Forum Thread

Can't upgrade to Win 10 due to incompatible graphics adapter even after replacing with compatible one. arrrrrrgh

carmen617 778 466 December 11, 2015 at 06:46 PM
Frustrated here, can't find an easy answer so hoping someone here has encountered this and can save me hours of trial and error. Have a desktop that had an older NVidia graphics adapter incompatible with Windows 10 so it wouldn't install. So bought a new graphics card that is compatible, but when I try to upgrade to Win 10 it tells me i can't cuz of the older adapter that is no longer in the system.

Have tried clearing temp files and rolling back to before I initially tried the upgrade, neither has worked. How do I clear the old incompatibility and go forward here?

15 Comments

1 2

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

Joined Jun 2005
Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
5,848 Posts
2,388 Reputation
#2
is the nvidia on the motherboard or an add in card?

You could try revo uninstaller and make sure you don't have any utilities left over from the card as well as any services.

http://www.revouninstaller.com/re...nload.html
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Apr 2010
L5: Journeyman
778 Posts
466 Reputation
Original Poster
#3
Quote from komondor View Post :
is the nvidia on the motherboard or an add in card?

You could try revo uninstaller and make sure you don't have any utilities left over from the card as well as any services.

http://www.revouninstaller.com/re...nload.html
It's a standalone card, required as the owner runs two monitors. No drivers are left that I can see, I replaced it with an Asus 210. The problem seems to be that the Windows 10 upgrade runs a readiness tool and keeps the results somewhere, referring to those rather than running the tool again when I ask for a new upgrade. So it's still showing the old graphics adapter and not even checking for a new one. I need to know how to clear the old results and make it check again.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Jun 2005
Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
5,848 Posts
2,388 Reputation
#4
run system restore to before you ran the readiness tool replace video card then run the update tool

or the informtion here may help
http://itwaffle.com/2015/08/04/to...-messages/

this has info on which updates to remove to get it to rerun

http://betanews.com/2015/09/11/re...ndows-8-x/
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Apr 2010
L5: Journeyman
778 Posts
466 Reputation
Original Poster
#5
Thanks for suggestions. Couldn't run system restore as was combining this upgrade with a cloned SSD installation and no restore points available. Found the solution, have to force the system to re-run the readiness tool by running this command in an elevated cmd prompt:

schtasks.exe /Run /TN "\Microsoft\Windows\Application Experience\Microsoft Compatibility Appraiser"

and then changing the system date to a date in the future. Then, wait 15 minutes or so, and Windows wants to put 10 on there again.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Aug 2008
L99: Slicker than Ice
6,393 Posts
1,756 Reputation
#6
just do a clean install...
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#7
You can try GWX Control Panel [ultimateoutsider.com]. Check it out.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by dale_101798 December 14, 2015 at 05:11 PM
Earth 1st! We'll mine the other planets later. Biker

Did you know?

If it can't be grown its gotta be mined
EEK!

The best meal I ever ate was Spotted Owl fried in Exxon Oil! Yumshake head

Expand your horizons. Explore something new. Get a RasberryPi and learn something.
Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
12,661 Posts
4,824 Reputation
Pro
#8
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
You can try GWX Control Panel [ultimateoutsider.com]. Check it out.

I checked, it's legal and ethical too.
GWX is a legit program, but it won't help the user install to W10.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Vague questions receive vague answers . . . . . .

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

#9
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
GWX is a legit program, but it won't help the user install to W10.
Indeed but it will remove any evidence that a previous install/upgrade attempt happened.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Apr 2010
L5: Journeyman
778 Posts
466 Reputation
Original Poster
#10
Quote from slapshot136 View Post :
just do a clean install...
Not to get into an argument with you at all, but one of my pet peeves is the advice given to so many people to "just do a clean install" or "format and reinstall" with no thought given to the ramifications of the time involved both ensuring everything is backed up (nothing missed, are you sure? where's your Outlook PST stored? Did you back up the Chrome bookmarks?), reinstalling all software (do you know where all your disks are? your license keys? what about that software you bought and then downloaded, can you find the email with the link, does the link still work, will they allow you to download it again?) Format and reinstall, or clean install, is a LOT more work than an in place upgrade.

In this case I was working with a client's computer who wants it back the way it was given to me, except with an SSD instead of his spinner, a new graphics adapter that works with Windows 10, and the "free" Windows 10 upgrade Microsoft offered him. This should be a fairly simple job - clone the disk, install it and the graphics card, do a Windows 10 upgrade, tweak some settings and makes sure everything still works.

Unfortunately, Microsoft decided to throw a small stick in the works by not re-running their compatibility tool, instead just spitting out the results from the original run. I posted here on the chance someone else had seen this problem and could offer the solution faster than I could find it searching for myself. That wasn't the case, but it could have been. However, "just do a clean install" was for sure NOT the answer.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#11
Quote from carmen617 View Post :
In this case I was working with a client's computer who wants it back the way it was given to me, except with an SSD instead of his spinner, a new graphics adapter that works with Windows 10, and the "free" Windows 10 upgrade Microsoft offered him. This should be a fairly simple job - clone the disk, install it and the graphics card, do a Windows 10 upgrade, tweak some settings and makes sure everything still works.
Just because Microsoft says all your programs will work fine doesn't necessarily mean that's the case. I haven't upgraded to Windows 10, but I have a legacy app on my W7 machine that I know won't work on W8 the W10 upgrade adviser claims it will work, but given how hard it was to make it work in W7 i'm extremely skeptical.

You might try creating a W10 installation DVD or Flash Drive: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/so.../windows10
I think you can still do an upgrade that way. If the computer has integrated graphics, you could also remove the video card entirely until after the upgrade.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Apr 2010
L5: Journeyman
778 Posts
466 Reputation
Original Poster
#12
Quote from jkee View Post :
Just because Microsoft says all your programs will work fine doesn't necessarily mean that's the case. I haven't upgraded to Windows 10, but I have a legacy app on my W7 machine that I know won't work on W8 the W10 upgrade adviser claims it will work, but given how hard it was to make it work in W7 i'm extremely skeptical.

You might try creating a W10 installation DVD or Flash Drive: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/so.../windows10
I think you can still do an upgrade that way. If the computer has integrated graphics, you could also remove the video card entirely until after the upgrade.
It wasn't a matter of the current upgrade not working. I have the upgrade on flash drive and on disk. This issue was different.

What happens when you try to upgrade is that a compatibility tool generates a report that says you are, or are not, compatible. Microsoft, in their infinite wisdom, doesn't have the tool run again on subsequent upgrade attempts. It just looks for any report that's already been generated and, if it says the system has a problem, the upgrade just won't run, regardless of the source. What I needed to do was to force the compatibility tool to run again, which is not an obvious procedure.

As far as your situation is concerned, if you want to test the upgrade and see if it works it's a simple matter to create a system image of your computer as it is. Try the upgrade, see if things work, if they don't roll back to the system image.

I've done about 50 Windows 10 upgrades for clients thus far, this was my first time I hit a Windows generated compatibility issue. However, I have rolled back the upgrade about 5 times due to systems that didn't work well enough after upgrade, for one reason or another. Generally they were older systems to begin with - Microsoft is pushing the upgrade at everybody with Windows 7, on a lot of systems that shouldn't be upgraded. if someone comes to me and says they want Windows 10 I'll give it a shot. If it doesn't work, I roll it back and tell them to live with what they have until they replace the system. Regardless I would never upgrade without a good system image in place to fall back on, and certainly would recommend you do the same!
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Aug 2008
L99: Slicker than Ice
6,393 Posts
1,756 Reputation
#13
Quote from carmen617 View Post :
no thought given to the ramifications of the time involved both ensuring everything is backed up (nothing missed, are you sure? where's your Outlook PST stored? Did you back up the Chrome bookmarks?), reinstalling all software (do you know where all your disks are? your license keys? what about that software you bought and then downloaded, can you find the email with the link, does the link still work, will they allow you to download it again?) Format and reinstall, or clean install, is a LOT more work than an in place upgrade.
most of that stuff is stuff you should already have, or be easy to do - back-up everything? just take an image of the entire drive - license keys? those should be stored somewhere, not hidden in some sort of e-mail link that may or may not be expired - regardless, the point is you are likely going to be spending more hours attempting to force this upgrade to go through and fixing stuff that doesn't work afterwards
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#14
Quote from carmen617 View Post :
What happens when you try to upgrade is that a compatibility tool generates a report that says you are, or are not, compatible. Microsoft, in their infinite wisdom, doesn't have the tool run again on subsequent upgrade attempts.
I was thinking it might only throw a flag about that if you initiate the upgrade from within the current windows install and that if you boot of installation media it might at least re-run the check. But you've already fixed it anyway.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Apr 2010
L5: Journeyman
778 Posts
466 Reputation
Original Poster
#15
Quote from slapshot136 View Post :
most of that stuff is stuff you should already have, or be easy to do - back-up everything? just take an image of the entire drive - license keys? those should be stored somewhere, not hidden in some sort of e-mail link that may or may not be expired - regardless, the point is you are likely going to be spending more hours attempting to force this upgrade to go through and fixing stuff that doesn't work afterwards
If your backup is a system image (which mine is, btw) then you are not doing a clean install. A clean install presumes reinstalling Windows and then installing fresh copies of all your drivers and software, then putting your data back where it belongs. A system image as a backup presumes all is well to begin with, and you just want to be able to return to that "all is well" spot.

Having done many in place upgrades as well as many "clean installs" I can tell you unequivocally it's a lot easier to just upgrade in place and test things to see if they work. Is it cleaner? Nope, clean install is cleaner. The difference is like the one between remodeling the kitchen vs. tearing down the house and building a new one.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 1 of 2
1 2
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard