Search in
MOTHER'S DAY Video Games TV Computers Finance Home Apparel Tech Cameras Autos Health & Beauty Children Entertainment Travel Pets
May The Fourth Be With You See Deals
Frontpage Deal
REI Discounts, Deals and Coupon Codes

REI Stoke 29 Gray Mist Backpack (Medium or Large)

Cookie21 30,277 36,679 April 3, 2013 at 12:16 AM in Other (2) More REI Deals
Deal
Score
+38
29,948 Views
See Deal
$49

Deal Details

Promoted 04-03-2013 at 08:38 AM View Original Post
REI.com has REI Stoke 29 Gray Mist Backpack (Medium or Large) on sale for $48.93. REI Members may save an additional $9.79 on their order with coupon code MEM2013 = $39.14. Select free ship to store to save on shipping, otherwise free shipping on orders $50 or more. Thanks Cookie21

Additionally, REI also has REI Stoke 9 Backpack (Amber or Neptune) on sale for $29.93. REI Members may save an additional $5.99 on their order with coupon code MEM2013 = $23.94 with free ship to store. Thanks mjv5864

Note, more information regarding REI Membership can be found here

Original Post

Edited April 3, 2013 at 10:24 AM by BostonGirl
REI Stoke 29 Pack - 2013 Special Buy [rei.com]

Sculpted foam panel reduces sweaty contact areas with multiple peaks and valleys that release vapor; foam structure allows pack to conform to your back for a stable fit
Adjustable, padded and wrapped with breathable mesh, the perforated foam shoulder straps enhance air circulation
Stabilizer wings connect the shoulder straps to the bottom of the pack to stabilize the load and reduce unwanted bouncing
Hipbelt webbing system cinches with a natural forward pulling motion for quick, precise adjustments
Top-loading main compartment carries the essentials you need for a day on the trail; top lid features a small pocket for often-used gear
Hydration sleeve in the main compartment holds a reservoir (not included) for hands-free drinking on the trail; hydration tube can be routed through either shoulder strap
Front mesh pocket is perfect for quickly stashing a jacket or other items; pocket adjusts to help stabilize and compress the pack's load
Hipbelt zip pockets store those small essentials you want at your finger tips, such as energy gel packs, lip balm and sunscreen
The REI Stoke 29 pack features Quick Clip tool loops that hold an ice axe or trekking poles
Special buy

82 Comments

2 3 4 5 6

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#61
Quote from Lerxst View Post :
Discount works fine. Good deal on a nice day pack. If I needed one I'd get it.

The other thing that's nice is the weight. 1.5 lbs for a internal frame pack. Sure you could go lighter, but not at $40.
It's light because the materials are VERY low quality. The REI Flash and Stoke pack lines are not durable at all. See below for more info.

Quote from arribasn View Post :
meh, I'm not really keen on packs with no zippered external compartments (well looks like lid has a small one and the tiny ones on the belt), even for an internal/frameless style pack. It is a pretty light pack, but without much support for carrying real weight. But a decent deal for what it is value wise.
The support isn't such an issue, as these are small packs. The biggest issue is durability. There's a reason why these cheap REI packs are on sale every year. The belt pockets are nice, actually, just don't put stuff that must remain dry in them.

Quote from danandrews27 View Post :
Are there ever any good deals for bigger (60+ liter) backpacks? I don't seem to ever see any posted on SD.
There are, you just gotta look for them. I got the REI Tech Tour 65L pack last year for $85 after coupon via a SD posting! It did me quite well for a few weeks in Mexico, two weeks in the desert, and for various long holiday car trips since then. Not the lightest, but that's not what I wanted. I have a huge 105L Lowe Alpine pack for anything longer than a couple weeks in the mountains.

Quote from DesertCoyote View Post :
top loading, light weight, no internal frame. Good deal if this meets your criteria.

For many people they want the ease of access of front loading, a few external pockets and more internal structure to help distribute weight of pack.

I have owned a few REI packs of different sizes and found the quality to be excellent, and the pack to be a great value compared to other name brands. I have not seen this pack.
The quality on the Flash and Stoke product lines are not. I have owned both. They are made with very lightweight fabrics, and not reinforced where any of the straps meet fabric - such as the shoulder/waist straps connect, where the handles/loops connect, etc.

