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Wagner ThermoQuiet Brake Pads: Up to $30 Rebate with Purchase of Front/Back Brake Sets: Semi Metallic Disc Brake Pad Set

PhxSunsFan 121 February 28, 2013 at 05:44 PM in Mail In Rebate (6) More Amazon Deals
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Promoted 03-02-2013 at 08:48 AM View Original Post
Amazon is offering Up to $30 Back Rebate on Wagner ThermoQuiet Brake Pads or Up to $50 Rebate with Installation. Click here for qualifying products for your vehicle. Free shipping with Prime (free student accounts available) or if you spend $25 or more. Use slick fillers to find other eligible items to help reach the $25 requirement. Thanks PhxSunsFan
  • Get $15 back via mail-in rebate when you purchase a front brake set.
  • Get $15 back via mail-in rebate when you purchase a back brake set.
  • Get $30 back via mail-in rebate when you purchase both a front and back set brake set.
  • Get $50 back via mail-in rebate when you purchase both a front and back set brake set and get them installed professionally.

Original Post

Edited March 1, 2013 at 04:12 PM by BostonGirl
Check out the Wagner brake rebate I just found at Amazon.....

http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature....B001O0U1OU

Use their part finder to find the right stuff for your ride...
http://www.amazon.com/gp/part-fin...B001O0U1OU

235 Comments

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#196
http://www.procutusa.com/supplier_gm.aspx

Quote :

Rotor refacing during normal pad replacement is not necessary.

Rotor refacing for cosmetic corrosion is unnecessary. Clean up of braking surfaces can be accomplished by 10-15 moderate stops from 62-75 km/h (35-40 mph) with cooling time between stops.

Rotor service is ineffective in correcting brake squeal and/or premature lining wear out and should not be used to address these conditions unless specifically directed by a service bulletin.

When installing new rotors, DO NOT reface them. If a new rotor has more than 0.080 mm (0.003 in) lateral runout when properly mounted on the hub, it may be machined using an approved on-car lathe. Ensure bearing flanges and rotor mounting surfaces are free of corrosion when installing rotors to prevent inducing lateral runout. Use Kent Moore tool J-42450A to clean the corrosion around the wheel studs.
It seems GM doesn't (or didn't) think you need to resurface rotors when changing brake pads. Comments?
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#197
Quote from decolores9 View Post :
I assume you mean the front pads? I did look through the procedure, didn't see anything unusual or unexpected, seems to be pretty straightforward.

Very likely, vibration can be caused by improperly tightened lug nuts. If you have a torque wrench, try loosening and retightening the lug nuts, one at a time, in a cross pattern. As long as you do one nut at a time, you can do this with the car on the ground. The manual shows 80 ft-lbs as the torque spec, but it's always a good idea to confirm with the owners manual. I'd loosen them, tighten to 50 ft-lbs, drive the car back and forth a few times (at least one wheel revolution in each direction), then tighten to 80 ft-lbs in a cross pattern (i.e. given five lug nuts numbered in a clockwise order 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, tighten 1, then 4, then 2, then 5, then 3).

Hopefully that will fix your vibration problem and you won't need to do the full brake job yet.
Thanks for the info. I actually just looked in the owner's manual for lug nuts torque spec, it lists 94 lbs. I'm actually looking forward to doing this, just got all the tools, awaiting the pads and rotors delivery.
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#198
Quote from AlexD7969 View Post :
http://www.procutusa.com/supplier_gm.aspx



It seems GM doesn't (or didn't) think you need to resurface rotors when changing brake pads. Comments?
They actually do if you look at a recent actual GM service manual. If the rotor has a certain roughness(measure of the difference between low and high points on the rotor surface) they specify to resurface. Of course, this "roughness" is so tiny that it almost dictates to resurface every time anyway.
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#199
Quote from decolores9 View Post :



OK, if you consider 40 years of experience and seven years of posts on this forum to be "sudden", you are entitled to your opinion.
7 years of posts on SD doesn't make you a mechanic. Different story if you spent 7 years writing technical diy at e90post for example

People that actually work on their own car knows not to go near the stealerships for services because they require/recommend necessary parts/services so that can charge arm/leg to steal more money from you. Same as dishonest mechanics who tells you to replace or resurface rotors when its not a necessity. That way they can make customers spend more money while they are in for service.

