SmartlockPro GFCIs. The National Electrical Code requires GFCIs in bathrooms, kitchens, basements, garages, workshops, and laundry rooms. GFCIs can be damaged over time; they must be tested monthly to ensure they are providing proper protection.


Specially designed circuits offer superior surge protection
Cannot be reset if miswired (line/load reversal only) or if GFCI protection is compromised
Backwire feature for easy installation
Installs in place of standard outlet
Backwire feature for easy installation
Cannot be reset if miswired with a line/load reversal or if GFCI protection is compromised
CSA and UL listed
MFG Brand Name : Leviton
MFG Model # : M22-07599-03W
MFG Part # : M22-07599-03W
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105 Comments

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#31
Quote from eldy View Post :
I see what you did there! LMAO
I see you're not as smart as you think you are. Redundancy is not always unnecessary.
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#32
Thx got one, repped
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#33
Quote from aggravated View Post :
I see you're not as smart as you think you are. Redundancy is not always unnecessary.
My apologies, Mr. Man. Big Grin
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#34
Quote from auxiliary View Post :
can i swap out regular socket with one of these? I dont' have one of these near my bathroom sink and i think i should. Though i heard something about if you have a few of them in your kitchen they tend to be all connected so if one trips they all trip. Make me wonder.
For your two countertop SABCs (Small Appliance Branch Circuits, you may not have two in an older kitchen), you generally have a GFCI on each circuit that feeds receptacles downstream of the device. As long as the GFCI is the first device and everything else is connected to the load side of the GFCI, you're protected by the GFCI.

Leviton does not limit the number of receptacles that can be connected to the load side of a GFCI.

Something people need to be very aware of is that these are NOT Tamper Resistance GFCIs. Depending on your local code, you may be required to install Tamper Resistant receptacles in a number of situations, including anything from new construction (most common if your AHJ has adopted some recent form of the NEC), to simply replacing an existing receptacle.
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Last edited by BigJ2078 November 8, 2012 at 03:17 PM
#35
That's a good price. In for one.
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#36
How does one know which outlet is the first one on a circuit? On new construction that is easy, but in an old house? I could guess by which is closest to the breaker box, but is that always the case?

Is there a test that could be done (safely) to make sure an outlet is downstream and protected?
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Last edited by DuckFan34 November 8, 2012 at 03:32 PM
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#37
hug
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Last edited by SoCalTiger68 November 8, 2012 at 03:54 PM

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#38
There certainly is a "first" outlet in a chained circuit. That would be the GFCI connected directly to the circuit breaker box. All further outlets on that chain must be fed from the "load" side of the GFCI.
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#39
Quote from eldy View Post :
I see what you did there! LMAO
Hope so...
Sometimes multiple redundancy IS appropriate or necessary. Especially in regards to safety.
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#40
Noob question. I have an indoor heater that uses 12.5 Amps. Occasionally my circuit breaker trips. If I plug the heater into one of these outlets, will this trip just the outlet and not the entire circuit??
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#41
Quote from SoCalTiger68 View Post :
This is really a misnomer. There is no such thing as a "first" (or "last") outlet in a circuit in the sense you are thinking of. A break in the circuit at any point will break the entire circuit. You just need to install in one outlet per circuit.
This is not true at all. The first outlet (in this case, the outlet would be a receptacle) in a circuit refers to the device that feeds any other outlets from the load side of the outlet. This is an example of what is referred to as series wiring, and is generally not advised unless for some reason you must feed the outlets from the load side of a device (like in the case of down stream GFCI or Surge Protection).

In household wiring, you have parallel wiring. From this, you can wire in parallel or in series. Parallel wiring generally involves pig-tailing, so that if a device upstream fails, the devices downstream of that point at not jeopardized. If there is a failure at any point in the circuit, the other devices will not lose power. In series wiring, they most certainly would.
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#42
Quote from BigJ2078 View Post :
This is not true at all. The first outlet (in this case, the outlet would be a receptacle) in a circuit refers to the device that feeds any other outlets from the load side of the outlet. This is an example of what is referred to as series wiring, and is generally not advised unless for some reason you must feed the outlets from the load side of a device (like in the case of down stream GFCI or Surge Protection).

In household wiring, you have parallel wiring. From this, you can wire in parallel or in series. Parallel wiring generally involves pig-tailing, so that if a device upstream fails, the devices downstream of that point at not jeopardized. If there is a failure at any point in the circuit, the other devices will not lose power. In series wiring, they most certainly would.
Thanks for the clarification. Deleting my post.
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#43
Quote from chintuk1 View Post :
Noob question. I have an indoor heater that uses 12.5 Amps. Occasionally my circuit breaker trips. If I plug the heater into one of these outlets, will this trip just the outlet and not the entire circuit??
A GFCI does not provide over-current protection. A GFCI and OCPD (Over-current Protection Device) have two very different functions.
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#44
Can anyone explain why this is a deal? There seem to be 20A for roughly the same price-per-unit as someone pointed out. Anything special about this brand?

P.S. It's been a few years since my EE classes, and I don't practice. Anyone know if there's harm in using 20A GFCI for 15A circuits?

EDIT: I imagine there won't be, but wondering why people wouldn't go for the 20A version if that were the case.
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#45
Quote from house kitten View Post :
Coffee maker, toaster, microwave, mixer, refrig, etc. all require their own ckt.
That is not true. Code requires a minimum of two Small Appliance Branch Circuits for the kitchen. Refrigerator may need its own circuit depending on code cycle. Microwave only needs a dedicated circuit IF it is built-in.
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