They are very, VERY low quality - I've had to return one Flash 30, and one Stoke 29 so far because of straps ripping away from the material - and not from excessive weight, either. I also had another Stoke 29 tear at the top fabric extension that increases pack size, merely when I was holding it to stuff a coat inside!

They also have extremely low quality cinch stays for the bag top. The plastic mechanism + spring break very easily. The REI employees I know say these are their most-returned packs, of any brand. The quality is FAR below REI standards. I would not buy these if I were you.

Quote from jleonard711 View Post :
Looks good, but concerned about zero reviews and also a few things that I noticed in looking at the detailed pics. 1) The chest strap doesn't look very durable. It appears to adjust up & down along a plastic rail and clip into place, and it's probably not going to last long before the plastic snaps and then you're screwed. 2) The lack of rings to attach things to on the outside of the pack. When hiking I like to put a lot of often accessed things such as flashlights, gps, etc, on a carabiner and attach it to a ring on the back of the pack. 3) The straps at the bottom for a tent or sleeping pad look like they're just elastic rather than being adjustable straps. That is bad for two reasons - one, you won't be able to tighten it down to make sure whatever you're carrying in it is nice and secure, and two the elastic will eventually get loose and stretched out after a while.

If those things don't bother you at all then this seems like a great pack at a really good price. But I'm going to pass, even though it is tempting for just a simple weekend camping pack.
You're right on all accounts. This is not a backpacking pack. It's a hang-in-the-closet-to-look-like-you-are-active pack. It's entirely form over function - not durable at all!

Quote from davidrools View Post :
1) The sternum strap rails are quite common and are surprisingly robust. I can't vouch for this particular model but I wouldn't be too concerned. Also, the sternum strap shouldn't be carrying much of a load unless you're wearing the pack in a really weird way.

2) Maybe valid for you. I only go for my flashlight at night. GPS should fit in the hip belt pocket and be easier to access anyway. The big front and side stretchy pockets are good for quick access things like a rain shell.

3) The bottom straps aren't elastic but rigid nylon. They're more intended for things like a shovel, ice axe, or other stick tool. Lashing tents and sleeping pads is becoming less common as both have become lighter and smaller and easier to pack internally. On a pack this small, you'll be carrying a minimalist set of gear. If you've got a big tent, CCF pad, and the like, you'll want a bigger pack with better suspension for that heavier load.

Bottom line: this is a smaller and lighter pack for minimalists and lightweight hikers/campers (or day hikers who pack too much).

Also REI members' warranty would make returning the pack fairly painless if it doesn't meet expectations.
1) I can note this particular pack is not sturdy. I had mine fail in two separate ways, as noted above. Had similar issues with last year's "Flash 30" as well.

2) Except that the side stretchy pockets a) tear really easily (mine did just by holding a Nalgene) and b) are fit to the side of the pack, instead of extending out from it, such that, if you have anything inside the bottom of the pack, you can't stuff anything into the side pockets without them becoming stretched beyond their material's limits.

3) While what you said is potentially true, this pack isn't big enough to carry even a bivy sack inside if you're backpacking for a day. Thus, you'll need to lash something on the outside, almost definitely. And, these straps are NOT reinforced where they attach to the pack's fabric, so pretty much anything you lash on the outside will rip the strap (and fabric) if it snags on a tree limb or rock. Very, very poor quality.

As I said, this isn't a pack anyone would use for critical applications. Minimalists tend to want it to function and light weight. In my multiple experiences with this pack, it likely won't function when you need it.

Quote from hawleyncsu View Post :
Im spending 3 weeks in Europe this summer backpacking around. I was going to rent a backpack, however this is very tempting. Can anyone recommend it for backpacking around europe for a few weeks?
This is not a pack you want to rely on. Get something that's a little heavier, but has better seam reinforcement and padding. As someone else mentioned, you're going to need 60L+ size. Here's one that would work and be convenient (which is key when doing that kind of long-term backpacking but not a terrible amount of hiking):

http://www.rei.com/product/830284...pecial-buy Members coupon brings it down quite a bit, too!

As for other recommendations, Mountain Hardware makes excellent packs that are often on sale (got a nice 39L one in December for $37 via a SD), and Black Diamond, though not cheap, are spectacular technical packs.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#62
Quote from mjv5864 View Post :
Stoke 9 for $30 too:

http://www.rei.com/product/813745...pecial-buy
Holy crap. Thank you. I already have a 40 liter daypack, and wanted a smaller one for local hikes where all I want is my water bladder and a couple of small items, but this 29 liter one was too big. This one is perfect though. And I still have my dividend available to save even more.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#63
Quote from longdong View Post :
They are very, VERY low quality - I've had to return one Flash 30, and one Stoke 29 so far because of straps ripping away from the material - and not from excessive weight, either. I also had another Stoke 29 tear at the top fabric extension that increases pack size, merely when I was holding it to stuff a coat inside!

They also have extremely low quality cinch stays for the bag top. The plastic mechanism + spring break very easily. The REI employees I know say these are their most-returned packs, of any brand. The quality is FAR below REI standards. I would not buy these if I were you.
Could not diagree more. I think what you are confusing is a day pack that REI made light... as it's a day pack and the heavier material they use in their larger packs. I've owed the Flash 50 for a couple of years. It does have lighter material as it's really a smaller pack. I've owed the Flash 22 for a few weeks now. I just took the 22 out to hike a slot canyon this past week. While the material is lighter in weight, it's still durable. About the only thing I don't like about the 22 and I think it would apply to this pack as well is the lack of padding in the should straps. If it had a beefier waist strap it would be less of an issue.

If the pack fails for some reason just take it back to REI for a full refund... no questions asked.

But I will need to confirm, I've never owed a Stoke before.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#64
Quote from tcope View Post :
Could not diagree more. I think what you are confusing is a day pack that REI made light... as it's a day pack and the heavier material they use in their larger packs. I've owed the Flash 50 for a couple of years. It does have lighter material as it's really a smaller pack. I've owed the Flash 22 for a few weeks now. I just took the 22 out to hike a slot canyon this past week. While the material is lighter in weight, it's still durable. About the only thing I don't like about the 22 and I think it would apply to this pack as well is the lack of padding in the should straps. If it had a beefier waist strap it would be less of an issue.

If the pack fails for some reason just take it back to REI for a full refund... no questions asked.

But I will need to confirm, I've never owed a Stoke before.
Did you not see that I have owned three of these packs? Two Stoke 29s and one Flash 30. They have ALL failed due to low quality fabric and lack of reinforcement on stitching, not to mention the other corners cut (that I mentioned). They are not a pack that can be filled. At most, they can hold a water bladder and a few items, but they cannot be packed, and the material rips with just minor scuffs on granite/limestone.

Of course, I did take these defective packs back for refunds/exchange. And, when I did, the REI employees themselves say these packs are their most returned packs due to exactly the quality defects I mentioned.

REI makes some good stuff, but the smaller Flash and Stoke line of packs are not it. I even mentioned I have another REI pack that is awesome... Did you just ignore almost all of what I wrote?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#65
Quote from longdong View Post :
Did you not see that I have owned three of these packs? Two Stoke 29s and one Flash 30. They have ALL failed due to low quality fabric and lack of reinforcement on stitching, not to mention the other corners cut (that I mentioned). They are not a pack that can be filled. At most, they can hold a water bladder and a few items, but they cannot be packed, and the material rips with just minor scuffs on granite/limestone.

Of course, I did take these defective packs back for refunds/exchange. And, when I did, the REI employees themselves say these packs are their most returned packs due to exactly the quality defects I mentioned.

REI makes some good stuff, but the smaller Flash and Stoke line of packs are not it. I even mentioned I have another REI pack that is awesome... Did you just ignore almost all of what I wrote?
going to have to add to the disagreement - i have a flash 18, 30, and 65, and all of them are well made for what they are - LIGHT WEIGHT packs. They purposely give up some durability to get lighter weight- the packs aren't cheaply made, they are purpose-built. I think you missed the point.

If you want a more burly pack, they have lots of other options (that's why REI makes so many different packs- they fill different niches).
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by pso April 3, 2013 at 03:10 PM
#66
Quote from pso View Post :
going to have to add to the disagreement - i have a flash 18, 30, and 65, and all of them are well made for what they are - LIGHT WEIGHT packs. They purposely give up some durability to get lighter weight- the packs aren't cheaply made, they are purpose-built.

If you want a more burly pack, they have lots of other options (that's why REI makes so many different packs- they fill different niches).
Do you carry anything in yours? When I go climbing, I expect a 29/30L pack to carry everything I need. This one can't, at least not for many trips.

Maybe I'm harder on mine that you or most people, but I really don't think so. Yes, I squeeze through tight spots and jog through Ponderosa & Juniper en route, so they get snagged on occasion, but I really don't think that should rip loops or straps off a well-made bag.

My question is, how often do you use yours like I use my packs? I'm doing this 3-5 times a week.

Hell, even the minimalist websites say to avoid the Flash 30 and Stoke 29 because of the chintzy material. Yes, they're light, but that's a curse if you need them to work under duress.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#67
Quote from longdong View Post :
Do you carry anything in yours? When I go climbing, I expect a 29/30L pack to carry everything I need. This one can't, at least not for many trips.

Maybe I'm harder on mine that you or most people, but I really don't think so. Yes, I squeeze through tight spots and jog through Ponderosa & Juniper en route, so they get snagged on occasion, but I really don't think that should rip loops or straps off a well-made bag.

My question is, how often do you use yours like I use my packs? I'm doing this 3-5 times a week.

Hell, even the minimalist websites say to avoid the Flash 30 and Stoke 29 because of the chintzy material. Yes, they're light, but that's a curse if you need them to work under duress.
haha, now I get it. you're using a light weight hiking pack as a climbing pack.

if you want a bullet-proof pack, get one actually made for climbing, like this: http://www.rei.com/product/816105...le-35-pack - you could drag it behind a car all day and it would be fine, but you're going to be carrying 2 more pounds of weight as a penalty.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#68
Quote from longdong View Post :

My question is, how often do you use yours like I use my packs? I'm doing this 3-5 times a week.

Hell, even the minimalist websites say to avoid the Flash 30 and Stoke 29 because of the chintzy material. Yes, they're light, but that's a curse if you need them to work under duress.
I probably use at least one of my packs once a week, for the last, i don't know, 3 years? Definitely not as much as you, and maybe I'm more careful than most people (though I load packs up fully all the time), and maybe several people got defective packs, but mine haven't had a single issue yet.

I'm also toward the ultralight backpacking end of the spectrum, so I'm more careful with my gear than your average person. I really don't think REI should try to sell lighter-weight gear, since most people aren't as hardcore (read: nerdy) about their gear as your average ultralighter. REI should probably do a better job educating people, or just leave lighter gear to cottage manufacturers.

Hammockgear makes a 6.5 ounce full winter hammock tarp out of cuben fiber- it's actually pretty tough for how light it is (about 2.5 pounds lighter than a standard tarp for the size), but if REI sold it, I bet 90% of them would be returned with holes in it, because most people don't appreciate that tradeoff of weight and durability. If you treat something like that well though, it will last for years.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by pso April 3, 2013 at 03:26 PM
#69
Quote from pso View Post :
I probably use at least one of my packs once a week, for the last, i don't know, 3 years? Definitely not as much as you, and maybe I'm more careful than most people (though I load packs up fully all the time), and maybe several people got defective packs, but mine haven't had a single issue yet.

I'm also toward the ultralight backpacking end of the spectrum, so I'm more careful with my gear than your average person. I really don't think REI should try to sell lighter-weight gear, since most people aren't as hardcore (read: nerdy) about their gear as your average ultralighter. REI should probably do a better job educating people, or just leave lighter gear to cottage manufacturers.

Hammockgear makes a 6.5 ounce full winter hammock tarp out of cuben fiber- it's actually pretty tough for how light it is, but if REI sold it, I bet 90% of them would be returned with holes in it, because most people don't appreciate that tradeoff of weight and durability.
This is very true. This pack is similar to REI's Flash 30 and I have read good things about both on several forums. Grabbing one of these for my girlfriend to come along on some overnighters with me. As long as you aren't throwing your bags around this should be a good lightweight bag.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#70
I agree with PSO. I have a Flash 18 and 65 (I'm looking for something in between). I use the flash 18 for day hikes and nice weather overnighters (no tent - very minimal setup). 65L is big for long weekends as I keep lightening and shrinking my load. I wasn't sure how the "stoke" was different from the "flash" line but apparently they're pretty similar - made for lightweight/ultralighters. They will only work well when filled with lightweight gear. Filling them with your rack and ropes will not allow them to hold up for any reasonable amount of time, mr longdong. I don't fault the pack itself, since that's not what it's made for. I do understand the agony of equipment failure in the field, but this should only be a concern when these packs are overpacked with too much weight.

