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Panasonic LUMIX DMC-LX7 10MP Digital Camera w/ 24mm F1.4 Lens & 1080p Video EXPIRED

Chimi 202 February 10, 2013 at 08:46 AM in Tech & Electronics (6) More JR.com Deals
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$289

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Promoted 02-10-2013 at 01:34 PM View Original Post
Update: Black is temporarily out of stock, but it's still available in white

J&R has Panasonic LUMIX DMC-LX7 10MP Digital Camera w/ 24mm F1.4 Lens & 1080p Video (Black or White) for $299 (must add to cart & login) - $10 with coupon code ATJANDR = $289 + free shipping. Thanks Chimi

Price Research: Our research indicates that this Panasonic LUMIX DMC-LX7 10MP Digital Camera is $59 lower (17% savings) than the next best available price from a reputable merchant with prices starting at $348. - iconian

Hands-on review courtesy of Engadget

Original Post

Very highly rated camera. Prices dropped this morning...has been at $450 and now it's the lowest ever.

http://www.jr.com/panasonic/pe/PAN_DMCLX7K/

Add to cart and apply code ATJANDR

Free slow shipping. I added 2-day UPS for another $2.

Review: Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras [dpreview.com]

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Joined Nov 2007
L8: Grand Teacher
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#61
Quote from Psygnius View Post :
I'm planning on running the footage through twixtor to emulate higher FPS. So how is the sharpness? Can you set the shutter speed to 1/500th or 1/1000th sec while recording?
LX7 can't adjust while recording video, get the rx100 if you serious video and want compact. you can adjust all the setting with the full manual control work while recording video, VQ not to mention is also better, the IS on sony in second to none. Don't take my word from it many other who is doing video work for living would tell you samething bout rx100.
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Joined Oct 2011
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#62
Quote from okinawanmatt View Post :
I've temporarily owned three Panasonic Lumix cameras on the recommendations of SDers. I forgot the model of the first one I owned, but then I purchased the SZ1 [amazon.com] and the ZS6 [amazon.com].

Never again.

I exclusively used the Casio Exilim line for several years before switching to Panasonic point-and-shoots, because for a long while, the Casio Exlilim line was the only "mainstream" camera to produce the smallest point-and-shoots that had a combination of quality and features. It was fantastic, but the early models lacked optical image stabilization. I also owned a [model unkown] Konika-Minolta DiMage camera, which was a great competitor to the thin/small point-and-shoot line from Canon.


I used Canon Powershots for a year, and it was adequate. They had fantastic image stabilization but produced grainy pictures when the auto-mode decided to bump up the ISO.


For the past few years, SD has been inundated with threads from users gushing about their experience with Panasonic Lumix cameras. I bought one to experiment with, used it for a week, and gave it away as a gift. I don't remember the model, but it was comparable to a Canon Digital Elph entry-level camera. I noticed the optical image stabilization was pretty bad on it.


Last year (or maybe two years ago), Woot.com had a sale on the refurbished Panasonic Lumix ZS6 [amazon.com]. It was retailing for nearly $380, but could be purchased for $130 from Woot that day. That thread on SD went straight to the front page, with everyone cheering it on as the best alternative to a DSLR. I received a chunky, brick-like camera that was missing the GPS chip (the description stated it had GPS, but apparently Panasonic ships two models; one with, and one without a GPS tagger). I was pleasantly surprised with daylight shots, but it wasn't until I tried night time shots that I realized that the camera's sensors were no different than an entry-level Canon Elph series camera. While the ZS6 touted a Carl Zeiss lens, I had to find out the hard way that a good lens is still meaningless if the CCD sensor cannot handle it's task. Anything above ISO 600 was grainy, and optical image stabilization was nearly non-existent, just like my previous Panasonic Lumix. I decided to stop by my local Best Buy to test their ZS6 model, in case my 'refurbished' model was actually damaged. Unfortunately, it gave me the same results.

A month ago, I purchased a Panasonic Lumix SZ1 [amazon.com] from Staples during their famous nation-wide camera clearance (with additional savings from a coupon - street price $190, sale price $68). Although this camera was bought as a gift, I had two weeks to use it for testing before I gave it away. It had the same problem as my previous two Lumix models: grainy shots at medium ISO and poor image stabilization.


