Forum Thread

do i need good hardware in my system for do large data transfer?

br1ckhouse 339 50 September 16, 2015 at 09:03 PM
My nonprofit does tax work and part of that work involves e-filing tax returns to the state and the IRS. I asked my staff to look at the task manager when e-fling to see how much resources it takes up as we need to replace some aging systems.

She reported that when e-filing from either her core 2 duo desktop and one of our quad-core xeon cpu servers, both were well below 60% of cpu capacity and at most was 30% higher than idle. The server has 16 gb ram and it never used more than 25% of memory while e-filing. The core 2 probably has 3 gb ram.

She did say that it made a difference in e-filing speed if she used the server vs. the core 2 duo desktop.

As I need to replace these systems, I am wondering what drives the faster processing speed when e-filing, is it the number of cores in the cpu and/or is it something with the memory?

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#2
No, and I doubt it's actually that large of a data transfer. It may take awhile, but that doesn't mean it's actually that much bandwidth. The software you're running, your internet connection, the server your connecting to at the state or irs, and demand are all probably bigger factors.

If I were to answer that question based only on the thread title, then yes faster drives eg ssd will yield a big improvement in the speeds of a large data transfer on your lan or from one drive to another. However I wouldn't expect it to make much difference for efiling. When you efile, it's mostly an exchange of some text information possibly some attached images. If you're filing thousands of returns then it adds up, but other factors make a bigger difference.
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Last edited by jkee September 16, 2015 at 09:51 PM
#3
As was noted, it is not likely to make much of a difference in the transfer of data for your purposes.

That said, if you are running Core 2 Duos then it is well past time to upgrade there. While they are probably still just barely use-able for Windows 7 and basic computing needs, their time has pretty much passed.

As to what drives performance, there are many factors and it really depends on the type of tasks involved. Heavy computational work will be more affected by CPU. Heavy data\database work will be a function of CPU, disk performance and memory. Memory is always relevant if the processes involved can at peak load use all of available physical memory and as such the disk is used as an additional memory pool\page file. Magnetic disk is orders of magnitude slower than memory which is why when machines do not have enough memory to handle the peak load of the applications running on them, they will often exhibit a severe degradation of performance.

Which is why as a general rule of thumb you build in 50% slack\expansion for memory in a higher end database server when you plan it our (at least that is what I used to try to do assuming one is buying a physical, dedicated server with a 3-4 year life expectancy and not going the virtualization route). Memory is fairly cheap these days and having some ordering system or key application crash or get bogged down because you tried to save 16 or 32 GB on a server is just silly from a cost vs benefit analysis and operational perspective.
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Last edited by YanksIn2009 September 16, 2015 at 10:25 PM
#4
Quote from br1ckhouse View Post :
My nonprofit does tax work and part of that work involves e-filing tax returns to the state and the IRS. I asked my staff to look at the task manager when e-fling to see how much resources it takes up as we need to replace some aging systems.

She reported that when e-filing from either her core 2 duo desktop and one of our quad-core xeon cpu servers, both were well below 60% of cpu capacity and at most was 30% higher than idle. The server has 16 gb ram and it never used more than 25% of memory while e-filing. The core 2 probably has 3 gb ram.

She did say that it made a difference in e-filing speed if she used the server vs. the core 2 duo desktop.

As I need to replace these systems, I am wondering what drives the faster processing speed when e-filing, is it the number of cores in the cpu and/or is it something with the memory?
Yes, you need a reliable one.
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#5
Quote from YanksIn2009 View Post :
As was noted, it is not likely to make much of a difference in the transfer of data for your purposes.

That said, if you are running Core 2 Duos then it is well past time to upgrade there. While they are probably still just barely use-able for Windows 7 and basic computing needs, their time has pretty much passed.

As to what drives performance, there are many factors and it really depends on the type of tasks involved. Heavy computational work will be more affected by CPU. Heavy data\database work will be a function of CPU, disk performance and memory. Memory is always relevant if the processes involved can at peak load use all of available physical memory and as such the disk is used as an additional memory pool\page file. Magnetic disk is orders of magnitude slower than memory which is why when machines do not have enough memory to handle the peak load of the applications running on them, they will often exhibit a severe degradation of performance.

Which is why as a general rule of thumb you build in 50% slack\expansion for memory in a higher end database server when you plan it our (at least that is what I used to try to do assuming one is buying a physical, dedicated server with a 3-4 year life expectancy and not going the virtualization route). Memory is fairly cheap these days and having some ordering system or key application crash or get bogged down because you tried to save 16 or 32 GB on a server is just silly from a cost vs benefit analysis and operational perspective.
thanks for the advice!
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