Forum Thread

How to limit wifi bandwidth to smart tv's

phatrabbitzz 351 30 August 26, 2013 at 02:40 PM
I have two smart TV's and when they're both used to watch a Netflix movie/show the internet on my laptop is incredibly slow.

I'm using D-link DIR-615 router E3.

I entered the following commands per tv (change IP of each tv).

tc qdisc add dev br0 root handle 1: cbq \
avpkt 1000 bandwidth 2mbit

tc class add dev br0 parent 1: classid 1:1 cbq \
rate 700kbit allot 1500 prio 5 bounded isolated

tc filter add dev br0 parent 1: protocol ip \
prio 16 u32 match ip dst 192.168.1.133 flowid 1:1

tc filter add dev br0 parent 1: protocol ip \
prio 16 u32 match ip src 192.168.1.133 flowid 1:1

I also changed to AES from TKIP which I noticed raised my RX from 54 to 130 but when I was looking at the bandwidth status it just showed me that the tv was taking even more bandwidth with that change...Any thoughts on what can I do or how can I verify that the hard limit for the TV is actually set?

I rather not set priority and set a limit of bandwidth.

9 Comments

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#2
Just log in to your Netflix account and set it to stream at a lower bandwidth. Smilie

Video streams NEED to run at the full bandwidth they are encoded for. Once a frame has been missed it's too late to try to send it again. TCP/IP was not designed with streaming videos in mind. Frown
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#3
Limiting the bandwidth with a hard limit, will limit the quality you see, its not a great solution.

I suggest turning on QOS and prioritizing your laptop above the streaming TV's. That way when your not using your computer but you are watching a movie you get the best quality picture. When you are using that machine its traffic should take priority over the streaming. Is your router stock or is running 3rd party firmware to run those commands.

Changing your encryption method should not change your signal strength, especially that much. You have other variables in play. Why did you change from AES to TKIP? There are known vulnerabilities in using WPA2 with TKIP and the only secure method is to use WPA2 with AES. Your TVs should be able to use AES without problem.
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#4
Yea, I'm using DD-WRT firmware, I switched from TKIP to AES, not the other way around. Results of such signal strength with that D-link router seems to be consistent with what I've been reading online. As you mentioned TV was able to use AES without problem, but that just meant that it was hogging even more bandwidth.
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#5
Quote from phatrabbitzz View Post :
Yea, I'm using DD-WRT firmware, I switched from TKIP to AES, not the other way around. Results of such signal strength with that D-link router seems to be consistent with what I've been reading online. As you mentioned TV was able to use AES without problem, but that just meant that it was hogging even more bandwidth.
I'm far from being a networking expert, but I do have a DD-WRT flashed router and I control bandwidth to certain machines in the QOS section (as LiquidRetro mentioned) and it seems to do the trick for me.
I have a guy that comes in everyday and is always hogging all the bandwidth he can get, at the cost of others having slow service and as soon as I put him on "bulk", that was the end of the problem.
In your case, as LR mentioned, with the laptop given priority, the two TV's might not stream as well, but I'm guessing that your laptop biz is more important than watching a flick.
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Last edited by RockySosua August 26, 2013 at 08:32 PM
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#6
One of two things is happening:
1) Two simultaneous Netflix streams consume all of the Mbps that your Internet connection can support. Since you didn't state the speed of your Internet connection, we can't tell if that is the case.

2) The two TV's WiFi connections are consuming all of the RF (wireless) bandwidth. This is complicated to understand, but it goes like this: At 2.4 GHz, the radios can transmit 2.4 billion radio cycles per second. They "modulate" TCP packets around this carrier frequency. The tighter they modulate their TCP packets into the signal, the faster it goes. 802.11n can modulate more packets into a 2.4 GHz signal than 802.11b or g, for example. But cheaper WiFi adapters don't support the high speed modulation techniques. And as distance increases, a WiFi unit will automatically scale down to "looser," lower speed modulation. So you can get up to 40 mbits a sec with a 2.4 GHz radio, but if one of the clients scales down to 8 mbit/second modulation, then that's all that is available on the whole WiFi network. Quality of Service won't help in that case.

3) Some streaming technologies will forward buffer as much video as they can. So one of your Netflix boxes could be buffering 500 MB of data, which would hog all of your Internet until the buffer fills. But I don't know if this is the case with the client; you'd have to test it with a packet sniffer or similar.
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#7
The best way I see to limit bandwidth is QoS. If you router supports it than use it. Configure the router to reserve an ip for him and limit the bandwidth to that ip or limited by mac address.
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#8
Quote from Rebound View Post :
One of two things is happening:
1) Two simultaneous Netflix streams consume all of the Mbps that your Internet connection can support. Since you didn't state the speed of your Internet connection, we can't tell if that is the case.

2) The two TV's WiFi connections are consuming all of the RF (wireless) bandwidth. This is complicated to understand, but it goes like this: At 2.4 GHz, the radios can transmit 2.4 billion radio cycles per second. They "modulate" TCP packets around this carrier frequency. The tighter they modulate their TCP packets into the signal, the faster it goes. 802.11n can modulate more packets into a 2.4 GHz signal than 802.11b or g, for example. But cheaper WiFi adapters don't support the high speed modulation techniques. And as distance increases, a WiFi unit will automatically scale down to "looser," lower speed modulation. So you can get up to 40 mbits a sec with a 2.4 GHz radio, but if one of the clients scales down to 8 mbit/second modulation, then that's all that is available on the whole WiFi network. Quality of Service won't help in that case.

3) Some streaming technologies will forward buffer as much video as they can. So one of your Netflix boxes could be buffering 500 MB of data, which would hog all of your Internet until the buffer fills. But I don't know if this is the case with the client; you'd have to test it with a packet sniffer or similar.
I'm fairly certain it's #1, since my internet is 3Mbps, which is why I'm trying to do traffic control.
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#9
Quote from phatrabbitzz View Post :
I'm fairly certain it's #1, since my internet is 3Mbps, which is why I'm trying to do traffic control.
Are you doing that with the QOS in your router?
If not, that's what you have to do.
Give your laptop a higher priority, end of story.
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#10
Quote from RockySosua View Post :
Are you doing that with the QOS in your router?
If not, that's what you have to do.
Give your laptop a higher priority, end of story.
I think he means that his internet is the 3mb package. I agree though that QOS will solve this or at least improve the situation the most that can be without an internet upgrade.
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