When I speak of poor image stabilization, I compare it to my later-generation Casio Exilim (when they started introducing that feature) and the Canon Elph line. The Exlim model from 2007 had about the same stabilization as the 2012 Panasonic Lumix SZ1, wherein a slight shake from pressing the shutter button could be negated, but a strong push on the shutter button that moves the hand a few millimeters would ruin the entire photo in a blur of colors. That means that the 10x zoom would be useless, since at that range, even a steady hand couldn't compensate for the slight jitter of depressing a shutter button. The Panasonic Lumix models are put to shame when compared with an entry-level Canon Elph model. With the Canon, I could even be in motion and it would still take a shot without blur! For example, if you're walking along at 4MPH and start snapping photos without stopping, the entry-level Canon Elph line from 2009 could take blur-less photos once out of every three photos.


So, in owning the Panasonic Lumix entry-level to mid/high-level point-and-shoots, I've learned that this line of cameras are consistent in two ways: poor image processing for anything above 600 ISO, and poor optical image stabilization.

Now, I also have two other cameras. I have the Canon Rebel T2i DSLR [amazon.com] for work, and the Nikon Coolpix P510 [amazon.com] that I also picked up a month ago during the Staples clearance sale (original street price $350, sale price $175). The Canon T2i is what you would expect from an entry-level DSLR - great for almost any type of photo. It has slightly better image stabilization than the Panasonic Lumix, but not much. However, the surprise of my life was the Nikon Cooplix P510! That beast has a mean optical stabilization. When coupled with the ridiculous zoom (42x optical zoom!), you can take a picture of something a mile away and get a GREAT photo without any blur. Ranging from the 42x zoom that can take perfect photos, a macro that can take 1cm close photos (the user manual states 2cm, but I can get about 0.9cm with manual focus), the fantastic Nikkor lens coupled with an incredible CMOS sensor, the P510 blew my mind and is my camera of choice now. I'm going to start trying out the different lines of Nikon cameras, and may switch my work camera to a Nikon series if their professional DSLR lines are as impressive as their consumer line point-and-shoots.

Cameras owned/reviewed:
 
Company - Casio
Model - Exilim EX-S1, EX-ZS10, [unknown]
Price - $150-280
Year - 2002-2011
Quality - GOOD
 
Company - Canon
Model - Digital Elph [unknown entry level]
Price - $150
Year - 2009
Quality - GOOD
 
Company - Panasonic
Model - Lumix ZS6, SZ1, [unkown]
Price - $68-200 (street - $380)
Year - 2009-2012
Quality - POOR
 
Company - Canon
Model - Rebel T2i
Price - $700
Year - 2010
Quality - VERY GOOD
 
Company - Nikon
Model - Coolpix P510
Price - $175 (street - $350
Year - 2012
Quality - VERY GOOD
I'm not sure what bearing your experiences with prior, and sometimes refurbished Panasonic cameras has on this thread. If you think your individual experience with 0.01% of the Panasonic cameras sold should indict an entire line of cameras, you think too highly of yourself.

For anyone interested in an actual review of this camera from a professional, I suggest going here [dpreview.com]. The takeaway from the conclusions page:

The Lumix DMC-LX7 is Panasonic's flagship compact camera, and the long-awaited follow-up to the popular DMC-LX5. At first glance, it's hard to tell the two apart, but look closer and you'll see some pretty big changes. The DMC-LX7 is a mid-sized camera made mostly of metal. Build quality is good in most respects, though I wasn't a fan of the cheap-feeling rear dial, which doesn't turn smoothly. As is usually the case, the plastic door over the battery/memory card compartment is flimsy, as well. The LX7 fits well in your hand, thanks to a right hand grip that's, well, just right. The biggest feature on the camera is undoubtedly its F1.4-2.3, 3.8X Leica zoom lens (equivalent to 24 - 90 mm). This is the fastest lens you'll find on a compact camera.

Panasonic has put an aperture ring around the lens, which allows you to quickly adjust this setting when in A and M mode. The LX7 also features Panasonic's Power OIS image stabilization system, to reduce the risk of blurry photos and jumpy videos. On the back of the camera is a 3-inch LCD with 920,000 dots (twice that of the LX5) that is easy to see both outdoors and in low light. If you want to use an electronic viewfinder, Panasonic offers a pretty nice one. An external flash and various lens filters are also available as accessories.

