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Pogoplug Classic Media Sharing Device (P21 Black or B01 Pink) EXPIRED

DJ3xclusive 73,418 December 28, 2012 at 08:01 AM in Computers (5) More eBay Deals
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Promoted 12-28-2012 at 04:48 PM View Original Post
Adorama via eBay has Pogoplug Classic Media Sharing Device (P21 Black or B01 Pink) for $17 with free shipping. Thanks DJ3xclusive

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Edited December 28, 2012 at 01:46 PM by widgit

385 Comments

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Joined Jan 2013
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#346
just one morea quick question from you archlinux geniuses here. Say i've shared a full usb drive (/mnt/Disk1). I've set myself as the only one with write permission. I have another read only account. Now say I have a folder in Disk 1 (/Disk1/Backup) that i only want to be able to access/view with my login, and the other samba user i have (pcguest) should not be able to view the contents of the folder. If the folder is hidden, great, but its not necessary. I just don't want others to be able to view the contents of that folder.

How do i work that?
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Joined Sep 2006
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#347
Quote from Zank View Post :
On average my transfer rate is 22 minutes for a 10 gb file.

Also anyone got sabnzbd instructions?
10GB/22min = 10*1024 MB / 22 / 60sec = 7.75MB/sec. That's good enough for 1080p playback. I have listed several real time monitoring tools in my previous post. To accurately measure the file transfer speed you just need the correct file size and a good stop watch. Or you can try something like DUmeter on windows.

The only tricky thing about sabnzbd installation is the permissions. Make sure you have sabnzbd installed:
# pacman -Qs sabnzbd
if the info shows up as result then you already have sabnzbd installed.

If not, you have to get it from AUR (Arch User Repository). In this case installing a AUR package manager/broker will save some time (for now and in the long run) and I like yaourt. It's like other package managers such as yum, apt, emerge which can automatically search and install the required dependencies for the package you want to install.

Here is how to install yaourt:

Be sure that your system time is sync'ed with the time server pool otherwise the certificate may not be working when yaourt tries to use wget to get the stuff from https hosts. (I simply create a systemd script `ntpd -gq` so the system's time is always adjusted when it boots up - too lazy to use ntp client as a service or use cron).

yaourt install:
1. # pacman -Sy wget base-devel yajl ed
2. # wget https://aur.archlinux.org/package...ery.tar.gz
3. # tar zxvf package-query.tar.gz
4. # cd package-query
5. edit PKGBUILD and change arch type to "any"
6. # makepkg --asroot PKGBUILD
7. # pacman -U <package.xz>
7. # wget https://aur.archlinux.org/package...urt.tar.gz
8. # tar zxvf yaourt.tar.gz
9. # cd yaourt
10.# makepkg --asroot PKGBUILD
11.# pacman -U <package.xz>
Feel free to delete everything that was downloaded or created during the above steps after the software is up and running.

the steps also show how to install packages from the source by using PKGBUILD file. It's easier than compiling from the source (./configure; make; make install) and you have a package at the end so it makes removing the package cleaner and easier if you don't want it.

To install sabnzbd simply do
# yaourt -Sy sabnzbd
and follow the script's instruction to get it done.

The default sabnzbd base path is /opt/sabnzbd if you get it from AUR. Make sure /opt/sabnzbd and all the subdirectories is owned by the user you use to run sabnzbd. You can find that info in /usr/lib/systemd/system/sabnzbd.service, the location is where all the start/stop scripts used by systemd to control the software.

Use the following command to change the ownership of an entire folder and everything in it:
# chown -R nobody.nobody /opt/sabnzbd
//change the ownership to nobody user and nobody group

there may be other locations for sabnzbd files such as /etc/conf.d/ but in this case only /opt/sabnzbd needs attention (if I remember correctly). Sickberad is a whole different deal because it doesn't have a base directory so the files are all over the place.
To check all the files installed from a package:
# pacman (or yaourt) -Ql <package name> | less

After that you are all set, just start the service (# systemctl start sabnbzd) and go to the webpage (http://<IP>:8080/sabnzbd (the port number is listed in /opt/sabnzbd/sabnzbd.ini) and set all the configuration options before you start to have fun with it.

