Forum Thread

APC Back-Up ES 500

Mack7mle 575 146 January 14, 2016 at 02:37 PM
I got my hands on a older ups, I plugged it in and got a constant beeping sound when I did. The issue seemed to be that battery needed to be replaced. I bought a new battery for it, plugged it and the sound was gone. I did leave it plugged in to give the new battery a charge before using it. I gave it a good day for it to charge then I unplugged it and put it away for a while (why I didn't begin to use it immediately? I don't know).

I decided yesterday to use it and to my surprise the outlets on the battery back-up side do not work. It seem the battery still had a charge to it, it powered on while not being plugged in, but I decided to let it charge overnight in hopes that would fix it. I tried to use it today but it's still given me the same problem. There are no beeps or "faulty wiring" lights. I do hear a click then another click about 5 seconds later when I plug it in. I can't tell if the "breaker reset" button is working,I'm use to breaker buttons being harder to press in than what is on the ups.

My question is should give up on it and just buy another or can it still be fixed?

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#2
i have a couple of the older apc ups 500. if the back up outlets dont work when the unit is plugged in or unplugged on battery then something internal is messed up. its possible the unit took a major power surge or lightening strike surge before you got your hands on it. in my previous research i read that some of the older apc ups units will fail due to the capacitors aging and failing. the reset button on the back will have a soft feel when you push it when its not tripped and a harder push when it is tripped. the initial clicking when you first plug it in is the unit doing a self test and testing the battery to see if it needs charging, as for the battery its bad to let them sit for extended periods of time unused/unplugged as they will develop crystals and eventually fail.
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Last edited by ReverseHandedJO January 14, 2016 at 03:51 PM
#3
1st of all you follow these steps at your own risk. I am only describing what I would do. You may not have the experience needed to be safe following this diagnostic series of tests.

Open it up, disconnect the battery terminals [both of them]. Inspect everything. You want to look for a dry crusty yucky stuff. Don't touch it if you find it, it's acid. Carefully use backing soda to clean it up if its found. Do not allow baking soda residue to remain, clean it up too. The baking soda will neutralize the acid.

I agree you should look for bulging capacitors and you should also check the bottoms, I have seen them pop right next to the circuit board too. Generally speaking you can safely replace them if you 1st short the contacts out to each other. Capacitors store electricity and the stored charge can be significant and painful.

Somewhere on the circuit board there will be a fuse. Test it with a volt/ohm meter a visual inspection is not good enough.

If the fuse is good & everything else seems 'normal' you can leave the battery unconnected and plug in the UPS. You should hear an alarm. The alarm indicates that the battery is bad. No alarm? Oops this just got complicated.EEK!

If you heard the alarm, unplug the UPS and reconnect the battery be cautious of polarity. Plug in the UPS and turn it on. No Alarm, things are looking up Smilie

Plug something not very important but at least 100 watts but less than 500 watts in this case into the UPS battery protected side and note if it works, Yes = goodRoll Eyes (Sarcastic) Disconnect the AC supply to the UPS, there should be an alarm.

Reconnect the AC supply. Now plug the electrical device into an unprotected outlet, if it works = good and in my opinion you can start using it.

If you get a failure anywhere in the above diagnostic steps I do not recommend you try to diagnose the problem any further. It would cost you more to pay someone to fix it than it is worth.
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#4
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
1st of all you follow these steps at your own risk. I am only describing what I would do. You may not have the experience needed to be safe following this diagnostic series of tests.

Open it up, disconnect the battery terminals [both of them]. Inspect everything. You want to look for a dry crusty yucky stuff. Don't touch it if you find it, it's acid. Carefully use backing soda to clean it up if its found. Do not allow baking soda residue to remain, clean it up too. The baking soda will neutralize the acid.

I agree you should look for bulging capacitors and you should also check the bottoms, I have seen them pop right next to the circuit board too. Generally speaking you can safely replace them if you 1st short the contacts out to each other. Capacitors store electricity and the stored charge can be significant and painful.

Somewhere on the circuit board there will be a fuse. Test it with a volt/ohm meter a visual inspection is not good enough.

If the fuse is good & everything else seems 'normal' you can leave the battery unconnected and plug in the UPS. You should hear an alarm. The alarm indicates that the battery is bad. No alarm? Oops this just got complicated.EEK!

If you heard the alarm, unplug the UPS and reconnect the battery be cautious of polarity. Plug in the UPS and turn it on. No Alarm, things are looking up Smilie

Plug something not very important but at least 100 watts but less than 500 watts in this case into the UPS battery protected side and note if it works, Yes = goodRoll Eyes (Sarcastic) Disconnect the AC supply to the UPS, there should be an alarm.

Reconnect the AC supply. Now plug the electrical device into an unprotected outlet, if it works = good and in my opinion you can start using it.

If you get a failure anywhere in the above diagnostic steps I do not recommend you try to diagnose the problem any further. It would cost you more to pay someone to fix it than it is worth.
I cracked it open, after disconnecting the battery, and besides the dust I didn't see any bulging capacitors but I note that there were two push on terminals not connected......coincidentally it was on the side with the battery back-up outlets. I hooked the connectors back up and the plugs seem to be working again.

I appreciate the help....I almost removed the battery and got rid of it.
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#5
Quote from Mack7mle View Post :
I appreciate the help....I almost removed the battery and got rid of it.
You are welcome. Thanks for the update.heart
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