Forum Thread

How to add new cable or dish wiring into attic

callpocket 11,144 3,058 October 30, 2015 at 07:49 PM
I recently bought a house that has brick up about 8 feet or so on the outside, but the peaks have wood siding. There are several equipment boxes attached to the side of the house -- cable TV and Telephone at this time. I would like to possibly add Dish TV, but have not got that far in this total gut and remodel.

I'm seeing several wires for cable TV that go from the equipment box attached to the brick and run 'around' the house and then enter thru a hole drilled into each room. I'd like to change this and have wires that run 'upward' from the equipment box and enter the attic through the wood siding that is in one of the peaks. I'm thinking there is some sort of plastic box to do this with -- it would look a lot like a dryer vent cap, but would have insulation and holes for each wire to go through, so the water would run off and it would be pretty much bug proof. Do they make such and entry box to the attic for these type wires?

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#2
not sure about one specific to wires.
http://www.rectorseal.com/index.p...ng-system/ this one is for ac lineset install

Is this an older house or newer brick construction? Newer is just a brick front with 2x4 walls on the inside.
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#3
The house was built in 1979. It has brick up about 8 or so feet and then the peaks are finished with T-111 wood siding. Your link is interesting, but this is not for HVAC lines. Those are run thru the slab.


this shows the front, but the peak on the end is pretty much the same -- so you can see it's wood at the peak above the brick.
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Last edited by callpocket October 30, 2015 at 09:01 PM
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#4
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#5
Quote from callpocket View Post :
I recently bought a house that has brick up about 8 feet or so on the outside, but the peaks have wood siding. ...
but would have insulation and holes for each wire to go through, so the water would run off and it would be pretty much bug proof. Do they make such and entry box to the attic for these type wires?
You've already got holes in the bricks/mortar, I'd probably leave it as is. A "drip loop" is what is most commonly used to keep water from following a cable inside.

Fishing wires down an exterior insulated wall is a pain, but slightly easier at the gable ends. If you're going so far as to remove drywall on exterior walls, then by all means run the cable up the wall into the attic. If you run wires to interior walls, it would be easiest to run them to a central location inside the house. You could run Ethernet at the same time. You'd need 2-3 coax from this location to the exterior (assuming cable internet + satellite tv).

Architecturally, your house looks a little older than 1979 to me. It looks like something may be leaking with the gutter on the right based on how wet the bricks and mortar at the corner look.
That looks like a useful website, I'm surprised I haven't seen that one before. I do take issue with a few things they show, in particular: I'd never use a junction box with a built in clamp, I'd never staple wires in the manner they show which could easily damage the wires, and some of the advice about running cables through duct work is questionable..

There have been a number of threads where we've discussed wiring a house for ethernet/coax, most recently:
http://slickdeals.net/f/8154936-how-to-wire-whole-house-with-ethernet-ports?p=78690512#6
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Last edited by jkee November 1, 2015 at 02:59 PM
#6
They have different styles. You just buy the hood and seal with duct seal
something similar
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1-Gang-Low...0748320609
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Last edited by stufine October 31, 2015 at 02:08 PM
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#7
Back when we owned a condo, it was the same story. built in 1977 with firewalls between, it was very difficult to run wires inconspicuously internally, so the installers would just drill through the siding, leaving wires snaked all over the place like vines.

I did 2 things to fix this:
- find a routing from the basement to the 2nd floor. We did not have an attic, so to get to rooms in the front of the place I now had a method to get them there, and I left access panels in hidden places like behind the 1st floor bath sink, under a carpet, etc
- re-route all the existing wires to a proper entry point using electrical conduit/LB's [homedepot.com]. The benefit to that is since it's round you can drill tight holes for the exterior penetration and seal them well. It';s cheap and you can paint it to match the house.
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#8
Quote from bargeit View Post :
doing it from inside

http://www.structuredhomewiring.c...stingHome/
Great site, I am getting ready to run some cat5 in existing walls and this will come in super helpful.
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#9
Quote from jkee View Post :
You've already got holes in the bricks/mortar, I'd probably leave it as is. A "drip loop" is what is most commonly used to keep water from following a cable inside.