I hope people take this as two different opinions and read/read/read. Sign up/join your corresponding car forum and follow their guides, not SD guides. But ultimately, it's your money, save or spend it how ever you like. Mechanics love ignorant customers laugh out loud
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#200
Quote :

You are entitled to your opinion, but I can't imagine anyone, DIY or mechanic, who actually works on cars would ever tell anyone not to go to a dealership. Many times the dealership is the best or only option, and it certainly is best to go to the dealership for warranty repairs. There may be "bad" dealerships out there, but most dealerships don't recommend unnecessary repairs to charge more and they certainly don't "steal money". Dealerships are often competitive on oil changes, for example, and you get the benefit of factory trained technicians with more skill and experience on your particular type of car.


As someone who worked at a very large dealership(biggest in a pretty large city) you could not be more wrong. Don't get me wrong there are honest people out there that will treat you and your vehicle with respect, but those are few and far between.
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#201
Quote from decolores9 View Post :
No, the 40 years of training and experience makes me a mechanic, not the posting to SD. Just like your posts suggest that you've never worked on a car.
lol I'm probably as good if not more thorough working on a car then you

Quote from decolores9 View Post :
I'm sure yours does.
don't have one, don't need one, especially someone like you who would force customers to perform unnecessary repairs.
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#202
I didn't resurface my rotors on the last pad change. Why hasn't my car blown up yet?

There are bigger issues than rotor resurfacing, like pads that stick. Man, that wore out my pads unevenly.
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#203
Quote from Isis888 View Post :
As someone who worked at a very large dealership(biggest in a pretty large city) you could not be more wrong. Don't get me wrong there are honest people out there that will treat you and your vehicle with respect, but those are few and far between.
Feels that stealership is like dentist, you go in, suffer a bit, then got told bigger problem...
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#204
Quote from decolores9 View Post :
Not sure what you mean by "sticking", but the most common causes of excessive pad wear and uneven pad wear are failure to resurface the rotors to restore the crosshatching when the pads were installed and binding or sticking calipers.
Come on man, no crosshatch causing uneven pad wear? To the point you site that as the major and most common cause of uneven pad wear? What kind of cars to you work on? A warped or tapered rotor can cause uneven wear but that problem is a warped or tapered rotor, that is not the same thing as having a crosshatch. If your old worn out brakes you just removed were even then your rotor is not warped or tapered or at least to the point that it did anything to your existing pads, if your existing pads wore fine, so will the new ones. Your new brakes are not going to suddenly wear unevenly because you did not put a crosshatch on your rotors.

Bottom line..
Evenly worn pads and you not noticing any pulsating when you apply the brakes are a damn good indicator that your brake system is working perfectly and as it should. Do your pad replacement, associated brake hardware replacement and inspect lube everything required and 99 out of 100 times, everything will be just the same as it was prior to you changing your pads except you have new pads now. If it was pulsing before it will still pules after new pads, if it was not pulsing, it won't pulsate after. This is what most DIYers experience in the real world, TSB, factory recommendations, tech notes, bulletins, or not. I personally swap pads on average 2-4 times before getting new rotors (depends on the car) and everything has been perfectly fine. My Chrysler mini van being the exception, the brakes were undersized (based on the number of complaints from countless other owners always going thorough brakes on them) and I was buying new rotors and pads about every 10-20K miles depending on the type of pads and quality of rotors I bought. On the flip side, I have a fox body Mustang that went 160K miles and I have no idea how many times I swapped the pads over the years before finally buying new rotors and only because they were cheap and I had to do bearings and steering components and everything was already apart so why not? I still have the original drums on it
Last edited by nolife March 17, 2013 at 09:11 PM
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#205
You are talking in cicles here..