Performance note: pogo's 256MB ram obviously is not enough for lots of things, one of them is too many job queue in sabnzbd. They could be from sickbeard or other sources. We don't want to use too much drive space for cache either because of the flash drive short life cycle. You just have to test out the best settings for your own system.
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#348
Quote from Zank View Post :
just one morea quick question from you archlinux geniuses here. Say i've shared a full usb drive (/mnt/Disk1). I've set myself as the only one with write permission. I have another read only account. Now say I have a folder in Disk 1 (/Disk1/Backup) that i only want to be able to access/view with my login, and the other samba user i have (pcguest) should not be able to view the contents of the folder. If the folder is hidden, great, but its not necessary. I just don't want others to be able to view the contents of that folder.

How do i work that?
You could try setting that folder up itself as a share in the .conf file after your initial share. Jus set it up as if it was it's own independant share with the perms u want and that might override the preceding access rules.
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Joined Jan 2013
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#349
Quote from crakarjax View Post :
You could try setting that folder up itself as a share in the .conf file after your initial share. Jus set it up as if it was it's own independant share with the perms u want and that might override the preceding access rules.
Jst tried that with options write list = username and read list = username but its still accessible to everyone.
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#350
Quote from Zank View Post :
Jst tried that with options write list = username and read list = username but its still accessible to everyone.
Via SO:
I'm thinking "veto files" is the option you're looking for.
add the line in smb.conf under the particular share to exclude sub-directories explicitly

[myshare]
path = /var/test
veto files = /var/test/private
more syntax examples here: http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/m...#VETOFILES
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Joined Jan 2013
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#351
Quote from crakarjax View Post :
Via SO:
I'm thinking "veto files" is the option you're looking for.
add the line in smb.conf under the particular share to exclude sub-directories explicitly

[myshare]
path = /var/test
veto files = /var/test/private
more syntax examples here: http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/m...#VETOFILES
yep this sounds about right. But this will hide this veto'ed directory to all users though wont it? I just went over the samba.org link you sent me, and theres no mention of how to allow certain users to access veto'ed directories. I just want to be able to hide the directory (or make it inaccessible) to user pcguest and htpc, but make it accessible (read+write) to my own login (compadmin). Any suggestions on that?
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Joined Jan 2013
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#352
thanks...giving this a shot now.

I did see the statistics tools you listed (iostat was one of them i think) and all say command not found. so i will install those.

a few questions on the san setup:

Pacman vs yaourt. i thought pacman was infact a package manager...isnt that what we were doing with all those packman -Sy package name commands? Or are they different "repositories" of packages? anyway ofcourse I'm going to follow your instructions down to a dot but just asking out of curioisty.

"
Use the following command to change the ownership of an entire folder and everything in it:
# chown -R nobody.nobody /opt/sabnzbd
//change the ownership to nobody user and nobody group
"

i know one of the previous configs (samba or hfs) you had also mentioned nobody user and nobody group. I am not clear what that means. do you mean i should replace nobody.nobody with my own username and groupname? Or is that a generic linux term to make sure everything is controlled only by admin? anywhere i see nobody nobody mentioned (and ive seen it in a few guides) should i just leave it at as mentioned?




Quote from teetee1 View Post :
10GB/22min = 10*1024 MB / 22 / 60sec = 7.75MB/sec. That's good enough for 1080p playback. I have listed several real time monitoring tools in my previous post. To accurately measure the file transfer speed you just need the correct file size and a good stop watch. Or you can try something like DUmeter on windows.

The only tricky thing about sabnzbd installation is the permissions. Make sure you have sabnzbd installed:
# pacman -Qs sabnzbd
if the info shows up as result then you already have sabnzbd installed.

If not, you have to get it from AUR (Arch User Repository). In this case installing a AUR package manager/broker will save some time (for now and in the long run) and I like yaourt. It's like other package managers such as yum, apt, emerge which can automatically search and install the required dependencies for the package you want to install.

Here is how to install yaourt:

Be sure that your system time is sync'ed with the time server pool otherwise the certificate may not be working when yaourt tries to use wget to get the stuff from https hosts. (I simply create a systemd script `ntpd -gq` so the system's time is always adjusted when it boots up - too lazy to use ntp client as a service or use cron).

yaourt install:
1. # pacman -Sy wget base-devel yajl ed
2. # wget https://aur.archlinux.org/package...ery.tar.gz
3. # tar zxvf package-query.tar.gz
4. # cd package-query
5. edit PKGBUILD and change arch type to "any"
6. # makepkg --asroot PKGBUILD
7. # pacman -U <package.xz>
7. # wget https://aur.archlinux.org/package...urt.tar.gz
8. # tar zxvf yaourt.tar.gz
9. # cd yaourt
10.# makepkg --asroot PKGBUILD
11.# pacman -U <package.xz>
Feel free to delete everything that was downloaded or created during the above steps after the software is up and running.

the steps also show how to install packages from the source by using PKGBUILD file. It's easier than compiling from the source (./configure; make; make install) and you have a package at the end so it makes removing the package cleaner and easier if you don't want it.

