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Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet (3-Pack) EXPIRED

tukwok 5,684 3,276 November 8, 2012 at 12:24 PM in Home & Home Improvement (2) More Home Depot Deals
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Promoted 11-08-2012 by iconian at 01:59 PM View Original Post
Home Depot has Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet (3-Pack) for $18.50 + free shipping. Thanks tucwok
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Edited November 8, 2012 at 12:26 PM by tukwok
Bring your home or rental(s) up to code or replace any that became damaged or defective.

Leviton SmartLockPro 15 Amp Duplex GFCI Outlet, White (3-Pack)

$18.00 /EA-Each limit 10 per order
WAS $28.35
Online Special Valid : 11/08/2012 - 11/08/2012
Free Shipping
[homedepot.com]

Help protect your family from electrical shock by installing SmartlockPro GFCIs. The National Electrical Code requires GFCIs in bathrooms, kitchens, basements, garages, workshops, and laundry rooms. GFCIs can be damaged over time; they must be tested monthly to ensure they are providing proper protection.


Specially designed circuits offer superior surge protection
Cannot be reset if miswired (line/load reversal only) or if GFCI protection is compromised
Backwire feature for easy installation
Installs in place of standard outlet
Backwire feature for easy installation
Cannot be reset if miswired with a line/load reversal or if GFCI protection is compromised
CSA and UL listed
MFG Brand Name : Leviton
MFG Model # : M22-07599-03W
MFG Part # : M22-07599-03W
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#61
Quote from karazi View Post :
Whoever spelled it LeviTRON on the front page ought to correct it.
I mod-alerted this 10 minutes ago. I guess data integrity isn't important.
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#62
[QUOTE=tukwok;54586148]Bring your home or rental(s) up to code ...

Current code requires tamper-proof outlets, including GFCI.

I think we'll see a lot of sales like this one for non tamper-proof outlets
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#63
Why is it trying to charge me $18.50 instead of $18 !?
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#64
I just replaced all my light switches in my house and I bought it new in 97. It had this Leviton brand for all the switches and wall plugs. Many of my old switches didn't work and some just fell apart as I was replacing them. I will never buy Leviton from my own experience.
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#65
11/8 only? Thanks OP!
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#66
Quote from DuckFan34 View Post :
How does one know which outlet is the first one on a circuit? On new construction that is easy, but in an old house? I could guess by which is closest to the breaker box, but is that always the case?

Is there a test that could be done (safely) to make sure an outlet is downstream and protected?
Here's what I did to find the "first" outlet in my "old" house with two conductor wiring (note ALL three bedrooms were on the SAME circuit):
a) Open Breaker the on Circuit you want to install the GFCI outlet on.
b) Check which outlets don't have power and note which ones they are.
c) Choose one of the outlets (wise to choose the one closest to the circuit breaker) and take off its cover.
c.1) If there only 1 set of wires connected to it, you've chosen poorly and it's the LAST outlet in the circuit
c.2) If there are two sets of wires connected to it, disconnect the set *not* labelled "breaker" or "upstream" or something similar and make sure the disconnected wires can't touch each other or any metal (I just put twist on wire connectors on the end of *each* of the wires separately... if you were thinking of twisting them all together then... I'd suggest you hire a professional.) If there are no labels, choose one set randomly.
d) Close the breaker on the circuit.
e) Check the outlet you chose in step C.
e.1) If it still has power, you've disconnected the correct set of wires go to step e.2... if it doesn't you've disconnected the incorrect set of wires, walk back over to the circuit breaker, open it, label the bundle of disconnected wires "upstream" or whatever you prefer and disconnect the OTHER set of wires and go to step d)
e.2) Check which outlets you noted down in step b) still have power. If they all are without power, you've found the first outlet in the circuit, goto step f). Else turn off the circuit breaker and choose one of the outlets *with* power and goto step c)
f.) Turn off the circuit and replace the outlet with a GFCI outlet and reconnect everything you disconnected.

If you feel uncomfortable doing ANY of this, just bite the bullet and hire a licensed electrical contractor to do it. They'll have tools that will allow them to find the "first" outlet in the circuit without disconnecting things.

I was replacing all the receptacles with Decora ones, so had to disconnect all of them anyways, so didn't bother trying to detect which ones were closer to the breaker box without disconnecting them.
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Last edited by bbf November 8, 2012 at 06:23 PM
#67
Quote from WilsonT View Post :
Anyone know if there's harm in using 20A GFCI for 15A circuits?

EDIT: I imagine there won't be, but wondering why people wouldn't go for the 20A version if that were the case.
The 20Amp receptacle has a horizontal tab in it that the 15A ones don't. This is to prevent a device that requires a 20A circuit from being plugged into a 15A circuit. If you put a 20A receptacle on a 15A circuit, you bypass this protection and risk overloading your 15A circuit.
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#68
replaceing a lot of leverton gfis they are pieces off crap

go for 20 amp one
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#69
Quote from Shade00 View Post :
GFCIs are generally the only way to replace 2-prongers with 3-prong outlets when you don't have a ground wire. In for a couple.... great deal, as I definitely need these
Thanks! I need to do that in my apartment and had no idea that a GFCI would be the thing to use (I don't think I have a reliable ground point available, so I was agonizing about what to do about it).
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#70
Quote from lotsalotsadeals View Post :
GFCI circuit breakers for the Win!
Not necessarily. I think as they get older they will get a little flaky, just like GFCI receptacles. Its a heckuva lot easier and cheaper to replace a GFCI receptacle than breaker.

I have a GFCI breaker for my pool equipment since all of it is hardwired, but I use GFCI receptacles anywhere hands might end up (not just in bathrooms, but any outlet by a light switch, etc)
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#71
Quote from house kitten View Post :
Each circuit. You are asking for trouble if you have 8 outlets on 1 15A ckt in a kitchen. Coffee maker, toaster, microwave, mixer, refrig, etc. all require their own ckt.



Better go get more
Man, I sure wish who ever renovated my home had gotten a good electrician and followed those f'ing rules. A huge renovation to the tune of $500K, 2x the value of the house currently(so he invested $750K in the house), I got a steal on it at less than 1/3rd of that. He pretty much wasted his money, wrong neighborhood to put in 20K granite counter tops, black Italian marble floors, etc., but it sure is cool to have Smilie. The guy who lived here before me got hit and disabled by FedEX truck(FedEX's bad), the settlement set him for life, so while he was waiting the 1.5 years for his new "mansion" to be built, he spent half a mill on his current one(now mine), I got it the day it hit the market, made asking price offer after about 30 min tour, and they accepted (i.e we had contract) an hour before someone else before someone else bid $40K more than their asking price, whew, right place, right time Smilie). Anyway, he added awesome pool, hot tub, complete new kitchen, ALL new bathrooms, out door kitchen, bigger garage with workshop, awesome whole wall entertainment center, a master bathroom bigger than my last houses master bedroom, and 2 walkin closets off of the master bathroom that are both considered bedrooms by code (they are roughly 15x15, and have f'ing windows and celing fans, and the closets HAVE CLOSETS in them Smilie), I could go on and on.

Here is the fun part. What ever electricians were subcontracted were either lazy, morons, or both, and either they bribed the code inspector, or he didn't do his job either. Because they basically tripled all of the outlets and power draws, etc., and they WAY ran out of room with the houses old main breaker panel. So what did they do? They just moved stuff around, and piggy backed several circuits on pretty much every breaker(i.e. I found some breakers with 5 LARGE circuits on them!). They didn't even install tandem breakers(2 breakers that fit in one slot for those that don't know), they just left the standard single breakers, AND they didn't upgrade the amperage on any of them, just used the ones that were originally with the house. The worst was that my ENTIRE kitchen, outdoor kitchen, main living room, AND garage (which has freezer, grinders, and other hi draws, etc.) was on ONE 20 A circuit. I got a few tandems as a short term fix to split out those circuits, because we couldn't open the fridge and use the toaster oven while we were watching TV, etc., etc. but have A LOT more to do :/.

So if you ever have issues with popping breakers in your house, open your main breaker panel to see if you see more than one white wire running to the breaker that is popping, a tandem breaker(s) is a super easy fix to split those circuits and see if that fixes it (turn off your main breaker into the home on top usually before swapping out the breakers and wiring up the tandem though to be safe and not get fried). If only one wire, then you can get a test kit to figure out how many things are on the one circuit for that breaker it at you favorite DIY store (Lowe's, Home Depot) like this one: http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5...Jxe_YdX3zg (and add this accessory so you can track all of your lighting as well: http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5...JxfaIdX3zg ). Bring a mobile device and an xls (or old school paper notepad Smilie), to record every single outlet and which breaker it is going to.