You say
Quote :
A tapered rotor will cause pads to wear more at the top than the bottom, or vise versa, rather than tapered front to back.
Okay, so a tapered rotor will cause the pad to wear unevenly.. I understand

I said if your old pads showed no signs of uneven wear, you can assume everything is working as it should.

Then you say
Quote :
Not really - you could have a frozen caliper pin, tapered rotor, or any of a host of other problems that do not produce "noticeable" symptoms.
WTF? Which one is it? Will you have uneven wear or not? In your mind, that uneven wear and preexisting problem will only show up after you put new pads on? How were the old existing pads not wearing unevenly but the new ones suddenly will? A rotor problem will only show itself after you switch pads?

Quote :
DIYers often take shortcuts and don't do a correct job. Most probably get away with it, but unfortunately, some of those DIYers end up in the news - they have an auto accident when their brakes fail, they kill someone and are charged with negligent homicide as a result of the improper brake job, etc.
OMG think of the children!!! Pure FUD. Not having a crosshatch pattern on your rotors after swapping pads has caused ZERO accidents. Find me one time there was an accident because someone did not have a crosshatch pattern on their rotors. State poilce confirmed the cause of this accident was Mr Smith did a pad swap last week and although he did inspect everything and the brakes were operating properly, he failed to a restore a crosshatch pattern on his rotors, he rear ended the school bus and killed 42 children.

Quote :
As I said, the two most common causes of uneven pad wear are improper pad replacement and caliper issues.
I see what you did there, you throw in an "As I said" and then say something different this time hoping no one would notice. Your exact statement was

Quote :
the most common causes of excessive pad wear and uneven pad wear are failure to resurface the rotors to restore the crosshatching when the pads were installed and binding or sticking calipers.
That is a very specific statement, no interpetation is there. You said the most common cause of uneven pad wear is not having a crosshatch pattern on your rotors. You didnt say a tapered rotor, an uneven rotor, a grooved rotor, you took it to another level and said it must be none of those and crosshatched as well. The DIYer can feel and see the rotor and can inspect the pad wear pattern to see when a rotor is tapered, grooved, or "warped" even just a couple of thousands but in your mind, that is not good enough, it must also have a crosshatch as well. You then claim anything other than that will cause an accident implying a rotor without a crosshatch will increase stopping distances and you will end up killing someone. I said this before, tire to road friction is far more more limiting than pad to rotor fritction for stopping on a street car. It takes a REALLY noticable and obvious major problem with your brakes to make the pad to rotor friction the limiting factor. Who had ever been told by a machanic that oh, the most common problem has turned up. Your pads the left front are wearing uneven, it must be because 25K miles ago when you put these pads on you did not have a proper cross hatching on your rotor. You must have have had the right rotor turned because those pads are wearing evenly.

Enlighten me with something other than dancing around the specific questions and restating the same vague things over and over.
Last edited by nolife March 18, 2013 at 12:39 PM
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#206
So...if you can't afford to spend the $20 to get your rotors resurfaced then so be it. I agree that its not going to be causing any accidents if you don't and your brakes MAY work fine. To me, its just cheap insurance to do the job right and not having to go back in and repeating the job.

Also, make sure you also buy a hardware kit when you buy your brake pads.
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#207
Quote from decolores9 View Post :
Yes, as I said, the absence of uneven wear does not mean everything is fine, as you claim. It appears you misread my post.



Please cite a source for that claim. I have personally repaired cars after accidents caused by this error - so you claim of "zero accidents" is clearly not accurate, in addition to unfounded.



No, I restated what I said, you just misread it and misunderstood it. You are entitled to your opinions, but your opinions and misquoting of what I posted do not change my statements or the facts.

