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1-Year Nature Magazine Subscription (51 Issues) EXPIRED

nanotube 176 January 4, 2013 at 07:49 PM in Books & Magazines (4)
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$36

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Promoted 01-06-2013 at 12:00 AM View Original Post
Nature.com is offering a 1-Year Nature Magazine Subscription (51 Issues) for $35.82. Thanks nanotube

Original Post

Edited January 29, 2013 at 08:44 PM by nanotube
To celebrate Nature's new impact factor of 36.280, Nature is offering a 1-year personal multi-access subscription for $36 (or 36 euro, or 36 UK$ depending on location):

nature.com/dec36

(Not available in Asia)

For the price you get 51 issues in print, online papers, full access in their iPad and iPhone app (otherwise subscription required) and occasional journal supplemental booklets/special issues.

This is one of the best price I've seen at 82% off. Even if you have institutional subscription through work/university, the copies make excellent coffee table material. Original price is $200 per year, or $99 for student, $119 for postdoc.

*The above link says valid until Oct 2012 but the postcard I just received says offer ends in January, 2013. Just placed an order without a problem.

Update Jan 29th: received a promotion email about the same $36 deal with a new link, it now says valid until March 2013:
http://www.nature.com/content/nat..._ONLINESUB

94 Comments

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#46
Quote from guruguru View Post :
Thanks! I was just looking to subscribe to this a few days ago.

Renew immediately for a second year for another $36.
It looks like you can renew an infinite amount of times. Just stay logged into your account and click the main link and it will offer to renew instead of a new sub.

Nothing like getting 3 years of Nature in print for the regular price of the student edition.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#47
I read scientific journals all the time, and let me assure you that with the exception of a couple of "introductory" articles, most of the journal will be filled with pretty dense stuff (even for those with a college degree). Don't expect this to be like popular mechanics.
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#48
in for a sub... thank you!
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#49
Quote from bud914 View Post :
i'll bite. looks like a good magazine
Quote from 2000backup View Post :
I read scientific journals all the time, and let me assure you that with the exception of a couple of "introductory" articles, most of the journal will be filled with pretty dense stuff (even for those with a college degree). Don't expect this to be like popular mechanics.
It's a great magazine, for the right audience. This isn't fluff like Scientific American. It's a real scientific journal. It and Science are the journals that scientist strive to publish in. It's the big time. Although there has been backlash against the great Elsevier empire's high costs.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science...r-elsevier
http://politics.slashdot.org/stor...esearchers

Here's the rub. Most research in the US is funded by the federal government, NIH/NSF. That research is published in the likes of Nature and then people are required to pay to get access to it. So the taxpayers are forced to pay for something they already paid for.

Back in the day. People in lab would piss and moan about Elsevier. There was/is even a free alternative to it which worked out so well that I can't remember the name anymore. To be honest, in the age of the internet, where pubication costs are effectively free. There's no reason why there can't be peer reviewed publications online for free. The scientific community just has to embrace it and forego the "honor" of being published in the likes of Nature. The internet revolution has yet to hit the sciences.
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#50
99.9% of the institutions have free subscriptions to CNS
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#51
Does this magazine have pictures of snakes? If so then I should probably get it because I really like snakes.

Also, does magazine come with those perfume inserts? I like those too.
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#52
Quote from jhaan2 View Post :
Library? Whats that? Www.nature.com should be free for you at your school.
You sound like a first generation all-digital person but for most of us, reading a pdf online is not the same experience as holding the print on hand and read it. Don't get me wrong; I do read pdf of journal articles online more often than in print. Anyone in the research field knows that the best way to find and cite relevant articles is to browse online but Nature and Science are the two journals that I also like to browse and read in print.
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#53
impressive find at this price
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#54
Quote from travfar View Post :
It's a great magazine, for the right audience. This isn't fluff like Scientific American. It's a real scientific journal. It and Science are the journals that scientist strive to publish in. It's the big time. Although there has been backlash against the great Elsevier empire's high costs.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science...r-elsevier
http://politics.slashdot.org/stor...esearchers

Here's the rub. Most research in the US is funded by the federal government, NIH/NSF. That research is published in the likes of Nature and then people are required to pay to get access to it. So the taxpayers are forced to pay for something they already paid for.

