Forum Thread

Amazon Fire question

WENCH1109 2,006 837 October 26, 2015 at 02:01 PM
I just received an email from Retail Me Not they are showing Amazon has a Fire for $49.00.
My uncle is starting Dementia/Senility and used to be able to handle a computer but lately it is becoming too much for him to remember how to do things.
I'll get him set up doing something and the next day he'll call saying he forgot his password etc.
Right now he is locked out of his computer because he can't remember the PW he set up to log on.
I mentioned that a tablet might be easier and he was interested in one.

I don't know anything about the Fire, so if anybody has one I would love an opinion on it.
Is it easy to set up?
And what about watching videos of movies, do you have to have Prime?
Really what I'm asking is"if I get it setup for him before I give it to him,will he be able to just start using it?

Any and all opinions welcome.

Thanks

4 Comments

1

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#2
I know several who purchased this for their elderly parents and it seems to have gone well. With all smartphones/tablets there is a small learning curve for basic functionality.

The answer is yes, an elderly person with physical and mental limitations could learn to use this device. The reality is it depends on how the person normally handles learning. If they won't/can't learn to use their TV remote control this will be no different.

A brief demonstration is advisable. Usually if you have accounts pre-logged in you are good to go and can show them instagram, email, web surfing, etc.

You do not have to have Prime for usage. But if you want access to movies or shows you will likely need a subscription to Prime, Hulu, Netflix, or some other venue in order to find shows.

For $50, this is a decent device. The usage is mostly straight-forward. This falls into the category of, for $50 it is worth a shot and if it doesn't work out the tablet is still useful for other purposes. I say give it a go and hopefully it helps your uncle's ability to gain access to digital media and communicate.
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#3
Quote from eekthecat View Post :
I know several who purchased this for their elderly parents and it seems to have gone well. With all smartphones/tablets there is a small learning curve for basic functionality.

The answer is yes, an elderly person with physical and mental limitations could learn to use this device. The reality is it depends on how the person normally handles learning. If they won't/can't learn to use their TV remote control this will be no different.

A brief demonstration is advisable. Usually if you have accounts pre-logged in you are good to go and can show them instagram, email, web surfing, etc.

You do not have to have Prime for usage. But if you want access to movies or shows you will likely need a subscription to Prime, Hulu, Netflix, or some other venue in order to find shows.

For $50, this is a decent device. The usage is mostly straight-forward. This falls into the category of, for $50 it is worth a shot and if it doesn't work out the tablet is still useful for other purposes. I say give it a go and hopefully it helps your uncle's ability to gain access to digital media and communicate.



Thanks so much for your reply.
It was very informative.
He lives alone and just turned 72 and as I said used to be able to do a lot on the computer until just recently.I know it has a lot to do with him not being able to retain things I have told him.And as a result he is just sitting watching TV and movies and doesn't even bother going in the next room and turning the computer on.
Maybe if he has this handy he will fiddle with it.Hopefully it will stimulate his memory some.

I think I'll give it a try and like you said get it mostly set up before I give it to him.

Thanks again.
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#4
A tablet with a physical home button (samsung or apple) may be more intuitive than one that uses soft buttons. I generally find stock android a bit more intuitive than amazon's fire os.
It shouldn't be that hard to reset the password on his computer and remove the password or set it to auto login.

It's probably a good idea to see a doctor that doesn't just write it off as typical aging there may be something treatable happening.
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Last edited by jkee October 26, 2015 at 05:28 PM
#5
Quote from WENCH1109 View Post :
Thanks so much for your reply.
It was very informative.
He lives alone and just turned 72 and as I said used to be able to do a lot on the computer until just recently.I know it has a lot to do with him not being able to retain things I have told him.And as a result he is just sitting watching TV and movies and doesn't even bother going in the next room and turning the computer on.
Maybe if he has this handy he will fiddle with it.Hopefully it will stimulate his memory some.

I think I'll give it a try and like you said get it mostly set up before I give it to him.

Thanks again.
No problem. Keep the icon list simple and clean and that seems to help. Take off any icon/app that won't be used as that will make it harder to navigate.

One thing I found that they really seem to like is Instagram if family uses that. You can setup an account and leave it logged in and already following family members and they can just open it up and see what's going on. It helps them feel connected. Facebook is probably too daunting for most elderly.
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