I'm glad that REI offers these flash and stoke packs, though they really should be more up front about their intended use. I like to try a pack on before I buy, and there's no GoLite store near me, so these packs are a good option for me. It's unfortunate that people shopping by price & capacity alone will be poorly served by this line. I'd like for the lightweight packs to stay cheaper because of less materials used and features omitted, but if they keep getting returned, that'll factor into the price.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#71
how does this compare to the rei traverse 30 and ems trail 30 packs?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#72
I bought the smaller version the Stoke 19 a while back. I took it out a couple times, but the back doesn't vent at all. It makes your entire back soaked in sweat. I returned it for a refund.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#73
Quote from pso View Post :
haha, now I get it. you're using a light weight hiking pack as a climbing pack.

if you want a bullet-proof pack, get one actually made for climbing, like this: http://www.rei.com/product/816105/rei-pinnacle-35-pack - you could drag it behind a car all day and it would be fine, but you're going to be carrying 2 more pounds of weight as a penalty.
That's what my MH 39L Trad pack for $37 delivered (via a DoD at REI, posted here in December) is for. http://www.rei.com/product/833651...0-closeout It is LIGHT YEARS better than these REI lightweight packs. Yes, it's heavier, but it's burly. So much more sophisticated, too.

Quote from pso View Post :
I probably use at least one of my packs once a week, for the last, i don't know, 3 years? Definitely not as much as you, and maybe I'm more careful than most people (though I load packs up fully all the time), and maybe several people got defective packs, but mine haven't had a single issue yet.

I'm also toward the ultralight backpacking end of the spectrum, so I'm more careful with my gear than your average person. I really don't think REI should try to sell lighter-weight gear, since most people aren't as hardcore (read: nerdy) about their gear as your average ultralighter. REI should probably do a better job educating people, or just leave lighter gear to cottage manufacturers.

Hammockgear makes a 6.5 ounce full winter hammock tarp out of cuben fiber- it's actually pretty tough for how light it is (about 2.5 pounds lighter than a standard tarp for the size), but if REI sold it, I bet 90% of them would be returned with holes in it, because most people don't appreciate that tradeoff of weight and durability. If you treat something like that well though, it will last for years.
I go a lot of places where there are no trails, so I think you're right - I'm not overly careful with my gear. But, the point is, REI gear has a reputation that you don't HAVE to be careful with their fabric gear. That's the only point I'm trying to make. I generally agree with most of what you said, though.

I expect my pants/shorts/shirts/shoes/packs to all withstand sliding downhill on a scrabbly mess (often with cacti) for a hundred feet or more. I expect them to not tear if they catch on a lip. These packs don't meet those expectations, whereas the larger and cheaper MH pack I mentioned above does, and with aplomb! Sure, it's perhaps not the intended usage for most folks, but REI's fabric rep is durability and utility, and these don't meet that spec. Here in the high mountain desert, that's an absolute necessity.

Quote from davidrools View Post :
I agree with PSO. I have a Flash 18 and 65 (I'm looking for something in between). I use the flash 18 for day hikes and nice weather overnighters (no tent - very minimal setup). 65L is big for long weekends as I keep lightening and shrinking my load. I wasn't sure how the "stoke" was different from the "flash" line but apparently they're pretty similar - made for lightweight/ultralighters. They will only work well when filled with lightweight gear. Filling them with your rack and ropes will not allow them to hold up for any reasonable amount of time, mr longdong. I don't fault the pack itself, since that's not what it's made for. I do understand the agony of equipment failure in the field, but this should only be a concern when these packs are overpacked with too much weight.

