Search in
Video Games TV Computers Finance Home Apparel Tech Cameras Autos Health & Beauty Children Entertainment Travel Pets
Forum Thread
Sears Discounts, Deals and Coupon Codes

Kenmore Elite Hybrid Water Softener - $525 AC

jkistheman 1,087 2,536 July 12, 2013 at 06:54 AM in Home & Home Improvement (2) More Sears Deals
Deal
Score
+7
36,024 Views
Get Deal

Thread Details

Last Edited by jkistheman July 12, 2013 at 08:07 AM
Kenmore Elite Hybrid Water Softener [sears.com] - $525

I have been watching the prices on the Elite model which varied between $639-$799. It dropped to $525 AC today and my shopyourway had a 20% back in points over $100 in addition to any CB options you may discover.

Thx to RocketScience89
Add code : SEARS35OFF300AFFILIATEDEALS
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.

48 Comments

1 2 3 4

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#31
Quote from cusco View Post :
in our house we have a softrain one as well.. but it's always recharging nonstop. don't know why. it was left behind by the original owner. so debating if we should just replace it with this kenmore since it has a whole house filter.
Sounds like the valve needs service or is defective.
A neighbor had that happen and his water/sewer bill was over $300 while mine was around $40.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#32
Quote from Stevied916 View Post :
You would be better off with a Fleck like this one:

http://www.qualitywatertreatment....SXT.htm#32
Agreed. I researched for about 2-3months looking for a softener to install myself in my new construction home. I ended up with this one:

http://www.qualitywatertreatment....osoft.html

Read their site, and look at how to size. Also their online chat and telephone support is TOP NOTCH pre AND post purchase.
Quote from JoJoDaClown View Post :
Agree completely. That system will last much longer than the Kenmore Elite. It's nearly identical to my setup.
Agreed.
Quote from G2gGolfing69 View Post :
I bought this system last Dec as I needed one ASAP and was on a budget. Works great as a softener and got rid of the sulfur smell from my water.

The Fleck above doesn't have a whole home filter with it which was the other main selling point to this.
With any of the Fleck units, you can have a KDF media filter. It's minimal cost, lasts ~7years, and prolongs the life of your resin if you have high chlorine.
Quote from 9ninsix View Post :
I've been looking to purchase a water softener. Was going to jump on this until all the recommendations for the Fleck system above. Can someone go over why the other system is superior to the Kenmore OP listed?
The all in one cabinet units are prone to leaks and not as efficient as seperately tanked units.

When you buy a water softener, with salt based regeneration, you are paying for the valve and the resin mainly. Everything else it freely available for companies to re-sell and package as units. The top two companies that manufacture metered valve heads are Fleck and Clack. Clack has cracked down on internet sales, and usually you will only find them through dealers now.

Fleck is a respected brand, and makes some of the best metered valve heads. It is necessary to properly size your unit based on hardness of your water (which can be found via online water report for most counties with municipal water, or take a sample to a pool store), the number of people in the house, any additional water use, and regeneration.

The capacities listed, are based on how many grains the unit can soften before it needs to be regenerated (flushed with salt brine). Keep in mind, more is not necessarily better. , if you are running a metered unit and it does not regenerate often enough you can run into bridging or the brine tank, and it is not recommended. Ideally, you want to be able to use your capacity and regenerate within 14 day cycles.

I wanted the most efficient, and longest lasting unit I could find for the best value. An electronic metered unit is the best for this. It offers precise measurement, and only regenerates when needed. I also chose to go with the upgraded resin, and upgraded Fleck 6700XTR unit for less water and salt usage. The unit I chose also provides a lifetime warranty, and KDF media filter.

I was surprised to find, based on my usage, and the consumption at my house (3 people, 2400 sq ft, water saving fixtures), I only needed a 24,000 grain softener.

Quote from sdaddicted View Post :
I am ready to buy a water softener this week and would like to know what makes these systems so superior to the other type. I watched a couple of videos on how each of them function and basically need to know the brass tacks. Are they cheaper to maintain? Better filtration/performance? Lower power consumption? More reliable? Are they even in the same league price-wise as far as keeping them supplied? I had never even heard of this Fleck system until I came upon this thread and now you have my curiosity piqued. Any help you could give me (or even a comparison link or two) would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
They are higher quality, more efficient, better performance. See above for more comments.

Also, a few other thoughts. After looking close to the spec on the Kenmore, I notice that the flow rate and amount of resin are rather low for the stated softening capacity. These are things to look out for, and noticeable differences between an industry standard unit such as a Fleck.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by ngsm13 July 15, 2013 at 06:37 AM
#33
This system is a 31000 grain system.
You can go to this website to calculate what grain size you require [qualitywatertreatment.com]

The only information you'll require, is to know what hardness (grains per gallon "GPG") your water is. If you live in an area with city provided water, you can generally get this information with a simple google search of "city state water hardness grains per gallon", where you obviously put in your city and state into that search text.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#34
Quote from ngsm13 View Post :
Agreed. I researched for about 2-3months looking for a softener to install myself in my new construction home. I ended up with this one:

http://www.qualitywatertreatment....osoft.html

Read their site, and look at how to size. Also their online chat and telephone support is TOP NOTCH pre AND post purchase.

Agreed.

With any of the Fleck units, you can have a KDF media filter. It's minimal cost, lasts ~7years, and prolongs the life of your resin if you have high chlorine.

The all in one cabinet units are prone to leaks and not as efficient as seperately tanked units.

When you buy a water softener, with salt based regeneration, you are paying for the valve and the resin mainly. Everything else it freely available for companies to re-sell and package as units. The top two companies that manufacture metered valve heads are Fleck and Clack. Clack has cracked down on internet sales, and usually you will only find them through dealers now.

Fleck is a respected brand, and makes some of the best metered valve heads. It is necessary to properly size your unit based on hardness of your water (which can be found via online water report for most counties with municipal water, or take a sample to a pool store), the number of people in the house, any additional water use, and regeneration.

The capacities listed, are based on how many grains the unit can soften before it needs to be regenerated (flushed with salt brine). Keep in mind, more is not necessarily better. , if you are running a metered unit and it does not regenerate often enough you can run into bridging or the brine tank, and it is not recommended. Ideally, you want to be able to use your capacity and regenerate within 14 day cycles.

I wanted the most efficient, and longest lasting unit I could find for the best value. An electronic metered unit is the best for this. It offers precise measurement, and only regenerates when needed. I also chose to go with the upgraded resin, and upgraded Fleck 6700XTR unit for less water and salt usage. The unit I chose also provides a lifetime warranty, and KDF media filter.

I was surprised to find, based on my usage, and the consumption at my house (3 people, 2400 sq ft, water saving fixtures), I only needed a 24,000 grain softener.



They are higher quality, more efficient, better performance. See above for more comments.

Also, a few other thoughts. After looking close to the spec on the Kenmore, I notice that the flow rate and amount of resin are rather low for the stated softening capacity. These are things to look out for, and noticeable differences between an industry standard unit such as a Fleck.
How much installation cost for a new home?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#35
Quote from kingfisher1111 View Post :
How much installation cost for a new home?
I installed it myself. After much research, watching videos, and the install guide provided it was fairly easy. The new CPVC pipe in homes makes it extremely simple to glue pipe together, I even made new connections to bypass my exterior hose bibs. Make sure to measure/verify the size of your incoming water line to choose the appropriate bypass valve (inlcuded).

I would recommend sketching out a plan on paper, and buying extra fittings, pipe, elbows, unions, etc... and returning what is not used. All-in I had no more than $80 invested in the installation.

I noticed immediately the change in softness. I'm on city water with 12gpg of hardness, and I feel much cleaner after showering. Also, with the media filter, I enjoy the taste of my water more also... decided against a reverse osmosis setup for now.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#36
Quote from ngsm13 View Post :
I installed it myself. After much research, watching videos, and the install guide provided it was fairly easy. The new CPVC pipe in homes makes it extremely simple to glue pipe together, I even made new connections to bypass my exterior hose bibs. Make sure to measure/verify the size of your incoming water line to choose the appropriate bypass valve (inlcuded).

I would recommend sketching out a plan on paper, and buying extra fittings, pipe, elbows, unions, etc... and returning what is not used. All-in I had no more than $80 invested in the installation.

I noticed immediately the change in softness. I'm on city water with 12gpg of hardness, and I feel much cleaner after showering. Also, with the media filter, I enjoy the taste of my water more also... decided against a reverse osmosis setup for now.
You are great. I have zero knowledge in this.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Jul 2008
You cant win with a troll
1,578 Posts
313 Reputation
#37
Quote from tharive View Post :
The only difference in these models is the capacity. Choosing between them depends on the hardness of your water (get it tested), and how often you want the softener to recharge. For example: 24k grain capacity would have to recharge every 1k gallons if your water hardness is 24 grains per gallon.
what do you mean by "recharge"
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#38
The process the softener goes through of putting the salt from brine tank into mineral tank to flush out the hard minerals that are collected in the mineral tank. Once the mineral capacity is reached, it is unable to collect any more hardness from the water and needs to be recharged.

