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Upgrading my Toshiba Satellite C655D-S5209

collegestudent941 10 November 29, 2012 at 12:07 PM
Hey guys, last year I purchase my first laptop. So far the only problem I have with my laptop is it's really slow, with AMD dual core E-350 processor and 3 GB RAM. I just recently purchased a intel SSD (a pretty good deal from here) and should be replacing my hard drive soon.

So the question is, is it advisable that I should also upgrade my RAM? I'm looking to put in 8 GB RAM for my laptop (the maximum it can support from the manufacturer's website). What kind of RAM should I use? There are so many components to the RAM that I'm not familiar with, such as DDR, SDRAM, ECC and non ECC, 10600 vs 12800 vs 8500, unbuffered vs buffered. What would be the best option if I can upgrade? Thank you for your response. look around

21 Comments

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#2
I don't think that upgrading the memory would help.

The SSD is the best upgrade you can do and really is the only one worth doing.
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#3
dhc is right.
Adding ram will do nothing for you.
There would be two reasons that your laptop is slow and the most predominant is your processor that is outright weak.
To put it into perspective, it is 1/3rd the power of a basic low end Intel i3.
Your machine can never be fast, no matter what, however an SSD could radically improve things so that it would be acceptable.
The 2nd reason is that the system is not tweaked to maximize performance.
Take screenshots of the processes running in the background after a fresh bootup and post them here and we'll be able to suggest which ones to remove from the start up list.
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#4
Depending upon the typical workload of this machine, it might very well benefit from a ram upgrade, particularly given that the Radeon 6310 takes hold of a minimum of 384MB (more when pushed to do anything significant), though going to 8GB is probably not worth it, both from a performance standpoint, and from the standpoint of its price relative to the value of your machine. SOmething like this [newegg.com] will take your machine to 6GB (Your machine contains one 2GB module and one 1GB, be sure to replace the 1GB with the 4GB).

Again, however, whether and how much RAM with affect the performance will depend upon your workload. The more you do at once (programs open at the same time, stuff running in the background, number of tabs open, etc), the more you will see a benefit from a RAM upgrade. As others have mentioned, however, upgrading to an SSD is the most significant performance improvement you can make.

For reference, what you need is a NON-ECC, unbuffered, DDR3, SO-DIMM (i.e. laptop size) memory (the speed and timing differences among them are insignificant, at least as far as your machine is concerned)
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#5
you need unbuffered non-ecc laptop (204 pin) ddr3 ram - speed isn't that important, and I don't see you accidentally getting buffered or ecc ram, as those are a bit more expensive and mostly server/desktop oriented

like the others said, ram upgrade won't do much unless you do Photoshop work or run VM's
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#6
Quote from hbarnwheeler View Post :
Depending upon the typical workload of this machine, it might very well benefit from a ram upgrade, particularly given that the Radeon 6310 takes hold of a minimum of 384MB (more when pushed to do anything significant), though going to 8GB is probably not worth it, both from a performance standpoint, and from the standpoint of its price relative to the value of your machine. SOmething like this [newegg.com] will take your machine to 6GB (Your machine contains 1 2GB module and 1 1GB, be sure to replace the 1GB with the 4GB).

Again, however, whether and how much RAM with affect the performance will depend upon your workload. The you do at once (programs open at the same time, stuff running in the background, number of tabs open, etc), the more you will see a benefit from a RAM upgrade. As others have mentioned, however, upgrading to an SSD is the most significant performance improvement you can make.
I'm not sure if you are familiar with the relationship of the CPU and how much ram the system will use, but the short of it is that for that machine with the AMD E-350 processor it has, it would paralyze by way of the CPU before ever managing to use all 4 gigs it has, even with no pagefile,
You'd have to find a very special program to ever require more than 4 gigs from that laptop.
In theory, what you say makes sense to a certain degree, but it shows that you have not played with an E-350 computer, as it's barely more powerful than an Intel powered netbook.
The only reason the manufacturers put 4 gigs into those notebooks, is for show. It sounds good. 4 gigs of ram !!! Yippee !!!
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#7
I'm not sure what you mean by "relationship of the CPU and how much ram the system will use," but RAM usage and CPU usage are functionally independent, at least in the following sense: A machine will use whatever RAM is available before swapping, regardless of the speed of the CPU. Information resident in RAM is accessed more quickly than that in a page file.