The LX7 has a very nice collection of features that should make just about everybody happy. If you're a 'set it and forget it' kind of person, then look no further than Panasonic's great Intelligent Auto mode. It literally takes care of everything for you, whether its picking a scene mode, avoiding blur, handling back-lit situations, or intelligently sharpening an image. The LX7 has a large collection of scene modes, plus numerous special effects (known as Creative Controls). Two scene modes of note include Panorama Shot and HDR. The former will let you 'sweep' the camera from side-to-side, with an automatically stitched panorama arriving a few seconds later. Unfortunately, all of my panoramas had vertical banding in them, which I hope Panasonic can fix via firmware update. The HDR feature is point-and-shoot (meaning that you can't adjust the exposure interval), but it does result in much better-looking photos when your subject is strongly back-lit.

As you'd expect from this premium compact, there are plenty of manual controls on the LX7, too. You get all the usual exposure options, RAW support, lots of white balance options, and three types of bracketing. Another feature I like is called Intelligent Resolution, which I think noticeably improves the look of the LX7's already stellar images. The DMC-LX7 also has a fully loaded movie mode, which allows you to record Full HD video at 1080/60p, with stereo sound, for up to 30 minutes. You can use the optical zoom and image stabilizer while recording, and continuous autofocus is available, as well. If you to adjust the aperture, shutter speed, or ISO in movie mode, it's totally doable on the LX7.

The DMC-LX7's performance is top-notch in nearly every area. It starts up in just 1.1 seconds, focuses very quickly, and takes the photo as soon as you press the button. Shot-to-shot delays are minimal, even if you're using the RAW format or taking a flash photo. The LX7 has a variety of burst modes, with the two most notable being the 5.5 fps with continuous AF and 11 fps options. The camera has a large amount of buffer memory, so quite a few photos can be taken before things slow down. The only areas in which the camera lags are buffer flush times (30+ seconds when shooting bursts of RAW images) and zoom speed (the lens moves at a snail's pace). While battery life has dropped considerably since the LX5, it's still tied for the top spot in the premium compact group.

Photo quality on the Lumix DMC-LX7 is excellent. The camera takes well-exposed photos, without too much highlight clipping (though it will occur at times). Colors are nice and saturated, and accurate in most situations (the LX7 still struggles a bit in artificial light). The LX7's lens is definitely high quality, with good sharpness across the frame. If you want things a bit sharper than what the camera produces by default, you can use the Intelligent Resolution feature I mentioned earlier. The LX7 has very little noise and thankfully no detail smudging at low ISOs. It keeps noise levels low through ISO 400 in low light and ISO 1600 in good light, both of which are better than what you'll find on a typical compact camera. One issue that the DMC-LX7 unfortunately has is redeye, despite its two features designed to prevent it.

Overall, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 is an excellent premium compact camera. Its fast lens, performance, and manual controls will make enthusiasts drool, while those just starting out can get great results using Panasonic's Intelligent Auto mode. There's very little to dislike about the LX7, with my main issues being redeye, slow buffer flush times when shooting RAW images, and vertical lines in panoramas. Aside from that, the LX7 is a first-rate camera that I can highly recommend.
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Joined Jan 2008
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#63
Quote from thenewguy07 View Post :
Debating between this and the Canon G15. Anyone care to chime in on one over the other?
The annoying fact you have to remove the lens cap on the Lx7. Can be remedied with an auto lens cap. The sensors are small on both. Both have hot shoes. But Panasonic flashes look huge. I had a G11 and used a 270EX as a bounce flash. It worked well. It appears the 270EX to be much smaller than the Panny options. With direct flash, pics will look like any old point and shoot. That's why I dislike my S100. If it had a hot shoe, I'd love it.