If you get lucky, you may find that you have a 1500W heater or something plugged into the wall on one circuit that shares other high loads, and there is another place to plug it in on a different circuit and problem solved.

If you find too many and don't have the easy load relocation potential (or if your breaker is a 10A or 15A, how high you can go mainly depends on gauge and type of wiring for safety (no fire) reasons through the ENTIRE circuit, so don't just get a 20 or higher amp breaker to fix the problem or you may regret it when your house burns down Frown, you gotta make sure that the entire circuit is wired appropriately FIRST (which most of the time should be the case unless a lazy electrician did the wiring). Then, you can either save a lot of $ by telling a hired electrician exactly what your issue is and see what he recommends (depends on how/where the circuit is wired on what makes sense, splitting the circuits or upping the breaker after ensuring the whole circuit wire path is appropriate).

To go even further on making your home always juice ready and safe:

I bought a new panel with quite a few more slots and a transfer switch built in from Amazon for $350 [amazon.com](a steal even at the $400 price now if you are thinking of getting a whole home genny, considering what it is vs. separate xfer switch on the feed side (normally 100A/200A xfer swith that is upstream of your main breaker, size depending on your feed from ELEC company) and a bigger panel(~$600 or more for both), especially given I can put generator run loads on one top and the rest on another, vs. a whole home xfer switch where I (and you, unless you buy a monster whole home genny) would have to install delayed start switches and/or shunts for all big loads, which would be many hundred $ more.

Also got a Honeywell whole home NG 18kW NG generator(20kW LP) from Costco for $3K on sale (again a steal, basically the same Generac you pay $4.5K+ for at Lowe's, except the Honeywell has 5 yr warranty vs. Gnerac 3 and then of course Costco with warranty forever Smilie). NG is awesome given while where I live (and most places that I know of) have electrical power loss for days or longer (east coast atm Frown) is fairly common(I have been without electricity for a wweek or longer more than once here due to tornados and super cell thunderstorms), but I have never heard of loss of NG when these same things happen, or rather it is a 1 in a million thing from what I have read, usually when someone does something stupid like dig where they aren't supposed to without getting permit and survey and get really unlucky and hitting an NG line. Only thing better would be on premises buried HUGE LP tank, no can do at my house, not place to put it Frown. That is only usually an option for folks with a bit of land around their house and it is also a relatively large investment, although that makes you COMPLETELY autonomous(until your LP tank runs dry anyway), which is nice.

The point here is that with all of these natural disasters, backup power generation is awesome (and dear goodness, not gasoline driven unless you have to, LOUD as heck, and REALLY expensive to run for days at a time at $4 a gallon, and unless you get a good one, their power regulation SUCKS, meaning you may toast some of your appliances running on it), it mayn't be a bad idea to add generator to your slick deal alerts Smilie.

Anyway, long ways to get back to the point of the thread and some of the questions I see... I haven't replaced my panel yet and installed the generator, because I have been mapping out the madness that is the wiring and circuits at my house and redoing all of that first. Before people start bitching I shouldn't be messing with my home electrical, I was DOE certified Nuke electrician in Navy, so this is piece of cake vs. working on 480V 3 phase triple redundant systems(meaning you gotta turn off 3 things to cut power to something), and I have licensed electrician friend who will take care of the legal inspection crap since I am not certified in my state. In order to do this work, I have an extensive home electricians discovery, mapping, testing, and installation toolset including GFI tester, etc., and have been retrofitting everything back up to code including GFIs. All of the tools I needed were a few hundred to buy, but I get to keep them vs. the thousands I would have to pay an electrician to do the same work, and it is fun too Smilie.

Anyway, DEFINITITELY don't go lower than 20A for GFIs assuming the breaker on the circuit is also AT LEAST 20A, and given most of the places that require GFIs are the same places that have the high power draw devices either on startup (fridge compressor) or all the time (hair drier), hopefully this is the case. If there is a short/ground fault, then 20A will pop just as fast as 15A, except you may find your 15As popping under normal usage (I had to replace half of my houses GFI's with 20As for this exact reason, the other half were already 20's).

In my case, I have GFIs on every outlet in my house in the rooms that require it(or where I use things that I think should be GFI protected) and TBH I didn't really look into code specs on if that is necessary or not, nor did I test a regular outlet with my GFI tester to see if another GFI on the same circuit would pop (i.e. I don't know if the GFIs are designed to pop based on over current on what is plugged in ONLY, or over current on what is flowing THROUGH it even if nothing is plugged into it). I would do it now, but I don't know where my kit is, my basement is piles upon piles of huge ass boxes from SDs over the last months (printers, cases, etc. gaaa), so once I find my elec toolbox, I will try that and see what happens. I think for my house both things will happen, as I have found both series wired chained outlets AND parallel wired outlets :/. I am retrofitting to be all parallel, meaning I will need all GFIs anyway.

