Forum Thread

Can you recommend a PoE/camera "bundle"

Dr. J 25,043 3,353 February 4, 2016 at 03:22 PM
I've run cat6 to various locations in the house and am ready to do PoE cameras in several places. I have some Foscam 8910W's that have worked OK but I want to ditch the (power) wires, in addition to putting a few cams outside (under eaves).

So do I pick any "PoE standard" camera and any PoE switch and I'm good to go?

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#2
We went to Costco today, there was a new product on display. It was a 4 camera security system [costco.com]. Maybe it will do the job for you.

You could still use the Foscam cameras if you used Cisco [cisco power over ethernet injector] or even built power injectors [bing.com].
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Last edited by dale_101798 February 4, 2016 at 05:49 PM
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#3
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
So do I pick any "PoE standard" camera and any PoE switch and I'm good to go?
If you're using proper PoE devices that support 802.3af or 802.3at yes anything built for this spec will work. There are some 'passive' PoE devices that don't conform to these standards and I would avoid them if possible.
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#4
Dont pick any camera. You need to do the research to determine what camera is best for the task. What will you be recording to?
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#5
What you want would work, but I would look at complete security systems (PoE based). They give you the unified DVR with network interface and a slew of other nice features. Better than just plunking down a camera and having to individually monitor each one. The quality determiner in the camera is the ability to read a license plate. Not all "HD" cameras are created equal. If you are looking for night vision capability, definitely get a few infrared illuminators to greatly increase the range of those cameras.
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#6
The existing Foscam cameras will not need PoE. I've determined that it really isn't worth trying to do PoE with the Foscams; whatever exists will still be hardwired (power).

I haven't really decided to make this a "Recording" system; right now I just like the ability to check in remotely (tinycam).
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#7
one option for 'recording' is a dedicated gmail account and emailing pictures on motion. Some cameras have built in micro sd slots.
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#8
I can recommend Ubiquiti products. They have a NVR and camera solution.

The NVR runs about $325
A 3pack of POE cams run about $350.
Right around $675 for 3 decent cameras and a NVR station. You also do not need a NVR appliance with this solution -- a Windows or Linux computer works as well with the NVR software.

Just like any solution there are downsides. The NVR only accepts Ubnt cams so you can't mix and match other brands in there. You can use the cams on other software if you desire but they really do work best with the NVR controller.

I didn't see a project budget or scope in your OP.
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#9
Quote from eekthecat View Post :
I can recommend Ubiquiti products. They have a NVR and camera solution.

The NVR runs about $325
A 3pack of POE cams run about $350.
Right around $675 for 3 decent cameras and a NVR station. You also do not need a NVR appliance with this solution -- a Windows or Linux computer works as well with the NVR software.

Just like any solution there are downsides. The NVR only accepts Ubnt cams so you can't mix and match other brands in there. You can use the cams on other software if you desire but they really do work best with the NVR controller.

I didn't see a project budget or scope in your OP.
Ubiquiti makes good wifi products but their cameras are WAY overpriced. 115 for a 720p with a 1/4 inch sensor bullet camera? who are they kidding. For a while they tried disabling rtsp feeds so you could not use the cameras with third party software. They only returned the capability after lots of outrage and complaints.
You cant use a standard poe switch with their cameras either, they have their own 24v passive poe setup.
They are not onvif compliant either.
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#10
Quote from fenderman View Post :
Ubiquiti makes good wifi products but their cameras are WAY overpriced. 115 for a 720p with a 1/4 inch sensor bullet camera? who are they kidding. For a while they tried disabling rtsp feeds so you could not use the cameras with third party software. They only returned the capability after lots of outrage and complaints.
You cant use a standard poe switch with their cameras either, they have their own 24v passive poe setup.
They are not onvif compliant either.
Most people don't actually use the RTSP or ONVIF stuff. If you were wanting to use these cameras on different platforms I'd agree that this would be a negative but rarely would I put that as such for a typical consumer only.

The pricing isn't really all that bad. It could be a little cheaper -- but the usability of the interface usually smokes those pre-packed outfits pretty handily.

Also the POE is only a concern if you are setting up a large system or mixing in with an existing setup. For both scenarios, Ubiquiti is not for you.

As a tech person I understand the complaints, but they are really very moot to a consumer of a small system. You'd be really surprised how intuitive the interface and mobile app is compared to most other systems. The cost is slightly higher than I'd like but really pretty close to par. The one sticking point that helps some people is the fact that the NVR doesn't have to be an appliance and can run on any computer. A lot of people already have a computer running 24/7 that can handle this or they repurpose a computer for this saving them a lot of money. At that rate, a 3 camera NVR setup for $350 is hard to complain about.

Ubiquiti is not for everyone and it shouldn't be pushed as such. It also shouldn't be discounted across the board for points that may or may not matter to the consumer.

Just clarifying some of the critique to put in perspective of a consumer. Thanks!
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Last edited by eekthecat February 7, 2016 at 07:37 AM
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#11
Quote from eekthecat View Post :
Most people don't actually use the RTSP or ONVIF stuff. If you were wanting to use these cameras on different platforms I'd agree that this would be a negative but rarely would I put that as such for a typical consumer only.

The pricing isn't really all that bad. It could be a little cheaper -- but the usability of the interface usually smokes those pre-packed outfits pretty handily.

Also the POE is only a concern if you are setting up a large system or mixing in with an existing setup. For both scenarios, Ubiquiti is not for you.

As a tech person I understand the complaints, but they are really very moot to a consumer of a small system. You'd be really surprised how intuitive the interface and mobile app is compared to most other systems. The cost is slightly higher than I'd like but really pretty close to par. The one sticking point that helps some people is the fact that the NVR doesn't have to be an appliance and can run on any computer. A lot of people already have a computer running 24/7 that can handle this or they repurpose a computer for this saving them a lot of money. At that rate, a 3 camera NVR setup for $350 is hard to complain about.