During recharge there is no soft water available which is why softeners with timers are usually see at night.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#39
Quote from kfunk7 View Post :
what do you mean by "recharge"
As posted, the softener has a resin which absorbs minerals. The quantity of resin has a given amount of hardness it can absorb before needing to regenerate (think of this as being flushed/washed). The salt water, or brine, is used to regenerate the resin bed by stripping the absorbed minerals from the resin via ion exchange. As stated soft water is not available during this time, usually time and metered offerings are programmed to regenerate at night (2-3am).

In a properly designed softener, the brine is used to regenerate, and discharged as waste water, and then backwashed/rinsed leaving the resin clean and free from salt.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Jul 2008
You cant win with a troll
1,578 Posts
313 Reputation
#40
Quote from ngsm13 View Post :
As posted, the softener has a resin which absorbs minerals. The quantity of resin has a given amount of hardness it can absorb before needing to regenerate (think of this as being flushed/washed). The salt water, or brine, is used to regenerate the resin bed by stripping the absorbed minerals from the resin via ion exchange. As stated soft water is not available during this time, usually time and metered offerings are programmed to regenerate at night (2-3am).

In a properly designed softener, the brine is used to regenerate, and discharged as waste water, and then backwashed/rinsed leaving the resin clean and free from salt.
does the machine automatically recharge or is it something you have to do manually?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#41
Quote from kfunk7 View Post :
does the machine automatically recharge or is it something you have to do manually?
It's automatic. Two popular ways of automatic regeneration are timed and metered.

Timed, regenerates on a set basis no matter the capacity used/unused (I.e. every 2 weeks). A metered valve is based on gallons used, (usually you input your hardness in gpg, which is grains per gallon), and once you hit the capacity it will regenerate automatically.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#42
Quote from ngsm13 View Post :
I noticed immediately the change in softness. I'm on city water with 12gpg of hardness, and I feel much cleaner after showering. Also, with the media filter, I enjoy the taste of my water more also... decided against a reverse osmosis setup for now.
you're lucky.. i'm in a city where it's 25-27gpg of hardness! what the media filter? and how does that compare to the reverse osmosis setup?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#43
Fleck user here as well! The metered version is much better since it won't waste as much salt because it only regenerates as needed or as scheduled once a week (whichever comes first) instead of every night. Previously had a kenmore one that amazingly lasted 7 years but near the end the water tasted salty! Fleck system has the extra rinse option to clean the resin better thereby getting rid of the salt. Paid around $600 or so for 48,000 grain capacity with diy self install.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#44
Quote from cusco View Post :
you're lucky.. i'm in a city where it's 25-27gpg of hardness! what the media filter? and how does that compare to the reverse osmosis setup?
The media filter is not of the caliber of an RO setup, but it removes chlorine and heavy metals as well as prevents algae and bacteria. It is a first step. For the pure water, RO is still the best choice. But I'm okay with the media filter, softener, and carbon filter for drinking water right now.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#45
People like me that don't want a sulfur smell in the shower or the taste when I brush my teeth in my non ro faucets. The whole home filter is great. I paid $400 for the unit and installed it myself for about $100 in copper and other materials.

Quote from BlackEros View Post :
I can vouch for the fleck systems also. I was going to get one of those crappy throw-away sears systems until I did the research and found out I could get a way superior fleck system for not that much more. I got mine 2 years ago with a computerized demand controller for $1500 installed. Plus why would anyone need a whole house filter?? do you plan on drinking out of every faucet in the house?? That is such a waste, just get a RO system for the kitchen faucet with an icemaker hookup and you are good to go. Here is a tip, you can get an RO system at Costco here for like $150 and install it yourself.

http://www.costco.com/Premier-WP4...58080.html

If you are in Central Florida I highly recommend these guys who did my install.

http://www.awtfla.com/

Lastly Rainsoft systems are good but marked up highly and you are mostly paying for the name, marketing and supporting their sales teams. You are basically getting the same thing with the Fleck Systems for a much more reasonable price.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 3 of 4
1 2 3 4
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)
Link Copied to Clipboard