One thing I do know, I have not had a single issue with having every outlet in all of the required rooms being GFI's, nor should there BE a reason for that to cause a problem(unless you have a bad GFI outlet on the circuit), it is basically having multiple breakers on a single circuit vs. just one, and for a healthy circuit with no overload issues, that won't be a problem. I have roughly 10 GFI's on one circuit in the kitchen for the small (but thirsty appliances) to give an idea, NOT ONE pop.

EDIT: I am not going to fix my whole post, but where I mention GFI outlets and over current, that is my using wrong terminology, I just noticed that as I was rereading. GFI (Grond Fault Isolation) protects against issues where there is a ground fault caused by device plugged into the outlet, vs. breakers are the ones responsible for protecting circuits from overcurrent draw. Bigger picture, they are both safety devices that save either devices from damage, people from electrocution, or homes from catching on fire when there are issues relating to power delivery throughout your home.
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Last edited by Mike C November 8, 2012 at 07:50 PM
#72
Quote from nolf66 View Post :
I just replaced all my light switches in my house and I bought it new in 97. It had this Leviton brand for all the switches and wall plugs. Many of my old switches didn't work and some just fell apart as I was replacing them. I will never buy Leviton from my own experience.
Leviton makes more than one grade of switches, outlets, etc.

If you spring for the switches that are more than 2.00, you'll get a decent product (I think they are labelled "heavy duty"). Their 20A stuff is even better....with the contacts that dont require a loop, rather they have the "guillotine" type where the screw pulls down a metal plate and captures the wire leads.

Im guessing in 97 they used the "git er done" method and put what was cheapest. Fancy dancy name is "builder quality" Smilie
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#73
Quote from house kitten View Post :
Correct, always 20A for us.
I concur use the same 20 breaker as well.
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#74
Quote from damnthatsadeal View Post :
I concur use the same 20 breaker as well.
If you are talking about buying using only 20A GFI's, you should only say that if the circuit has a 20A breaker. If 15A breaker (pretty rare for rooms where GFIs are needed, although I have seen it for bathroom circuits for some stupid reason), then use 15A GFIs.
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#75
Quote from bbf View Post :
Here's what I did to find the "first" outlet in my "old" house with two conductor wiring (note ALL three bedrooms were on the SAME circuit):
a) Open Breaker the on Circuit you want to install the GFCI outlet on.
b) Check which outlets don't have power and note which ones they are.
c) Choose one of the outlets (wise to choose the one closest to the circuit breaker) and take off its cover.
c.1) If there only 1 set of wires connected to it, you've chosen poorly and it's the LAST outlet in the circuit
c.2) If there are two sets of wires connected to it, disconnect the set *not* labelled "breaker" or "upstream" or something similar and make sure the disconnected wires can't touch each other or any metal (I just put twist on wire connectors on the end of *each* of the wires separately... if you were thinking of twisting them all together then... I'd suggest you hire a professional.) If there are no labels, choose one set randomly.
d) Close the breaker on the circuit.
e) Check the outlet you chose in step C.
e.1) If it still has power, you've disconnected the correct set of wires go to step e.2... if it doesn't you've disconnected the incorrect set of wires, walk back over to the circuit breaker, open it, label the bundle of disconnected wires "upstream" or whatever you prefer and disconnect the OTHER set of wires and go to step d)
e.2) Check which outlets you noted down in step b) still have power. If they all are without power, you've found the first outlet in the circuit, goto step f). Else turn off the circuit breaker and choose one of the outlets *with* power and goto step c)
f.) Turn off the circuit and replace the outlet with a GFCI outlet and reconnect everything you disconnected.

If you feel uncomfortable doing ANY of this, just bite the bullet and hire a licensed electrical contractor to do it. They'll have tools that will allow them to find the "first" outlet in the circuit without disconnecting things.

I was replacing all the receptacles with Decora ones, so had to disconnect all of them anyways, so didn't bother trying to detect which ones were closer to the breaker box without disconnecting them.
Thanks for the info. That is exactly what I was looking for!

Repped!
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