To install sabnzbd simply do
# yaourt -Sy sabnzbd
and follow the script's instruction to get it done.

The default sabnzbd base path is /opt/sabnzbd if you get it from AUR. Make sure /opt/sabnzbd and all the subdirectories is owned by the user you use to run sabnzbd. You can find that info in /usr/lib/systemd/system/sabnzbd.service, the location is where all the start/stop scripts used by systemd to control the software.

Use the following command to change the ownership of an entire folder and everything in it:
# chown -R nobody.nobody /opt/sabnzbd
//change the ownership to nobody user and nobody group

there may be other locations for sabnzbd files such as /etc/conf.d/ but in this case only /opt/sabnzbd needs attention (if I remember correctly). Sickberad is a whole different deal because it doesn't have a base directory so the files are all over the place.
To check all the files installed from a package:
# pacman (or yaourt) -Ql <package name> | less

After that you are all set, just start the service (# systemctl start sabnbzd) and go to the webpage (http://<IP>:8080/sabnzbd (the port number is listed in /opt/sabnzbd/sabnzbd.ini) and set all the configuration options before you start to have fun with it.

Performance note: pogo's 256MB ram obviously is not enough for lots of things, one of them is too many job queue in sabnzbd. They could be from sickbeard or other sources. We don't want to use too much drive space for cache either because of the flash drive short life cycle. You just have to test out the best settings for your own system.
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Joined Sep 2006
L6: Expert
909 Reputation
#353
Quote from Zank View Post :
thanks...giving this a shot now.

I did see the statistics tools you listed (iostat was one of them i think) and all say command not found. so i will install those.

a few questions on the san setup:

Pacman vs yaourt. i thought pacman was infact a package manager...isnt that what we were doing with all those packman -Sy package name commands? Or are they different "repositories" of packages? anyway ofcourse I'm going to follow your instructions down to a dot but just asking out of curioisty.

"
Use the following command to change the ownership of an entire folder and everything in it:
# chown -R nobody.nobody /opt/sabnzbd
//change the ownership to nobody user and nobody group
"

i know one of the previous configs (samba or hfs) you had also mentioned nobody user and nobody group. I am not clear what that means. do you mean i should replace nobody.nobody with my own username and groupname? Or is that a generic linux term to make sure everything is controlled only by admin? anywhere i see nobody nobody mentioned (and ive seen it in a few guides) should i just leave it at as mentioned?
yaourt and pacman share all the usual parameters (ex. -Sy for installation) but it has the ability to access AUR and make packages from PKGBUILD file automatically if the target package requires any dependencies.

nobody is a non-privileged system user (also has its own group: nobody). Several services use it (by default) to run the service programs (instead of using root account) such as samba, nfs, and sabnzbd (you can always change them to whatever account you like in the configuration files or systemd scripts). Take a look at /etc/passwd and /etc/group, get familiar with the format by comparing other users and you will know it's just a normal user account and no different then others (except the default shell for nobody is disabled so you can't log into the system with "nobody" account).

You have been doing a lot of linux stuff in the past couple of weeks and it's easy to get overwhelmed. Just step back and relax a little and give it some time to digest.
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Joined Dec 2006
L5: Journeyman
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#354
Quote from teetee1 View Post :
The most ancient linux command will work just fine if you want to clone your current system drive to another thumb drive for backup:
The backup thumb drive (say it's /dev/sdd) will have to be larger than the original and all existing data on that drive will be wiped after running this command.. You can imagine if the wrong target drive was accidentally used (like your 2TB drive) then all data on that drive will be gone.
# dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdd
// all content on /dev/sda will be cloned to /dev/sdd (sector to sector copy)

More refined command parameters are stated in another archwiki:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index....sk_Cloning




nfs use rpc call protocol for file transfer which is totally independent from samba protocol, you can have both nfs and samba working and sharing the same mounted partition and as matter of fact that's what most people do (nfs for unix/linux file sharing and samba for windows/mac sharing on the same server and same mount point).

Here is your step-by-step, free-of-charge, foolproof, miracle-less nfs setup:

On nfs server (pogoplug):
1. Install nfs package:
# pacman -sy nfs-utils

2. Edit /etc/idmapd.conf, the only thing you want to change is the "Domain" name, it doesn't have to be the real DN (domain name), just something that's unique.
--- idmapd.conf ----
[General]
Verbosity = 1
Pipefs-Directory = /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs
Domain = SDRULES

[Mapping]
Nobody-User = nobody
Nobody-Group = nobody

[Translation]
Method = nsswitch
------------------------------

3. Edit /etc/exports file. Here /mnt/DISK1, /mnt/DISK2, /mnt/DISK3, /mnt/DISK4 are used for mount point and the source for nfs sharing to 192.168.1.0/24 subnet:
---- exports ---
/mnt/ 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,fsid=0,no_subtree_check,all_squash)
/mnt/DISK1 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,no_subtree_check,all_squash)
/mnt/DISK2 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,no_subtree_check,all_squash)
/mnt/DISK3 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,no_subtree_check,all_squash)
/mnt/DISK4 192.168.1.0/24(rw,sync,no_subtree_check,all_squash)
--------------------

4. Start nfs server:
# systemctl start rpc-idmapd rpc-mountd

5. Verify the server is running:
# showmount -e
clnt_create: RPC: Program not registered
//means nfs server is NOT running

# showmount -e
Export list for SDRULES:
/mnt/DISK4 192.168.1.0/24
/mnt/DISK3 192.168.1.0/24
/mnt/DISK2 192.168.1.0/24
/mnt/DISK1 192.168.1.0/24
/mnt 192.168.1.0/24
//means nfs server is running
//Done with the NFS server side configuration

5. Client setting (linux):
- Install nfs package:
# pacman -sy nfs-utils

- check to see if the linux client can get the nfs server to show all nfs shares:
$ showmount -e <nfs server name or IP address>

- mount the share (make sure the folder for the mount point is ready on the client. ex. /mnt/DISK1 )
# modprobe nfs
//load nfs module into the kernel. For some reason it didn't do that automatically on my box
//to load the module at boot, do the following:
# echo 'nfs' > /etc/modules-load.d/nfs.conf

//To verify the nfs module is loaded:
# lsmod
nfs 283858 0
nfs_acl 2185 1 nfs
auth_rpcgss 34590 1 nfs
lockd 66145 1 nfs


// now mount the nfs share from the nfs server on the client by the command below (on the client):
# mount -t nfs4 <server name or IP>:/DISK1 /mnt/DISK1
//and put it into /etc/fstab once you are sure the above command works:
--- nfs entry in /etc/fstab ---
<server name or IP>:/DISK1 /mnt/DISK1 nfs4 noauto,users,async 0 0

I use "noauto" option simply because I don't want my pogo(my nfs client) to hang at boot if the nfs share is not available but it could be me worrying over nothing.

I have never tried to mount nfs share on windows or mac so you will have to google them yourself but it can't be too difficult.
this worked great for me. thanks a lot.

i have a question though. my shares are unmounting themselves after a few hours of inactivity (from my ubuntu desktop, not the pogoplug). i have hdparm -S 120 /dev/sdb set in my /etc/rc.local file to automatically spin the drives down after 10 minutes. is that what's causing it?

so, basically, i have the drives attached to the pogoplug, and then share them via nfs to an ubuntu server that i have plex media server installed on, so that i can use plex. the solution works fine, but the problem im having is that the shares are unmounting from the ubuntu server after a while.

does anyone have plex media server on the pogoplug? i thought about it, but i dont think it's powerful enough to transcode mkv files to my ps3, that's why i have it set up like this.

you might wonder why i dont just have the drives running from the ubuntu server, and that's because i only turn on the server when i want to watch something with my ps3. if i want to watch on my computer or something else, then watching straight from the pogoplug works fine.
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#355
Quote from teetee1 View Post :
to prevent the neverland boot situation because the drive in fstab list isn't there during boot you can use "noauto [tuxfiles.org]" option in fstab so it doesn't mount during boot but you can put a systemd start-up script to mount them.

For real time automount through udev there are more to dig in the archwiki udev section [archlinux.org].
could you explain in further detail what you mean by the start up script, or provide an example? i've never written a script and wouldnt know how to launch one with systemd/systemctl

thanks
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#356
Quote from heiNey View Post :
this worked great for me. thanks a lot.

i have a question though. my shares are unmounting themselves after a few hours of inactivity (from my ubuntu desktop, not the pogoplug). i have hdparm -S 120 /dev/sdb set in my /etc/rc.local file to automatically spin the drives down after 10 minutes. is that what's causing it?
I have never used the hdparm -S parameter for drive spin-down so I can't know for sure. You can simply compare the effect of removing the command from rc.local file, reboot nfs server and see if the nfs share disappear (unmount) after a few hours. Most of the USB external hard drive will spin themselves down without the hdparm command but I haven't had any nfs share unmount automatically on me yet. They will simply start spinning as soon as I access the content on the drive from the nfs client.

