Forum Thread

What are the proper upgrade steps? (computer components)

mkarias1 969 136 November 20, 2015 at 06:05 PM
I am upgrading my primitive computer (Intel Core 2 Duo E7200; 4GB RAM; XFX HD6870; W7). I am upgrading the CPU, motherboard, RAM, swapping HD for SSD and upgrading to Windows 10 (clean install). My question is what is the proper steps to upgrade. I assume I cannot do everything at once since a SSD is replacing the HD and also Windows will fail (activation) as it thinks its a new computer (which it is). So what should I do first, second, etc.?

I do not know if these are the right steps or if I am doing more work than needed:

1) Clone HD to SSD. 2) Replace CPU, MB & RAM. 3) Upgrade to Windows 10.

Thanks.

14 Comments

1

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#2
since you are doing clean install, it is not update.
you just need to remove all old items, install new items and load W10.
after that connect your old drive as slave with data.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#3
Quote from dude2000 View Post :
since you are doing clean install, it is not update.
you just need to remove all old items, install new items and load W10.
after that connect your old drive as slave with data.
OP wants to use his old license on the new machine...that may be problematic depending on where the old license camera from....
The new release of w10 allows you to use a windows 7 key to activate..that might work here..not sure if it differentiates between oem keys and retail keys.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#4
Seriously, you would be better off just getting a new machine than trying to upgrade a Core 2 Duo. You can get a cheap i5 based desktop for under 350-450 dollars, Windows license included. Spending money on a new MB, Ram, HD, processor to try and save the case and power supply is just a complete waste of time and not cost effective imo. My 2 cents.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by YanksIn2009 November 20, 2015 at 08:37 PM
Joined Jul 2009
L10: Grand Master
9,234 Posts
2,201 Reputation
#5
That was my first thought also. Perhaps OP got the replacements for free.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Jan 2008
L5: Journeyman
969 Posts
136 Reputation
Original Poster
#6
Quote from fenderman View Post :
OP wants to use his old license on the new machine...that may be problematic depending on where the old license camera from....
The new release of w10 allows you to use a windows 7 key to activate..that might work here..not sure if it differentiates between oem keys and retail keys.
Correct. dud2000 is correct also as I meant clean install not update. I have W7 and I read recently that it is easier to do a clean install to W10. However I am thinking the new MB may cause a problem is which I am thinking I should replace the MB prior to doing a clean install.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Jan 2008
L5: Journeyman
969 Posts
136 Reputation
Original Poster
#7
Quote from YanksIn2009 View Post :
Seriously, you would be better off just getting a new machine than trying to upgrade a Core 2 Duo. You can get a cheap i5 based desktop for under 350-450 dollars, Windows license included. Spending money on a new MB, Ram, HD, processor to try and save the case and power supply is just a complete waste of time and not cost effective imo. My 2 cents.
Not necessarily. First, I have not seen an i5 desktop for $350-$450 but that probably is like you said "cheap". I already compared how much it would cost to get a custom built computer (with that components that I want) vs. doing it myself. It still comes ahead for me to build it myself especially with finding the parts on SD for a great price. Second, I am also replacing the case with a low cost one (maybe $40). The only items that I am saving from my current computer (which was custom built) is the PSU (its a good one not the cheap ones prebuilts use), my storage HD, my optical drive (yes, I'm old school) and the Windows license (which is retail not OEM). So in my case, it cost more to buy a new system than build/upgrade it myself.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#8
You're going to need a new PSU
mobo connectors?
original PSU cables short?


nvm
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
for those that hate spelling mistakes www.walmarts.comCool

bulb save money by checking your insurance every 2 years (and not every 20)