I'm glad that REI offers these flash and stoke packs, though they really should be more up front about their intended use. I like to try a pack on before I buy, and there's no GoLite store near me, so these packs are a good option for me. It's unfortunate that people shopping by price & capacity alone will be poorly served by this line. I'd like for the lightweight packs to stay cheaper because of less materials used and features omitted, but if they keep getting returned, that'll factor into the price.
I really don't think I'm overloading these. 25lbs, maybe 30 total for a 29/30L pack isn't that much. But, your point is made and understood. That's why I'm trying to mention it here, because nowhere does it say in the marketing that these are dainty packs that need to be cautiously regarded and lightly used.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by longdong April 3, 2013 at 07:00 PM
#74
I'm just going to pseudo-threadjack this and say that if you're in the market for any sort of bigger pack, this Gregory Baltoro [rei.com] in 65L or 75L is the bee's knees. I have the slightly older Baltoro 70, and let me tell you what ladies and gentlemen...something as mundane as a backpack shouldn't make you slightly excited "down there", but having a wet dream about this pack wouldn't be entirely out of place.

20-30 miles a day with a 55lb pack has never felt like less of a big deal.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#75
Quote from longdong View Post :
That's what my MH 39L Trad pack for $37 delivered (via a DoD at REI, posted here in December) is for. http://www.rei.com/product/833651...0-closeout It is LIGHT YEARS better than these REI lightweight packs. Yes, it's heavier, but it's burly. So much more sophisticated, too.
It's all about priorities. Each person has different priorities, which is totally fine as long as they realize that theirs aren't the only ones. You mention that the MH pack is heavy as a side note. I look at that pack and notice it is literally twice as heavy as the REI 30 liter lightweight packs and run screaming away. Your priorities are to scrabble anywhere to be able to see and experience more in a day, and mine are to be less weighed down, so that I can hike farther and see and experience more in a day. Different priorities, none better than the other as long as they lead us to doing what we enjoy doing.


Quote from longdong View Post :
I go a lot of places where there are no trails, so I think you're right - I'm not overly careful with my gear. But, the point is, REI gear has a reputation that you don't HAVE to be careful with their fabric gear. That's the only point I'm trying to make. I generally agree with most of what you said, though.

I expect my pants/shorts/shirts/shoes/packs to all withstand sliding downhill on a scrabbly mess (often with cacti) for a hundred feet or more. I expect them to not tear if they catch on a lip. These packs don't meet those expectations, whereas the larger and cheaper MH pack I mentioned above does, and with aplomb! Sure, it's perhaps not the intended usage for most folks, but REI's fabric rep is durability and utility, and these don't meet that spec. Here in the high mountain desert, that's an absolute necessity.
I would argue that REI has a reputation that everything is extremely well made, not that it's bullet proof and should allow you to scrabble through cacti (this puts you in the 1% hardest on your gear of all REI customers, easily, btw).

Well-made, heavy REI packs will be bullet proof, yes, but well made lightweight packs shouldn't be expected to be, no matter how well they're made, given current technology. You take 24 ounces of fabric off of a pack, there's no way it's going to be as durable. REI points out that those packs are light weight, with, I think, the implicit understanding that the trade-off is less durability, but, as I said before, I think they could do a better job of making that clear.

REI should do something like what Osprey does- show the optimal load on each of their packs. Look at the osprey hornet 32 specs:

http://www.ospreypacks.com/en/pro...ifications

It shows that the optimal load is right around 20 lbs, 25 max pretty clearly


Quote from longdong View Post :
I really don't think I'm overloading these. 25lbs, maybe 30 total for a 29/30L pack isn't that much. But, your point is made and understood. That's why I'm trying to mention it here, because nowhere does it say in the marketing that these are dainty packs that need to be cautiously regarded and lightly used.
Look again at the Osprey Hornet 32 pack specs- 25-30 lbs isn't just not not much, it's outside of the max load for that pack. The optimal max load is 20 lbs according to the specs.

I usually put 25-30 pounds in my 65 liter lightweight flash pack for a 2-3 day backpacking trip. The same weight for a lightweight pack that's made for half the volume is just too much. Unless of course your pack has an additional 24 ounces of fabric to strengthen everything, like your MH pack. But again, the trade off is weight. 24 ounces here and there quickly adds up, which again is fine if light weight isn't a priority.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by pso April 3, 2013 at 09:41 PM
Page 5 of 6
2 3 4 5 6
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)