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Rustoleum Cabinet Transformation Kits (White, Expresso, Cabernet Rust) EXPIRED

brisar 108,738 April 18, 2013 at 01:45 AM in Home & Home Improvement More Home Depot Deals
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Promoted 04-18-2013 at 07:05 AM View Original Post
Home Depot.com has Rustoleum Cabinet Transformation Kits on sale listed below for $37.24 (must add to cart for discount). Shipping is free. Thanks brisarAdditionally, Home Depot.com also has 9-Piece Linzer Best Professional Paint Tray Set on sale for $8.48 (must add to cart for discount). Shipping is free. Thanks brisar [Discuss]

Original Post

Edited April 18, 2013 at 01:53 AM by brisar
Home Depot. [homedepot.com]

*Must add to cart to see this price*

Rustoleum Cabinet Transformation Kits
$74.48 $37.24 today

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Community Wiki

Last Edited by knicksfan April 20, 2013 at 10:49 AM
*Espresso [homedepot.com]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feat...j_1I#t=20s

I've been getting lots of questions so I figured I'd post the steps I followed in this Wiki. This is a work in progress, I'll try to complete my writing over the weekend.

Here are the materials I needed / used:
- Rustoleum kit, obviously
- 4 nylon paintbrushes (I used shur-line, which are fairly high quality)
- DeWalt eye protectors Dewalt DPG54 [amazon.com]
- Foam brushes [amazon.com]
- Lint free cloths [amazon.com], your choice, but these worked out well for me.
- Wagner sprayer [amazon.com]
- Wood Putty [amazon.com], to fill any hair-line cracks on the cabinets
- fine grain sanding paper (to sand the putty)
- Painters tape and some newspaper
- Couple of 2 x 4's (I really used 2 x 3's, they were cheaper) and I went with 8 foot long, just so I could get them home in small suv, along with
- some finishing nails
- Painter's mask, just something that can limit particle intake
- Box of disposable gloves
- Some disposable quart-sized containers (like fast food soup containers). I got these cheap at the dollar store.
- hammer, screw drivers
- box of sandwich bags
- 1 gallon zip lock bag
- marker

Step 1: Degrease, Degrease, Degrease. My wife did most of this, degreasing during the week so by the time I got started on Friday afternoon, this was completely done. She claims to have degreased twice but she's a cleaning maniac. (Love you honey! :-) ) I suspect there's at least a 3rd one in there.

Step 2: Identify any hair line fractures & apply putty to fill them. This is cosmetic but will also prevent some of the coatings from accumulating in those cracks then dripping down when you're not looking. Once dry, you'll need to sand down any excess. Up to you whether you want to remove the doors to complete this step (I did).

Step 3: Create diagram of your cabinets, then label each door/drawer/section on the drawing.

Step 4: Using small pieces of painters tape & a marker, create numbered labels for each of the doors & drawers that correspond to your drawing. Place those labels on each door/drawer/section. This comes in handy for the next step & to place everything back where it belongs.

Step 5: Lay out a pair of 2 x 4's (I used 2 x 3's, which are cheaper) flat & hammer some finishing nails, equally spaced, around 6 - 8 inches apart. The idea is that you'll rest all of the cabinet doors on these nails, allowing you to paint the back side, flipping them over so that only the top of the finishing nails are touching, then painting the front & allowing both sides to dry. Otherwise, if you lay the doors on a flat surface, you'd have to paint one side & wait for it to dry completely before painting the other side.

Step 6: Remove all cabinet doors & cabinet hardware. As you remove the hardware from each door (hinges, screws, etc.), put them in a sandwich bag & label these with painters tape too. Meaning, all hinges & screws from door 1 should go in a sandwich bag labeled #1, all hinges & screws from door #2 in bag #2, etc. Place however many doors fit on top of the 2 x 4's & set the others aside if you don't have a large enough setup to lay them all out.

Step 6a: Tape and/or newspaper any of the doors that have glass partitions, to protect the glass. Personally, I used a brush on the glass doors because it seemed wasteful to spray the 2 inch edge.

Step 7: Remove all drawers (I did not empty the drawers, just threw some stuff out that needed throwing out). I stacked the drawers on my dining room table in a sort of inter-locking format (2 stacks), that allowed me to still get to each drawer's face for prep/painting right in place. Remove all drawer knobs/screws & place in bag.

Step 8: Apply painters tape near the walls that are flush with the cabinets. I also put painters tape on the edge of each shelf to avoid painting the edges while I painted the cabinets. Basically, anyplace the brush will go, you'll want to protect yourself from mistakes by applying tape where your brush strokes could go astray.

Step 9: Prepare the area where you plan to paint the cabinet doors with the sprayer. I put the 2 x 4's on a 10 foot fold-out picnic table, put a tarp on the table, below the 2 x 4's and some additional tarp on the floors. You'll also want some tarp (I used lightweight plastic/cheap ones) on the walls near where I was spraying. You won't see any splatter but there is a fine mist that is easy to clean/remove that travels all over the place. If you want to minimize cleaning...tape the plastic tarp to all nearby walls/appliances, etc.

Step 10: Pour one-third of the bond coat in either of the containers that come with the sprayer (no need to thin it out, use as-is). I used the metal container since it was easier to hold/maneuver. Set the sprayer to the lowest setting, put on the goggles, mask & disposable gloves.

Step 11: Find one of the doors that has the least amount of visibility (I chose the one in the pantry versus main kitchen cabinet) and make sure you start on the back, to get some practice. Actually, what you should do is break out some newspaper & spray that first to get a feel for the machine. It has 3 settings, vertical spray, horizontal & something I'll call spot spray. The quick-guide is easy to follow on this. Your first pass with the sprayer will look like splatter & leave lots of unpainted surface. As you come back around, it will do a complete cover (plus remember you'll need to do a 2nd coat anyway). Don't flex your wrist from side to side, move with the sprayer, keeping your wrist/hands relatively straight & steady. The guide will advise you on this as well.

Step 12: Using a 2 inch brush, pour some of the bond coat in one of the disposable containers & start painting the cabinets & drawers (my wife was doing this while I sprayed the doors). I was frugal with the brush since a little seemed to go a long way & because everything will require a 2nd coat, I also didn't want any bleeding/dripping.

Step 13: Grab a bite, beer/wine & wait 2-3 hours for the 1st bond coat to dry.

Step 14: Repeat Steps 11 & 12 all over again, cover any of the small spots from the finishing nails, etc. Just a quick note; I had some silicone/caulk and/or similar type of material that covered some of the gaps on my cabinets. You may need to hit those spots 4 - 5 times to get it to bond fully, but it will eventually cover & stick.

Step 14a: Put containers with wet brush inside a plastic bag & tie it. I used those produce bags you get at the store, to keep it moist. Sleep.
Step 14b: Inspect during the day for any missed spots & dab those.

Step 15: Glaze. This is optional & there are various techniques you can use (see YouTube Rustoleum videos). My wife just wanted the darker finish that the glaze provides so it was simply a matter of applying the glaze with a 2 inch brush, letting it sit for a little, then wiping it (wipe with the grain) with the rags provided in the kit . I started with the cabinets themselves, by sections. Don't try & do the entire cabinets before starting to wipe, the first ones will dry out by the time you get back to them. Some people elect to do the front of the cabinet doors only but there was more than enough to cover both sides. Don't be too frugal with brush here but don't let it accumulate too much in the seams either. You just want to make sure you get uniform coverage for an even/consistent look. Allow it to dry for 8 hours, yes, seriously, 8 hours. Use the 2 x 4's again to glaze the back of the doors first, then flip over, rest on the nails to do the front.

Step 16: Top coat. I used nylon brushes here cause I forgot about the advice I read about using a foam brush instead. I've seen postings where some applied with a nylon brush, then removed excess with a foam brush while others simply applied it with a foam brush entirely. The top coat does have a tendency to accumulate & if it dries, it dries white so don't let it happen. Again, start with an inconspicuous area (back of a door) to get a feel for amount to use, brush strokes etc. I had some small areas where it dried white, to which I simply re-applied a little bit of bond coat with a foam brush. Allow it to dry overnight.

Step 17:

OK, gotta stop here, will complete this over the weekend.

85 Comments

1 2 3 4 5

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#4
Thanks so much, we were going to redo our cabinets this weekend. You just cut my cost in half! Thanks again!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#5
These suck take it from me I have 29 rentals and paint all the time use nuvo and it will not scratch off

http://www.nuvocabinetpaint.com/
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#6
Quote from DealGypsy View Post :
These suck take it from me I have 29 rentals and paint all the time use nuvo and it will not scratch off

http://www.nuvocabinetpaint.com/
Why do these kits suck? Im thinking of getting white.

Why is nuvo better?

Any advice would be apprecited!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#7
Looking for more info on that Nuvo stuff too. I ordered one of these kits, wondering if Nuvo is worth double the price.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#8
Quote from DealGypsy View Post :
These suck take it from me I have 29 rentals and paint all the time use nuvo and it will not scratch off

http://www.nuvocabinetpaint.com/
Could you provide more info about the Nuvo paint? I've been looking into redoing my cabinets this summer (since I can't afford to replace them) and I want to make sure I get the best stuff for my money.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#9
repped!!

should be front page!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#10
Quote from danforth2 View Post :
Why do these kits suck? Im thinking of getting white.

Why is nuvo better?

Any advice would be apprecited!
Nuvo uses no top coat, it built in the other kit uses a top coat which will scratch off, I have done a dozen of remodels with both and I will only use the nuvo, it thicker and gives you a smooth finish.
Quote from dabuddha View Post :
Could you provide more info about the Nuvo paint? I've been looking into redoing my cabinets this summer (since I can't afford to replace them) and I want to make sure I get the best stuff for my money.
I prefer it as it all in one, I have never used a better product. I also use their gianni countertop paint which is amazing also, spent the extra and go nuvo.
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#11
Looking at the nuvo product and cost it's $5 cheaper than the normal price of rustoleum's product.

It has a lot more finishing colors too.

I think we may be investing in the nuvo kit and a separate can to help cover the additional sq ft in our kitchen cabinets.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#12
Quote from DealGypsy View Post :
Nuvo uses no top coat, it built in the other kit uses a top coat which will scratch off, I have done a dozen of remodels with both and I will only use the nuvo, it thicker and gives you a smooth finish.

I prefer it as it all in one, I have never used a better product. I also use their gianni countertop paint which is amazing also, spent the extra and go nuvo.

Thanks for the quick response. Will try out this nuvo kit. Have a great day!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#13
I can agree, We re-did our entire kitchen (took 5 days for one person between coats to get it done). We went white. It's been a year and there are several scratched areas and the topcoat has began to yellow noticeably. With less than a year before we place it on the housing market, I have a bit of work to be done to touch it up without it being noticeable.
Quote from danforth2 View Post :
Why do these kits suck? Im thinking of getting white.

Why is nuvo better?

Any advice would be apprecited!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#14
Will Home Depot refund the difference for those who purchased a week or so ago?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#15
Does anyone know how many cabinets this will do? The site says 100 sq ft - is that stretching it?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
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