Back in the day. People in lab would piss and moan about Elsevier. There was/is even a free alternative to it which worked out so well that I can't remember the name anymore. To be honest, in the age of the internet, where pubication costs are effectively free. There's no reason why there can't be peer reviewed publications online for free. The scientific community just has to embrace it and forego the "honor" of being published in the likes of Nature. The internet revolution has yet to hit the sciences.
I feel your sentiment. But I guess a majority of researchers still are covered by institutional subscriptions, which in part were paid for by indirect costs (overheads) in their research funding.

Also to clarify, NIH's public access policy mandates funded research publications to be available for free. But not necessarily in the specific journal's format. For example a paper on Nature still needs payment to be accessed. But if it's funded in any part by NIH, it will show up on Pubmed for free, in full text, within 6 months, but without all the formatting or sometimes in manuscript format. Nature has the IP right to its editing and formating and there is a price to it. But the raw, unformatted paper is still free.

NSF is similar - public has the right to access research data generated by the funded research and use them for non-commercial purpose. But data != published paper, for those you need to get from the publisher.

And of course in some discipline there is the old and trusted arxiv.org.
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#55
Does this magazine have comics or cross-word puzzles?
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L3: Novice
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Original Poster
#56
Quote from skhomer View Post :
if only i can publish in there now
Dream big, dude, it won't be too far away.

For many years I dreamed "if only i can publish a frontpage deal now......" and look ma, I did it.
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#57
I would thumbs down this because the prices paid for freely submitted material is ridiculous. What they publish is free, the reviewers and editors all do it for free. It is a racket which is outdated and should not be supported.
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#58
Quote from nanotube View Post :
Also to clarify, NIH's public access policy mandates funded research publications to be available for free. But not necessarily in the specific journal's format. For example a paper on Nature still needs payment to be accessed. But if it's funded in any part by NIH, it will show up on Pubmed for free, in full text, within 6 months, but without all the formatting or sometimes in manuscript format. Nature has the IP right to its editing and formating and there is a price to it. But the raw, unformatted paper is still free.
And that is exactly what Elsevier is trying to stop. They supported a bill in Congress that would have banned the NIH from giving it away for "free". "Free" in this case meaning paid for by the US taxpayer.

"Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it free — well, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier's backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act. Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research."

It's ridiculous. The US taxpayer funds the research in a lab to the tune of millions. Then a publication claims rights to that research at the very last step. Did they pay a penny for that research. Nope. But just to get the scientific laurels for it, the researchers give them the rights to it. Why the US taxpayer doesn't own and thus profit from the research they paid for is beyond me. At a minimum they should have access to the work they paid for.
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#59
Quote from w00dst0ck View Post :
Awesome deal, but in all honesty I'm not sure why most people would buy it. Those who are interested in Nature are usually going to be students/postdocs/faculty in academia who already have access to online Nature through their university. It's really not a layman's magazine and even professors in the prime of their career won't fully understand half of the articles because they will be fairly far from their area of expertise. The articles are required to be short (compared to other academic journals) so every sentence is impactful, making them fairly dense reads. The title and the abstract is probably as far as most people get (including those in academia).

Anyway, that's just my two cents.
Quote from yourwhiteshadow View Post :
that's exactly what i was thinking, i don't know why this is FP. its not like popular science or scientific american...
Pop-science mags like popular science and sci-am are too diluted. Academic journals (particularly the big names like Science, Nature, JAMA) give you all the depth, but in a format that lets you sink into it as deeply as you wish.

I like reading the abstracts, skimming the research details, and enjoy the editorial content.
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#60
Quote from travfar View Post :
And that is exactly what Elsevier is trying to stop. They supported a bill in Congress that would have banned the NIH from giving it away for "free". "Free" in this case meaning paid for by the US taxpayer.

"Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it free — well, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier's backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act. Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research."

It's ridiculous. The US taxpayer funds the research in a lab to the tune of millions. Then a publication claims rights to that research at the very last step. Did they pay a penny for that research. Nope. But just to get the scientific laurels for it, the researchers give them the rights to it. Why the US taxpayer doesn't own and thus profit from the research they paid for is beyond me. At a minimum they should have access to the work they paid for.
Hold your pitchfork~~~ that bill was defeated. NIH funded papers are still free.

And again, taxpayers get access to the research in other formats. Publishers don't claim the research, only the publishing rights of said journal paper because they have costs. If you argue ANY and ALL forms of publication of data must be free, what do you say when they charge you for copy of a PhD thesis from a university library?
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