Forum Thread

laptop supet slow OS Drive partition maxed out

dvcbwvfans 475 32 September 30, 2015 at 06:55 PM
Have a Dell Inspirion 1564 with Windows 7 Home Premium installed that my kids use. Its running slow as molasses and looking at the drive space it says OS (C) is basically full- 900MB free of 58.5GB and the local drive (D) is basically empty with 159GB free of 164GB.

Would this full OS (C) drive be a reason nothing will basically run on it, inluding IE and Windows Update etc? If so, would moving space from (D) to (C) help speed up the little guy?
I tried to search for options to move the drive space around, but couldnt find anything that worked well with my not so techy skills.

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#2
There was a very recent thread here about minimizing C: drive usage: http://slickdeals.net/f/8130114-windows-7-pro-64bit-grew-without-hibernate?v=1. Take a look at some of the responses there for ways to categorize your space usage and move your data over to D:.

900MB is not nearly enough free space on C, so yes, I think getting data off there an onto D: will help you out a lot.
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Last edited by quotidian September 30, 2015 at 07:11 PM
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#3
Yes a full C partition would cause the system to slow down considerably.
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Vague questions receive vague answers . . . . . .
#4
There is absolutely no reason for the C drive to be so full and you can most definitely either delete or transfer some of the data to the D drive.

The OS will not need 60GB to function, that's for sure.

My guess is, that the C drive is being filled up with:

1) Temporary Internet files - can be deleted with easy clean-up programs like CCleaner - You can also change the location where you browser stores the temporary files. However it's not easily explained, but if you bother to Google, you can find some tutorials to show you how. No need to store all that temporary stuff on the OS drive.

2) Downloaded files. Usually when you download something from the internet, it's stored on C. Most of those files can be easily moved elsewhere if needed, though very often a lot of it is useless junk you can delete.

3) Desktop files. The deskop is basically an extension of the C drive in most cases. Which means that everything lying on the desktop is taking up room on the C drive. I suggest moving any files or folders to the D drive and making a shortcut of them to place on the desktop instead. The shortcut takes no room and provides just as easy of an access to those files or folders.

4) Large programs. In most cases, when you install any program or piece of software, it's by default installed on the C drive. However, this is not necessary. With limited space on the C drive, I suggest installing any larger program on the D drive instead. Simply transfering the files may cause issues, so you might have to uninstall a program and remove all traces of it and then re-install it on the D drive.


Those are the things off the top of my head.
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#5
winsxs can grow large sometimes.
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#6
Quote from dvcbwvfans View Post :
Would this full OS (C) drive be a reason nothing will basically run on it, inluding IE and Windows Update etc?
It could be a reason, but it may not be the (only) reason. Offloading user data to the D drive, as others have mentioned, is an excellent first step, but there may be a lot of other crap running that doesn't need to be, further slowing the machine down. Make sure to post back here with an update after the drive has more space.
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Last edited by mmathis October 1, 2015 at 10:17 AM
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#7
Quote from Jake591 View Post :
4) Large programs. In most cases, when you install any program or piece of software, it's by default installed on the C drive. However, this is not necessary. With limited space on the C drive, I suggest installing any larger program on the D drive instead. Simply transfering the files may cause issues, so you might have to uninstall a program and remove all traces of it and then re-install it on the D drive..
I don't think this is really necessary. Most programs should be installed on the C drive for simplicity. The one common exception I will note is Steam games (but not Steam itself; that should still go on C), because Steam makes it easy to maintain installations across several drives (and move games from one to the other). Office, Chrome, etc should all be installed on C, because frankly, there's no good reason not to.

That said, you want to size your OS drive / partition large enough to handle the OS as well your program installations. A 60 GB drive seems, at first glance, large enough for the OP since his D drive is not very full.
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#8
Quote from mmathis View Post :
I don't think this is really necessary. Most programs should be installed on the C drive for simplicity. The one common exception I will note is Steam games (but not Steam itself; that should still go on C), because Steam makes it easy to maintain installations across several drives (and move games from one to the other). Office, Chrome, etc should all be installed on C, because frankly, there's no good reason not to.

That said, you want to size your OS drive / partition large enough to handle the OS as well your program installations. A 60 GB drive seems, at first glance, large enough for the OP since his D drive is not very full.
I think it's pretty easy to get into the habit of replacing c: with d: when installing large programs. It really doesn't affect management much either. You still remove them using add/remove programs and launch them from the start menu. That they're installed to d:\program files really shouldn't ever come up.
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#9
Quote from quotidian View Post :
I think it's pretty easy to get into the habit of replacing c: with d: when installing large programs. It really doesn't affect management much either. You still remove them using add/remove programs and launch them from the start menu. That they're installed to d:\program files really shouldn't ever come up.
But there's no point other than drive space - and drive space is cheap. You can't take that D drive and throw it in another computer and use the programs. You can't put another C drive in the computer and use the programs on the D drive. All it does is take up space on your D drive - the drive holding user data which can be moved from computer to computer. Keep the user data on D, and the OS and programs on C.
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#10
Quote from mmathis View Post :
But there's no point other than drive space - and drive space is cheap. You can't take that D drive and throw it in another computer and use the programs. You can't put another C drive in the computer and use the programs on the D drive. All it does is take up space on your D drive - the drive holding user data which can be moved from computer to computer. Keep the user data on D, and the OS and programs on C.
Well yes, the entire point is drive space. The op has a 60gb c: drive, which means for them disk space is not cheap. In general for anyone that has a small ssd running their OS, drive space on c: comes at something of a premium. Space on the mechanical d: drive on the other hand is cheap.

You do raise a good point about moving a disk between machines, but that's a pretty rare occurrence.
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#11
go to diskmgmt.msc (type in search)
Shrink D, shrink a little just enough for files currently in D
then create a E with that new space
copy all files in D to E
then delete D
Expand C, 20gb or all the way if don't care speed.
then....
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#12
Quote from Left4Deal View Post :
go to diskmgmt.msc (type in search)
Shrink D, shrink a little just enough for files currently in D
then create a E with that new space
copy all files in D to E
then delete D
Expand C, 20gb or all the way if don't care speed.
then....
Thanks first off I cleared up about 13gb last night by removing an old tomtom folder with backups that found its way to hide out on the C partition. Good start.
When I go to disk management I can right click on D partiton I can shrink the volume and it creates a new non named disk or something next to the D with that same space D was reduced by showing. when I right click on the C partition I do not have an option to expand C, it is grayed out. I would like to keep D but just reduce it some and use that to expand C. I seem to be lost a bit
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#13
the non named disk is empty space, can create another disk, shrinking will create empty space behind that disk (on the right side of the disk), and expanding is the same, so you have to delete D before can expand C

~~~~~~~~~~~
now you don't have to shrink, C will be slower if expand.

maybe just move some personal folder to D
C:\users\user name\
choose properties of some of the folders can move to another location (desktop, my picture, etc ), it will ask if you want to move the files as well. (i like to just change the origin link C to D, became D:\users\user name\, or create new folder, just don't choose the root D;\ , it will be messy)
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Last edited by Left4Deal October 1, 2015 at 05:25 PM
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#14
Quote from Left4Deal View Post :
the non named disk is empty space, can create another disk, shrinking will create empty space behind that disk (on the right side of the disk), and expanding is the same, so you have to delete D before can expand C
When I shrink D should I right click on the the new space created to the right of it and select new simple volume to get the new drive setup so I can later expand C?
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#15
maybe what i said is confusing, expanding can not have the D in the middle of C and the empty space, so you have to delete D.

once it's created new volume, can't be used to expand.
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