Quote from heiNey View Post :
could you explain in further detail what you mean by the start up script, or provide an example? i've never written a script and wouldnt know how to launch one with systemd/systemctl

thanks
I followed the explanation below for my start-up script on systemd pogo+arch:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index....vice_files
http://unix.stackexchange.com/que...or-systemd

for example, to sync and adjust system time during boot, simply install and update the ntp package and enable the uptdate.service
# systemctl enable ntpdate.service

You can read the content of the ntpdate.service file at
/usr/lib/systemd/system/ntpdate.service
--
[Unit]
Description=One-Shot Network Time Service
After=network.target nss-lookup.target

[Service]
Type=oneshot
PrivateTmp=true
ExecStart=/usr/bin/ntpd -q -g -u ntp:ntp
ControlGroup=cpu:/

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target
--

and I think it has the exact same effect of simply run # ntpd -qg
from the command line prompt (one-time only, not really a service).

You will have to use cron / cronie on arch if you want to run things at certain time repeatedly (like sync and adjust system time with the ntp time server pool every 12 hours), it's like the scheduled tasks in windows:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Cron



for the old rc.d system, simply put the command or the script in /etc/rc.local:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index....2Frc.local

for example, to sync and adjust system time during boot, add the following line to /etc/rc.local ( for rc.d systems):

/usr/bin/ntpd -qg

// https://wiki.archlinux.org/index....col_daemon
// ntpd -qg requires fully updated ntp package
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#357
Quote from Zank View Post :
yep this sounds about right. But this will hide this veto'ed directory to all users though wont it? I just went over the samba.org link you sent me, and theres no mention of how to allow certain users to access veto'ed directories. I just want to be able to hide the directory (or make it inaccessible) to user pcguest and htpc, but make it accessible (read+write) to my own login (compadmin). Any suggestions on that?
I was thinking that you could use veto to exclude the private folder, and then create an additional entry just for that one folder with tighter permissions.
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#358
Quote from crakarjax View Post :
I was thinking that you could use veto to exclude the private folder, and then create an additional entry just for that one folder with tighter permissions.
so what i ended up doing was creating another entry for the backup as a share, and then just inputting my username in valid users, read list and write list parameters.

working for now.
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#359
Quote from teetee1 View Post :

You have been doing a lot of linux stuff in the past couple of weeks and it's easy to get overwhelmed. Just step back and relax a little and give it some time to digest.

thanks so much for the help. i know it can be frustrating helping less experienced/totally ignorant people with this stuff...couldnt have done this without your help. I have everything humming close to perfect now. Quite the feeling of accomplishment learning all this. I will have the server on and ssh into it just to see what other funky stuff i can do with this.

Couple of other things i wanted to get working and have been experimenting with:

hdparm. downloaded via pacman but hdparm -i and hdparm -y or hdparm -Y dont seem to be working for my external usb enclosure. it says putting drive to sleep/standby but my drive is still humming. Maybe its because its an old program meant to work with ide drives? WOuld be nice to be able to set something up to put my drives to sleep when not in use to save electricity and also keep away extra drive wear and tear.

Another thing was i've got everything automounting perfectly for my currently configured drives. But is there a way to get any drive i plug in to automatically be configured as a samba share, instead of explicitly configuring it in smb.conf? sorry we've talked so much abuout automount that i have a feeling of dejavu. were these part of some previous instruction set?
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#360
Quote from teetee1 View Post :
I have never used the hdparm -S parameter for drive spin-down so I can't know for sure. You can simply compare the effect of removing the command from rc.local file, reboot nfs server and see if the nfs share disappear (unmount) after a few hours. Most of the USB external hard drive will spin themselves down without the hdparm command but I haven't had any nfs share unmount automatically on me yet. They will simply start spinning as soon as I access the content on the drive from the nfs client.
i dont know what's going on, but removing hdparm from rc.local and it's still unmounting itself.

is it possible to have a cron job run every 6 hours to remount these shares? seems more like a band-aid solution, but idk any other way to fix this.

Code:
0 */6 * * * mount -t nfs4 IP.ADDRESS:/share1 /mnt/share1
would something like that work?
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