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What's the second best way to remove new computer bloatware?

someone28624 10,931 434 November 12, 2015 at 11:30 PM
I'm setting up my uncle's new computer for him. Obviously a fresh OS install is the surest way to remove bloatware. What's next best? Is Decrap My Computer any good? Appears to have mixed reviews.

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#2
If you don't want to do it manually, pc decrapifier is one of the better choices: https://www.pcdecrapifier.com/

You can also use something like ccleaner to look at startup programs and disable them or uninstall them
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#3
Quote from someone28624 View Post :
I'm setting up my uncle's new computer for him. Obviously a fresh OS install is the surest way to remove bloatware. What's next best? Is Decrap My Computer any good? Appears to have mixed reviews.

If you reinstall the OS from the manufacturer copy (e.g. MS) vs. OEM (Dell) - that shouldn't have any bloatware. That's THE best way. In fact, whenever I get a new PC that's the first thing I do.
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#4
What OEM? Most of the Dells I have setup for people as of late really comes with a lot less than they did in the early 2000s. I usually do it manually b/c it's just a handfull of things. Some of the things are actually useful and you should keep. Dell for instance has a program to keep drivers, and bios up to date. You probably want that one.
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#5
Quote from someone28624 View Post :
What's next best?
Manually uninstall from Programs - its not that hard to do, these days the OEM junk is a bit less than it used to be too. Adding another program to clear the junk is just adding on more junk IMO.
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#6
Quote from neteng101 View Post :
Manually uninstall from Programs - its not that hard to do, these days the OEM junk is a bit less than it used to be too. Adding another program to clear the junk is just adding on more junk IMO.
^This. It's very easy. I think people have fear of what could be there even though it's not there and they demand a fresh install. You are perfectly safe to just remove the applications. A fresh install is fine and nothing wrong with doing it but in most cases it is unnecessary and generally takes a bit more time or possibly additional skill.

Everyone has a preference and is entitled to that preference. The "must be fresh install" is mostly paranoia today but gives some users peace of mind.
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#7
Quote from eekthecat View Post :
^This. It's very easy. I think people have fear of what could be there even though it's not there and they demand a fresh install. You are perfectly safe to just remove the applications. A fresh install is fine and nothing wrong with doing it but in most cases it is unnecessary and generally takes a bit more time or possibly additional skill.

Everyone has a preference and is entitled to that preference. The "must be fresh install" is mostly paranoia today but gives some users peace of mind.
It's generally been a windows problem that uninstalling leaves a bunch of garbage behind in the registry and across the file system. Maybe this is better with windows 10? I haven't heard anything to that effect. But back in the day when I used windows up to 7, this was the logic behind doing full-blown reinstall.
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#8
Quote from Ero View Post :
It's generally been a windows problem that uninstalling leaves a bunch of garbage behind in the registry and across the file system.
If you want to be extra careful then uninstall, and run AdwCleaner and CCleaner in case any of that junk has some of that tracking stuff tagged on. That should clean any garbage left behind.
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#9
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
What OEM? Most of the Dells I have setup for people as of late really comes with a lot less than they did in the early 2000s. I usually do it manually b/c it's just a handfull of things. Some of the things are actually useful and you should keep. Dell for instance has a program to keep drivers, and bios up to date. You probably want that one.

Expanding on my earlier post, first I'll go to the OEM site and d/l all the appropriate drivers and whatnot for the PC and OS I am installing and put them on the installation media. If we are speaking about Dell, the utilities you speak of are included on their site. Very easy to d/l and install ONLY what you want on the PC than try and excise it from the install after the fact. I still advocate installing a manufacturer version of the OS THEN installing drivers and utils.

"Back in the day" it used to be much more of a problem doing this as even what we would now consider "basic" peripherals and such, have native OS support (Win10). It used to be you had to sideload drivers or do other tricks to get the OS to install properly (think SSD's with WinXP), but now you can count on at least basic functionality (including NIC/wifi drivers) when you boot up the machine for the first time so you aren't left in a lurch. You can then over-install more appropriate/streamlined drivers.
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Last edited by Dr. J November 13, 2015 at 01:31 PM
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