I'm not sure how to help you further if you aren't reading my posts accurately. In any event, we are off-topic for this thread, so if you wish to continue to the discussion, please start a thread in an appropriate forum.
My quote of your statements was an exact cut and paste of your statements, I did not misread or misunderstand anything at all. Are you really not able to scroll up and see what you typed?

Not having a cross hatch pattern should not suddenly reduce the friction of the pad and rotor enough to cause that to be a limit with stopping. If that was the case, the brakes on that car are borderline and inadequate for such a small thing to cause them to be the new braking limit. You keep side stepping that argument. Don't you think state inspections would require checking for this pattern and there would be tech bulletins and warnings all over brake pads, the NTSB, DOT etc warning people that they are at risk without a cross hatch pattern when they switch pads. All we have from you is a TSB that says to turn the rotors while on the car to get the best possible runout and to account for the rotor in its as installed position to maintain the best customer relationship and experience when replacing brakes on cars that are prone to pulsing. There are people on here that have been changing brakes and working on cars just as much as you have and are not seeing the pad/rotor friction surface being the limiting factor with their stopping even under adverse conditions like mud and dirt caked on the rotors from off roading, uneven pads and pulsing rotors. If you want to spread some of your experience to those of us that are inexperienced, show us something other then your typing. I mean you do throw out some links and references to some things but for some reason you resort to asking the other person to prove you wrong and find other links and proof themselves for other things. So you want to go out of your way and help everyone but then claim you don't want to help and that's not what you are here for with a take it or leave it statement? You don't see yourself doing that? When challenged or asked to explain the concepts or the theory behind things, you fold and resort to responding with FUD like accident risk, claiming things like "if you are too cheap to do it that's your decision" and "you are an inexperienced DIY unlike me", prove me wrong (on a claim you made with no proof), do it your way amateur, etc (these are not your quotes, just similar examples you used in this thread so far). Someone coming into a thread, posting something controversial or not well known or understood by others and responding like that over and over and over again is not trying to help anyone at all, that is trolling, boredom, or just being a male donkey.

Interesting rhetorical technique you have though. You really like fallacies, specially "proof by verbosity" but there are others thrown in there too.

I have no doubt you heard, witnessed and/or personally analyzed quite a few accidents proven to be solely caused by rotors without a cross hatch on them. I would expect nothing else.
I'd love to hear your take on DIY tire plugs vs a tire patch, if you ever get involved in a thread here on SD about that send me a PM Smilie
Last edited by nolife March 19, 2013 at 08:37 PM
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#208
Quote from nolife View Post :
You said the most common cause of uneven pad wear is not having a crosshatch pattern on your rotors. You didnt say a tapered rotor, an uneven rotor, a grooved rotor, you took it to another level and said it must be none of those and crosshatched as well.
The guy never mentions (if ever aware of) that little inconvenient fact that his all-decorated 'crosshatching' will be gone off a rotor in a couple of days and polished to mirror in a week. That is, 99.999% of all rotors out on the road there have no trace of the all-important crosshatching! Gee, I should never, ever drive... where's my tinfoil hat?

No doubt, our forked tongue champion will easily 'explain' it away just like ANY inconvenient fact (with the help of non-existent, completely bogus TSB numbers Smilie
Last edited by VladC March 19, 2013 at 09:05 PM
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#209
Quote from decolores9 View Post :
Yes, that's correct - they replace them when they wear out. It might be different for some sellers, but that's what the warranty means at Advance and Autozone. I still have an '89 that is on something like it's 11th set of free pads and shoes from AZ.
I work for Advance. Limited lifetime warranty does not mean replace for normal wear and tear.. Brakes are made to wear out. Metal against metal, something has to give. It is against manufacturer's defect only, cracked pad, broken rivet etc. That is why it says Limited..:-)
Consider yourself lucky if you have truly been able to just keep swapping out the pads like that.
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#210
You guys need to get a room and leave this thread.

BACK ON TOPIC NOW...I got an email saying they recieved my rebate...in process now. Seems pretty quick!
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