Fishing wires down an exterior insulated wall is a pain, but slightly easier at the gable ends. If you're going so far as to remove drywall on exterior walls, then by all means run the cable up the wall into the attic. If you run wires to interior walls, it would be easiest to run them to a central location inside the house. You could run Ethernet at the same time. You'd need 2-3 coax from this location to the exterior (assuming cable internet + satellite tv).

Architecturally, your house looks a little older than 1979 to me. It looks like something may be leaking with the gutter on the right based on how wet the bricks and mortar at the corner look.

That looks like a useful website, I'm surprised I haven't seen that one before. I do take issue with a few things they show, in particular: I'd never use a junction box with a built in clamp, I'd never staple wires in the manner they show which could easily damage the wires, and some of the advice about running cables through duct work is questionable..

There have been a number of threads where we've discussed wiring a house for ethernet/coax, most recently:
http://slickdeals.net/f/8154936-how-to-wire-whole-house-with-ethernet-ports?p=78690512#6
Excellent call on the gutter issue!! EEK! The pic above was taken after a pretty good rain from what I can tell. I have seen some dampness in the corner where the gutter is and found that the drain spout goes straight down and has no el on the bottom to kick water away from the house -- so it spashes there. I found a void in the mortar between the corner bricks and the slab. Also, the downspout is not in good shape -- it appears to be taped together and painted over and the screws that hold it to the brick, well, it's a pretty shabby job that was done some years ago. Needs to be replaced and redone. I have addressed this with the roofer -- thank you for pointing it out!
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#10
Quote from stufine View Post :
They have different styles. You just buy the hood and seal with duct seal
something similar
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/1-Gang-Low...0748320609
Very good idea for the inside of the house. I will check into getting those for that application. However, I don't think the plastic in these is rated for exterior applications.

Quote from Dr. J View Post :
Back when we owned a condo, it was the same story. built in 1977 with firewalls between, it was very difficult to run wires inconspicuously internally, so the installers would just drill through the siding, leaving wires snaked all over the place like vines.

I did 2 things to fix this:
- find a routing from the basement to the 2nd floor. We did not have an attic, so to get to rooms in the front of the place I now had a method to get them there, and I left access panels in hidden places like behind the 1st floor bath sink, under a carpet, etc
- re-route all the existing wires to a proper entry point using electrical conduit/LB's [homedepot.com]. The benefit to that is since it's round you can drill tight holes for the exterior penetration and seal them well. It';s cheap and you can paint it to match the house.
Ding, Ding, Ding -- BINGO!!! I believe this is EXACTLY what I need. Thank you!!
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Last edited by callpocket November 2, 2015 at 04:00 PM
#11
Quote from callpocket View Post :
I have addressed this with the roofer -- thank you for pointing it out!
Masonry and gutters (to a lesser extent) are a little outside most roofer's wheelhouses. One of two things will happen, they'll subcontract with someone competent or they'll try to do it themselves with a potentially flawed approach. Hopefully it all works out well.
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#12
Typically you just drill a hole slightly larger than the wire, run one wire in and splitter it on the inside. You put a dab of caulk around the wire and everything is done.

Am I missing something? Why are you running lots of wires from the NID?
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#13
Quote from TeeDub View Post :
Typically you just drill a hole slightly larger than the wire, run one wire in and splitter it on the inside. You put a dab of caulk around the wire and everything is done.

Am I missing something? Why are you running lots of wires from the NID?

That method is tremendously hack. Also the entry point leaves a spot for water infiltration.

I laughed when I was going to have Dish installed and the installer thought nothing of just running a drill through the exterior of the house to accomplish that.
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#14
Not sure where you live but for me I want the dish where I can get to it in case of snow buildup. Most of the cable.satellite companies now offer wireless boxes or one box connects to the outside and the rest can all talk using the internal coax and MOCA so no need to do outside runs at all. you can do all your runs in the attic and depending on which way the house faces put the dish on the right side facing the house just up into the attic and split from there.
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#15
Try to use plastic pipe to put inside the 1 inch of the wall .
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