I do agree than an E-350 is anemic and is going to be a bottleneck when straightforward computation is the issue. If you're saying that it is so anemic that it renders the difference between fetching from swap vs fetching from memory practically moot because the CPU is the bottleneck in every scenario where this would happen, I am skeptical. However, I have never used a system with the E-350 and it sounds like you have, so I am happy to defer to your judgement.
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#8
Thanks everyone for your input. I use this laptop mostly for school work and email, but it's just way too slow, sometimes opening up a word or power point cause it to lag. Even going to gmail or hotmail occasional takes a minute before it respond. I'll just reduce the RAM to 6 GB and maybe that would help just a little bit.

As for RockySosua, how do I take a screen shot of my back ground start up programs?
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#9
Quote from collegestudent941 View Post :
Thanks everyone for your input. I use this laptop mostly for school work and email, but it's just way too slow, sometimes opening up a word or power point cause it to lag. Even going to gmail or hotmail occasional takes a minute before it respond. I'll just reduce the RAM to 6 GB and maybe that would help just a little bit.

As for RockySosua, how do I take a screen shot of my back ground start up programs?
When we mention the uselessness of adding more ram, we don't mean that it would be harmful so if you've decided to upgrade the ram anyhow, 6 or 8 will make little difference and there's certainly no need to reduce to 6.
SCREENSHOT.
Press the "prt sc" key on your keyboard, then open Paint and paste the screenshot in, then save the image, then when you post, add said screenshot as an attachment.
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#10
Quote from collegestudent941 View Post :
Thanks everyone for your input. I use this laptop mostly for school work and email, but it's just way too slow, sometimes opening up a word or power point cause it to lag. Even going to gmail or hotmail occasional takes a minute before it respond. I'll just reduce the RAM to 6 GB and maybe that would help just a little bit.

As for RockySosua, how do I take a screen shot of my back ground start up programs?
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
When we mention the uselessness of adding more ram, we don't mean that it would be harmful so if you've decided to upgrade the ram anyhow, 6 or 8 will make little difference and there's certainly no need to reduce to 6.
SCREENSHOT.
Press the "prt sc" key on your keyboard, then open Paint and paste the screenshot in, then save the image, then when you post, add said screenshot as an attachment.
I agree that adding more memory likely won't help. if the OP posts a screenshot we can see if he is even using all his memory. My guess is he is not. We don't even know if the OP has a 64bit OS. My guess is the computer has a 32bit OS, so while the motherboard is capable of supporting 8gb of ram, the operating system is not. 32bit OS can only support 4gb including any video memory.

An SSD will help some but it won't be amazing. The real problem with this computer is probably it's loaded down with running software and it has a quite low end processor. It's power is close to a 7 year old Pentium 4.

If this was my system and a new machine was not an option I would do the following. Since you bought a SSD, install it and then install a new version of Windows. Load bare minimums, and start saving for a new computer. For what you described using this machine it should work despite being low power.
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#11
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
I agree that adding more memory likely won't help. if the OP posts a screenshot we can see if he is even using all his memory. My guess is he is not. We don't even know if the OP has a 64bit OS. My guess is the computer has a 32bit OS, so while the motherboard is capable of supporting 8gb of ram, the operating system is not. 32bit OS can only support 4gb including any video memory.
It's 64-bit.
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#12
You'll get all the performance benefits with that SSD. More RAM combined with that CPU won't "help" that much in area of smoother user experience.
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#13
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
When we mention the uselessness of adding more ram, we don't mean that it would be harmful so if you've decided to upgrade the ram anyhow, 6 or 8 will make little difference and there's certainly no need to reduce to 6.
SCREENSHOT.
Press the "prt sc" key on your keyboard, then open Paint and paste the screenshot in, then save the image, then when you post, add said screenshot as an attachment.
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
I agree that adding more memory likely won't help. if the OP posts a screenshot we can see if he is even using all his memory. My guess is he is not. We don't even know if the OP has a 64bit OS. My guess is the computer has a 32bit OS, so while the motherboard is capable of supporting 8gb of ram, the operating system is not. 32bit OS can only support 4gb including any video memory.

An SSD will help some but it won't be amazing. The real problem with this computer is probably it's loaded down with running software and it has a quite low end processor. It's power is close to a 7 year old Pentium 4.

If this was my system and a new machine was not an option I would do the following. Since you bought a SSD, install it and then install a new version of Windows. Load bare minimums, and start saving for a new computer. For what you described using this machine it should work despite being low power.
this is my computer spec
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#14
Quote from collegestudent941 View Post :
this is my computer spec
This is the type of screenshot we need, of the processes running in task manager right after bootup.
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#15
Here it is again.
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