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Are mSATA SSD's generally slower than SATA III SSD's?

Pzark41 2,490 1,914 April 5, 2013 at 02:17 PM
Just got a Lenovoy Y580 and wondering if it would be better to just get rid of the HDD and replace it with a standard SSD or keep the HDD and just add a bigger mSATA SSD. I'm leaning towards the latter unless the speed difference would be large. Thanks in advance.

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#2
Quote from Pzark41 View Post :
Just got a Lenovoy Y580 and wondering if it would be better to just get rid of the HDD and replace it with a standard SSD or keep the HDD and just add a bigger mSATA SSD. I'm leaning towards the latter unless the speed difference would be large. Thanks in advance.
Do you think that getting a larger mSATA drive will improve the performance?
It is a caching SSD, isn't it?
I have an Ultrabook that has a 32 gig SSD for caching and a 500 gig spinner, and it's bullet fast and I'm not convinced that swapping the mSATA for a regular SSD with the OS installed on it, would be any faster, or are you suggesting going with the mSATA for caching and having a regular SSD to replace the spinner?
If so, it's bound to be faster, although I can't guess by how much and I suspect that it wouldn't be worth the expense, specially if it's a big expensive SSD.
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#3
mSATA have limited real estate so you do lose some performance. Example is in this Anandtech article. Look at the IOPS.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/680...0gb-review
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#4
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Do you think that getting a larger mSATA drive will improve the performance?
It is a caching SSD, isn't it?
I have an Ultrabook that has a 32 gig SSD for caching and a 500 gig spinner, and it's bullet fast and I'm not convinced that swapping the mSATA for a regular SSD with the OS installed on it, would be any faster, or are you suggesting going with the mSATA for caching and having a regular SSD to replace the spinner?
If so, it's bound to be faster, although I can't guess by how much and I suspect that it wouldn't be worth the expense, specially if it's a big expensive SSD.
How did you ask more questions than me?

If I were to get a larger (ie 256GB) mSATA SSD I wouldn't use it for caching as it is obviously big enough to be used as a standalone SSD. I would just have two separate drives. Same thing goes for if I were to replace the HDD with a standard 2.5 SSD. Either way it's not going to be used for caching.

I just wanted to know in general how much of a performance loss I would see if I went with a larger mSATA SSD as opposed to a larger SATA III SSD.
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#5
Quote from Pzark41 View Post :
How did you ask more questions than me?

If I were to get a larger (ie 256GB) mSATA SSD I wouldn't use it for caching as it is obviously big enough to be used as a standalone SSD. I would just have two separate drives. Same thing goes for if I were to replace the HDD with a standard 2.5 SSD. Either way it's not going to be used for caching.

I just wanted to know in general how much of a performance loss I would see if I went with a larger mSATA SSD as opposed to a larger SATA III SSD.
Well, in theory, the regular SSD is faster than the mSATA but I'm not sure that you'll see real life results, except when benchmarking.
On the other hand, if you're installing the OS and programs on it, that might be a fairly substantial step up.
If you use the mSATA for caching and replace the spinner with an SSD, it should be a fair bit faster, but I'm not 100% sure of that, as this whole mSATA caching thing is pretty new and until I do it myself a few times, I can only guess.
I read a user review (HP Envy4 1130US) recently from a fellow who swapped out the mSATA for an SSD and put the OS on the SSD and he said it was REALLY faster.
That's the extent of my knowledge.
Maybe someone here has some actual hands on experience, and will enlighten us.
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#6
According to Newegg, the speeds on a Crucial M4 256 GB SSD [newegg.com] is the same as its mSATA counterpart [newegg.com]. Next thing to look at would be your SATA ports. Searching around online, it looks like the mSATA port is SATA III (6 Gbit/s), so that's good. I would say to go with the mSATA drive if it's not too expensive and have a large secondary mechanical drive for data storage. The main issue I would see with the 2 drive approach would be increased battery drain.
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#7
Quote from Pzark41 View Post :
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Do you think that getting a larger mSATA drive will improve the performance?
It is a caching SSD, isn't it?
I have an Ultrabook that has a 32 gig SSD for caching and a 500 gig spinner, and it's bullet fast and I'm not convinced that swapping the mSATA for a regular SSD with the OS installed on it, would be any faster, or are you suggesting going with the mSATA for caching and having a regular SSD to replace the spinner?
If so, it's bound to be faster, although I can't guess by how much and I suspect that it wouldn't be worth the expense, specially if it's a big expensive SSD.
How did you ask more questions than me?

If I were to get a larger (ie 256GB) mSATA SSD I wouldn't use it for caching as it is obviously big enough to be used as a standalone SSD. I would just have two separate drives. Same thing goes for if I were to replace the HDD with a standard 2.5 SSD. Either way it's not going to be used for caching.

I just wanted to know in general how much of a performance loss I would see if I went with a larger mSATA SSD as opposed to a larger SATA III SSD.
I don't believe there are any inherent reasons for it to be slower, they are both Sata III in the article there was just an issue with the controller not being optimized for the mSATA connector but they both have the full bandwidth available to them, I would just check the particular model you are interested in to be sure it can achieve full speed.
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