Forum Thread

Please help me with RAID 1 mirroring issue

hanime 656 144 January 11, 2016 at 08:08 PM
I got an issue with using a new drive in an existing RAID 1 configuration. I am trying to mirror drive E onto the new drive D in Windows 10 via Disk Management. I am getting the All disks holding extents for a given volume must have the same sector size, and the sector size must be valid error. Both are 5TB WD blue drives. It's very odd. Drive E has 4648.88GB while Drive D has 4657.37GB. I read up on physical sector size, but don't know how to fix/get RAID 1 to work. Any ideas how to fix?

Code:
C:\Windows\system32>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo e:
NTFS Volume Serial Number :        xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
NTFS Version   :                   3.1
LFS Version    :                   2.0
Number Sectors :                   0x0000000048a37efa
Total Clusters :                   0x0000000048a37efa
Free Clusters  :                   0x0000000014276237
Total Reserved :                   0x0000000000000000
Bytes Per Sector  :                4096
Bytes Per Physical Sector :        4096
Bytes Per Cluster :                4096
Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    :  4096
Clusters Per FileRecord Segment :  1
Mft Valid Data Length :            0x0000000031400000
Mft Start Lcn  :                   0x00000000000c0000
Mft2 Start Lcn :                   0x0000000000000002
Mft Zone Start :                   0x000000001d69b460
Mft Zone End   :                   0x000000001d69c0c0
Max Device Trim Extent Count :     4294967295
Max Device Trim Byte Count :       0xffffffff
Max Volume Trim Extent Count :     62
Max Volume Trim Byte Count :       0xffffffff
Resource Manager Identifier :     4A072CC7-9BF1-11E5-9BDD-001FBC11AD24

C:\Windows\system32>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo d:
NTFS Volume Serial Number :        xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
NTFS Version   :                   3.1
LFS Version    :                   2.0
Number Sectors :                   0x00000002462bcfff
Total Clusters :                   0x0000000048c579ff
Free Clusters  :                   0x0000000048c438ba
Total Reserved :                   0x0000000000000000
Bytes Per Sector  :                512
Bytes Per Physical Sector :        512
Bytes Per Cluster :                4096
Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    :  1024
Clusters Per FileRecord Segment :  0
Mft Valid Data Length :            0x0000000000040000
Mft Start Lcn  :                   0x00000000000c0000
Mft2 Start Lcn :                   0x0000000000000002
Mft Zone Start :                   0x00000000000c0000
Mft Zone End   :                   0x00000000000cc820
Max Device Trim Extent Count :     0
Max Device Trim Byte Count :       0x0
Max Volume Trim Extent Count :     62
Max Volume Trim Byte Count :       0x40000000
Resource Manager Identifier :     56A623DA-B8D3-11E5-9BE6-001FBC11AD24

9 Comments

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#2
Quote from hanime View Post :
I got an issue with using a new drive in an existing RAID 1 configuration. I am trying to mirror drive E onto the new drive D in Windows 10 via Disk Management. I am getting the All disks holding extents for a given volume must have the same sector size, and the sector size must be valid error. Both are 5TB WD blue drives. It's very odd. Drive E has 4648.88GB while Drive D has 4657.37GB. I read up on physical sector size, but don't know how to fix/get RAID 1 to work. Any ideas how to fix?
I would just like to say that I have never trusted a software raid array. I would recommend buying 2 Promise raid cards [amazon.com], one for immediate use and the 2nd one for raid repair if the 1st card goes south.

If your drive E was larger than your drive D the software raid should detect that and automatically subtract disk space from the larger capacity drive but according to your description I think that in your case you have a working raid array and because your new drive has less available space it just can't be made to work unless you use sophisticated disk management utilities to resize your existing raid 1 array.

I hope this helps & I really hope I understood your question correctly.
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Last edited by dale_101798 January 11, 2016 at 09:59 PM
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#3
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
I would just like to say that I have never trusted a software raid array. I would recommend buying 2 Promise raid cards [amazon.com], one for immediate use and the 2nd one for raid repair if the 1st card goes south.

If your drive E was larger than your drive D the software raid should detect that and automatically subtract disk space from the larger capacity drive but according to your description I think that in your case you have a working raid array and because your new drive has less available space it just can't be made to work unless you use sophisticated disk management utilities to resize your existing raid 1 array.

I hope this helps & I really hope I understood your question correctly.
Thanks--those raid cards do sound very promising. I might have to do that if nothing else.

From what I read, for some RAID configurations with software, it does not matter about the capacity; the lower of the two will be the determining factor of the usable capacity, etc. I think Windows is just pretty strict about the difference in 4096 and 512 bytes physical sector sizes between the drives. Been reading up, and it's not looking good for me. I have to get matching drives (bytes per physical sector sizes). :[
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#4
Quote from hanime View Post :
I have to get matching drives (bytes per physical sector sizes). :
You should be able to re-label one. Don't ask me how in windows but the disk geometry is not set in stone.
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#5
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
I would just like to say that I have never trusted a software raid array. I would recommend buying 2 Promise raid cards [amazon.com], one for immediate use and the 2nd one for raid repair if the 1st card goes south.

If your drive E was larger than your drive D the software raid should detect that and automatically subtract disk space from the larger capacity drive but according to your description I think that in your case you have a working raid array and because your new drive has less available space it just can't be made to work unless you use sophisticated disk management utilities to resize your existing raid 1 array.

I hope this helps & I really hope I understood your question correctly.
On the flip side, I've never trusted a hardware raid board. Unless you're buying quality enterprise hardware, you'd be hard pressed to find something as well tested and broadly supported as Windows software raid. You also have the advantage of being decoupled from hardware of you need to move the drive to a different system.

Edit: missed the bit about sector sizes. Tough break. I don't have any specific advice on that.
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#6
Quote from vivahate View Post :
You should be able to re-label one. Don't ask me how in windows but the disk geometry is not set in stone.
Interesting. From what I read, the physical sector sizes cannot be changed though. Was that misinformation from other sources?
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#7
FWIW, if you've got an extra 5tb drive and can't use it in RAID, you might want to look at incremental backup as an alternative. You lose the instant recovery of raid, but you get checkpointing which can be pretty useful if you accidentally corrupt or delete something.

Software to look at would include Acronis true image which shows up FAR here every month or so or Veeam endpoint backup, which is free but not as full featured.
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#8
I got this resolved. In any case similar to mine where you have Drive A & B, and then B needs to be replaced with C, there might be a way to keep data in A intact while mirroring it to C. But instead, I backed up A, removed RAID 1 between A & B, formatted A & C (NTFS default), then set up a new RAID 1 for A & C. For some reason, the physical sector sizes don't appear to matter anymore. I ran the fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo for each and they are matching with 4K physical sector size. They can be changed!
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#9
Grats & worship

Thanks the detailed explanation of your solution.
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#10
Quote from hanime View Post :
Interesting. From what I read, the physical sector sizes cannot be changed though. Was that misinformation from other sources?
I see you got it fixed but TBH, I don't know whether the sectors are physically changed or just emulating a change but the bottom line is the system sees them as changed.

At work we used to have to do this fairly regularly to "trick" Seagate drives into being Western Digital and so on (but we were using Solaris)
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