Forum Thread

Any work arounds for setting up backups to a network drive in Win 7 Home Premium?

someone28624 10,931 434 September 14, 2015 at 08:24 AM
I have been backing up my computer to an internal secondary 1 tb hard drive. It's filled now. I have a 3 tb network attached drive my MacBook backs up to. Now I have it mounted and visible in Windows, but I'm realizing that there's a paywall that prevents me from backing up to it in windows. Not only that- in the era of Windows 10, I can't even pay to get past it!

I've googled about this, and it seems an option is to create a virtual hard drive. However, I have no idea how to determine the path to put in when creating the hard drive.

Another option I found is to back up to a local folder and create an automated routine to move that to the network drive and delete the local copy. This is also way over my head.

Any advice?

Thanks!

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#2
Quote from someone28624 View Post :
I have been backing up my computer to an internal secondary 1 tb hard drive. It's filled now. I have a 3 tb network attached drive my MacBook backs up to. Now I have it mounted and visible in Windows, but I'm realizing that there's a paywall that prevents me from backing up to it in windows. Not only that- in the era of Windows 10, I can't even pay to get past it!

I've googled about this, and it seems an option is to create a virtual hard drive. However, I have no idea how to determine the path to put in when creating the hard drive.

Another option I found is to back up to a local folder and create an automated routine to move that to the network drive and delete the local copy. This is also way over my head.

Any advice?

Thanks!

Can't speak to the Apple\Mac drive. However, you should get yourself a portable hard drive and back it up via usb 3 imo. 1 TB portable drives can be had for less than 50 dollars on sale. 2 Tb portables for $65-80 on sale depending on the make. Far better and easier than trying to connect to some proprietary drive or copying it to the network drive each time.

I would also advise getting a real backup program (Shadow Protect, Acronis, etc.) and not relying on Windows backup, but that is me.
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Last edited by YanksIn2009 September 14, 2015 at 09:16 AM
#3
Third party backup software is definitely the way to go. Any reasonably full featured product will connect to your NAS directly without needing your copy scripts or resorting to USB storage.

What sort of backups are you doing? I've been using Veeam, which is free, to do incremental full disk image backups to a NAS drive, and it's been working well.
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Joined Mar 2009
Schrödinger's Frog
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#4
I'd probably try mapping the network path to a drive letter, but I can't guarantee that will work in this situation.
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#5
Quote from Frogstar View Post :
I'd probably try mapping the network path to a drive letter, but I can't guarantee that will work in this situation.
Yeah, I'd suggest the drive letter mapping trick, but it has a history of not working with backup programs because the drive letter is setup up for the user but the backup engine often runs as a system service.

Crashplan had a complicated set of hacks to get around this, but in looking then up I discovered that mapping drive letters now works with crashplan, so OP might want to give that a shot. A lot of people here use and like Crashplan for backup.
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