And obligatory "my 6D destroys this camera, it sucks!" comment. I hate when people compare totally different classes like comparing a Corvette and a Cobalt.
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#64
I think Panasonic makes the best little cameras, with Canon being #2. I bought a LX2 in 2006 - it's still giving me all I need from a camera. These Lxs have great color.
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#65
Looked at the dimensions of the lx7, and it's way too big--even larger than the rx100! Not really sure I'd consider this thing to be pocketable (jeans)
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#66
Quote from mugupo View Post :
the battery life on the s100 is terrible, you need spare, lx has better battery, zoom longer and f.18 a bit more bokeh, also faster focus speed, but image and video on the s100 is better.
Thanks for the input, i just got an email saying my S100 will be here Tues. i still have my battery from my S95 plus a new spare i never got to use.

this is how my S95 came back to me, i am buying the squaretrade warranty on this one plus the stupid lens error they all get
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#67
Quote from batotman View Post :
The annoying fact you have to remove the lens cap on the Lx7. Can be remedied with an auto lens cap. The sensors are small on both. Both have hot shoes. But Panasonic flashes look huge. I had a G11 and used a 270EX as a bounce flash. It worked well. It appears the 270EX to be much smaller than the Panny options. With direct flash, pics will look like any old point and shoot. That's why I dislike my S100. If it had a hot shoe, I'd love it.

And obligatory "my 6D destroys this camera, it sucks!" comment. I hate when people compare totally different classes like comparing a Corvette and a Cobalt.
Those auto-caps do make it thicker though, so it's no perfect solution.

An s100 with a hotshoe would be silly. It would absolutely make the camera thicker, which would be unacceptable. One of the best aspects of the s100 is how small/slim it is. I have absolutely no problems fitting it in my jeans. Rx100 is a bit bulkier... and the LX7 is a monster by comparison
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Joined Sep 2008
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#68
Quote from iamheretowinp View Post :
Thanks for the input, i just got an email saying my S100 will be here Tues. i still have my battery from my S95 plus a new spare i never got to use.

this is how my S95 came back to me, i am buying the squaretrade warranty on this one plus the stupid lens error they all get
Squaretrade warranty is unnecessary--the lens error on the s95-s100 are considered known defects, and canon repairs them outside of warranty for free.

Sorry to inform you of this, but the S95 and s100 use different batteries. Your s95 battery is of no use now.


I'm assuming your camera was showing some extreme distortion there--otherwise, your s95 body was warped somehow?
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#69
Can you attach other lenses to this and how much do they cost? What are the advantages?
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#70
Quote from guyrelax View Post :
Can you attach other lenses to this and how much do they cost? What are the advantages?
This is a fixed-lens P&S camera. Google the model for reviews.
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#71
i have a trip to disney coming up and have been looking for a camera of some sort to do video clips and pictures along the way. id prefer something pocketable. Ive had other panasonic cameras and have been very happy. I have until april to decide. Would this solve my shopping problem now. Thanks for any input.
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#72
Quote from mugupo View Post :
LX7 can't adjust while recording video, get the rx100 if you serious video and want compact. you can adjust all the setting with the full manual control work while recording video, VQ not to mention is also better, the IS on sony in second to none. Don't take my word from it many other who is doing video work for living would tell you samething bout rx100.
My question was about 120 FPS settings. The RX100 does not do 120 FPS, so that camera is already out of the question. If I wanted to film in just 60 FPS with adjustable settings, I would just use my DSLR.
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#73
Quote from Psygnius View Post :
My question was about 120 FPS settings. The RX100 does not do 120 FPS, so that camera is already out of the question. If I wanted to film in just 60 FPS with adjustable settings, I would just use my DSLR.
A DSLR won't fit in your pants pocket. An RX100 will.

If I'm buying a camera, video capability is the least of my concerns.
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#74
Quote from newman1313 View Post :
i have a trip to disney coming up and have been looking for a camera of some sort to do video clips and pictures along the way. id prefer something pocketable. Ive had other panasonic cameras and have been very happy. I have until april to decide. Would this solve my shopping problem now. Thanks for any input.
THe LX7 is not a tiny P&S camera. If pocket portability is your primary concern, look at the S100 instead--it was on sale the other day for $250. It is much, much smaller than the LX7--same sensor size, but slower lens.
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#75
have had this camera for quite a while now.. its taken spills and drops, gotten rained on and been to a few different countries.. I have a DSLR but this is my every day every where camera.. great little point and shooter..
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