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#9
Quote from mkarias1 View Post :
Correct. dud2000 is correct also as I meant clean install not update. I have W7 and I read recently that it is easier to do a clean install to W10. However I am thinking the new MB may cause a problem is which I am thinking I should replace the MB prior to doing a clean install.
Since you have an oem key it should work fine..just do a clean install after you upgrade parts. Use the media creation tool.
For the record though there are always deals on i5 haswell machines for 300. Often at the dell outlet with business machines that are well built and three year next business day warranties.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#10
Quote :
However I am thinking the new MB may cause a problem is which I am thinking I should replace the MB prior to doing a clean install.
can you explain this part?
in a nutshell, you are building a new computer, if board does not have W10 drivers it could be a problem. if you are keeping case and PSU -> you have full rebuild, and it you have 3-4 years old PSU you better buy a new one. I am not sure about your question, looks like you have a brand new build and you have to replace all items at the same time.
ones you replace your mobo, old pc is dead. it is possible to make it work, but clean install faster.
if you want to replace mobo on windows 7 -> full backup + sysprep.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#11
Quote from mkarias1 View Post :
Not necessarily. First, I have not seen an i5 desktop for $350-$450 but that probably is like you said "cheap". I already compared how much it would cost to get a custom built computer (with that components that I want) vs. doing it myself. It still comes ahead for me to build it myself especially with finding the parts on SD for a great price. Second, I am also replacing the case with a low cost one (maybe $40). The only items that I am saving from my current computer (which was custom built) is the PSU (its a good one not the cheap ones prebuilts use), my storage HD, my optical drive (yes, I'm old school) and the Windows license (which is retail not OEM). So in my case, it cost more to buy a new system than build/upgrade it myself.

You can often find i5s for $300 when on sale. 350-450 is no problem. Again depends on the version of the chip and other components of the build, but a solid machine in the $300 area is definitely do-able.

This looks more like the ever popular build vs. buy debate. And while always a subject of great debate here, the bottom line is that unless you are a high end gamer looking for cutting edge or near cutting edge performance (in which case you are spending a lot more than a few hundred dollars), building is almost NEVER cost effective imo esp if you factor in one's time as a cost and the fact that a bought PC comes pre-tested\burned-in and with a warranty. Even if you managed to save 50 dollars on a build, it is not worth the trouble and time and often building will cost you more.

The days where one could compete with the Dells of this world and build cheaper PCs then them are long since gone. Unless you have some specialty need, you are almost always better off buying a good base model and changing out the parts that you wish to upgrade. For example, the i7 based Dell XPS 8700 from the Dell Outlet is often mentioned as a go to machine in this regard. Switch out the graphics board and the PSU and you have a very nice machine at a very good price point (when you get it from the Outlet with the right coupon code in play).
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#12
I got a refurbished dell i7-2600 for $under 200 when they had the 50% code
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Feb 2004
L10: Grand Master
6,950 Posts
944 Reputation
#13
Quote from mkarias1 View Post :
I am upgrading my primitive computer (Intel Core 2 Duo E7200; 4GB RAM; XFX HD6870; W7). I am upgrading the CPU, motherboard, RAM, swapping HD for SSD and upgrading to Windows 10 (clean install). My question is what is the proper steps to upgrade. I assume I cannot do everything at once since a SSD is replacing the HD and also Windows will fail (activation) as it thinks its a new computer (which it is). So what should I do first, second, etc.?

I do not know if these are the right steps or if I am doing more work than needed:

1) Clone HD to SSD. 2) Replace CPU, MB & RAM. 3) Upgrade to Windows 10.

Thanks.
Where did your Win7 license come from?
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Marshall: Have the rest of you guys figured out by now that mmathis is the smartest guy on SlickDeals?
Joined May 2004
L42: The Ultimate Answer
1,440 Posts
993 Reputation
#14
Just do a fresh Win 7 install on the new build, then upgrade to Win 10 and perform a reset.

It might (but probably won't) make you call Microsoft to activate the Win 7 install. A retail license should activate three times before having to call in.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0

Joined Jan 2008
L5: Journeyman
969 Posts
136 Reputation
Original Poster
#15
Quote from mmathis View Post :
Where did your Win7 license come from?
I bought W7 retail version (not OEM) - I think Newegg.
Reply Helpful Comment? 1 0
Page 1 of 1
1
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard