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Difference between windows server and Synology NAS

juiooui 26 10 October 7, 2015 at 03:33 PM
WHat is th edifference between a windows server abd a sysnology NAS? donthey both retain and serve files to computers onthe network? I take it a windows server holds files on the system to access from a computer, dosent the sysnolgy NAS do the same?

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#2
A windows server is perfectly capable of being used as a NAS device. The tradeoffs are roughly the same as you always make when comparing a purpose-built device and a general purpose computer:

A dedicated NAS is smaller, quieter, and uses less power. Configuration and maintenance are also usually easier. A Windows server is the opposite of those things, but can do more general purpose tasks as well.
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#3
Really depends on what your goals are. Also Synology box is a linux based OS, tends to have a slower processor, lower power, less room for drives, etc.
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#4
A home NAS is usually a $200-$400 box that can hold a few drives and serve files over a network. It may be able to do a few other tasks. It can also fit in a cabinet next to your router/modem and makes little or no sound and requires little maintenance for home users.

A Windows Server is a full PC. It's going to cost more, use a lot more power, run louder and hotter, require a large space and require more software customization that a normal home user may not be comfortable with. But, it can do a lot and could be expanded to a lot of storage.

Those are broad generalizations, but cover most use cases pretty well. What are you looking to accomplish?
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#5
Quote from dukeblue219 View Post :
A home NAS is usually a $200-$400 box that can hold a few drives and serve files over a network. It may be able to do a few other tasks. It can also fit in a cabinet next to your router/modem and makes little or no sound and requires little maintenance for home users.

A Windows Server is a full PC. It's going to cost more, use a lot more power, run louder and hotter, require a large space and require more software customization that a normal home user may not be comfortable with. But, it can do a lot and could be expanded to a lot of storage.

Those are broad generalizations, but cover most use cases pretty well. What are you looking to accomplish?
Good explanation. More on the windows server it could be a server for a program, do group policy, Host windows updates or WSUS, etc. A lot it can do just depending on what you want to do.
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#6
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Good explanation. More on the windows server it could be a server for a program, do group policy, Host windows updates or WSUS, etc. A lot it can do just depending on what you want to do.
You can also do what I highlighted in bold on a linux or freebsd NAS, although at some point I guess you are blurring the lines between server and NAS and the term becomes purpose driven instead of hardware driven. Also have heard of people running NAS' in VMs although that's not really my cup of tea due to hardware limitations of the VM OS.
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