Ubiquiti is not for everyone and it shouldn't be pushed as such. It also shouldn't be discounted across the board for points that may or may not matter to the consumer.

Just clarifying some of the critique to put in perspective of a consumer. Thanks!
I hate proprietary stuff. And the cameras are not only overpriced, they are VERY overpriced. I see no benefit to this at all - in fact, even for free, it would be a hindrance since upgrades to the system would also be proprietary. Why did you suggest it? Do you have it?
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#12
I'm definitely more interested in IPCAMS over some proprietary stuff. I need remote access to these. Essentially something similar to my Foscams but better quality and designed to run PoE natively.
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#13
Quote from eekthecat View Post :
Most people don't actually use the RTSP or ONVIF stuff. If you were wanting to use these cameras on different platforms I'd agree that this would be a negative but rarely would I put that as such for a typical consumer only.

The pricing isn't really all that bad. It could be a little cheaper -- but the usability of the interface usually smokes those pre-packed outfits pretty handily.

Also the POE is only a concern if you are setting up a large system or mixing in with an existing setup. For both scenarios, Ubiquiti is not for you.

As a tech person I understand the complaints, but they are really very moot to a consumer of a small system. You'd be really surprised how intuitive the interface and mobile app is compared to most other systems. The cost is slightly higher than I'd like but really pretty close to par. The one sticking point that helps some people is the fact that the NVR doesn't have to be an appliance and can run on any computer. A lot of people already have a computer running 24/7 that can handle this or they repurpose a computer for this saving them a lot of money. At that rate, a 3 camera NVR setup for $350 is hard to complain about.

Ubiquiti is not for everyone and it shouldn't be pushed as such. It also shouldn't be discounted across the board for points that may or may not matter to the consumer.

Just clarifying some of the critique to put in perspective of a consumer. Thanks!
1) Anyone who plans to use these cameras with third party software NEEDS rtsp or onvif. If you dont like the NVR or their software you would have a paper weight.
2) For the reasons above poe is important otherwise if you choose not to use their nvr, you would need a non standard poe switch. Running separate power when you already have ethernet there is insane.
3) There are MUCH better options than 115 per camera. For example you can get US region hikvision 2mp cameras with warranty for that price.
4) anyone selling proprietary gear overpriced at 720p and 1/4 sensor, with basically only a bullet camera option (the in ceiling option is not feasible in most cases), should not even be considered.

Quote from Dr. J View Post :
I'm definitely more interested in IPCAMS over some proprietary stuff. I need remote access to these. Essentially something similar to my Foscams but better quality and designed to run PoE natively.
Check out ipcamtalk.com
Lots of info there.
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Last edited by fenderman February 7, 2016 at 01:53 PM
#14
Quote from dealgate View Post :
I hate proprietary stuff. And the cameras are not only overpriced, they are VERY overpriced. I see no benefit to this at all - in fact, even for free, it would be a hindrance since upgrades to the system would also be proprietary. Why did you suggest it? Do you have it?
I've done hundreds of thousands of dollars in installations. Almost all of which is in proprietary enterprise class systems. Proprietary is not the devil -- most consumers don't waver between systems back and forth like a lot of tech people do. If you are a tech person, UIbiquiti may or may not suit your needs. I have also installed dozens of Ubiquiti for personal use and they work very well. I've used Blue Iris, Zoneminder, Honeywell, Axis, Hikvision, Swann, Lorex, Foscam (yuck), and about a dozen others.

I think it should be reiterated as maybe some on this thread don't clearly understand. If you are a techy person you probably like trying new systems or doing fairly standard thing like rtsp or onvif hooks into the cams. You will not see that type of usage or vendor swap from a non-technical consumer. They want a system that works and that is the end of it.

I even prefaced my suggestion with that notion. It's a very poor understanding that requires one to jump on the notion when they have moot points against the system. The $115 is not vastly different or greater than Hikvision cameras. I also believe you give non-technical consumers way too much credit on trying to maximize every tech spec to their max (talking to fenderman here).

Also, you can get rtsp on Ubuquiti and I HAVE used them on other systems so your points are really moot and factually incorrect.

Also, fenderman, the NVR is not the POE power source, the cameras come with power injectors and you may certainly ditch the NVR and retain POE operation with these cameras. It helps to know some facts about the system you are negating as an option if you are pushing a one-sided and closed agenda.

It was just a suggestion, and there are many happy people running Ubquiti security platforms. It is an extremely easy to use interface for non-technical people. The lock-in isn't so severe you have no flexibility and the pricing is in line with other systems.

There are CERTAINLY better cameras. I never touted this as the best option but it is AN option that one could consider. I think these forums lend themselves to people wanting to jump in and say "I'm MORE correct" rather than discuss the options one might have.

Every solution has an application. Give each one a fair shake if it is relevant. Ubiquiti is certainly relevant for this discussion and I certainly won't push this solution on anyone but felt it was an appropriate option and I stand by that.
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#15
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
I'm definitely more interested in IPCAMS over some proprietary stuff. I need remote access to these. Essentially something similar to my Foscams but better quality and designed to run PoE natively.
IPCAMS and proprietary and not exclusive. The others in this thread are just ripping a suggestion that they don't really know much about. The option is up to you. Btw, all these cameras are proprietary so I'm not exactly sure what their agenda against it is.

I think it would be a bit more clear if you wanted an out-of-box experience or you wanted to piece a system together.

Do you want decent quality recordings or do you desire to have the latest resolution and quality?

Is your goal anything other than just recording and able to view this on any computer or mobile phone?

Do you have a particular budget in mind?

Do you have a computer that you leave running 24/7 that you would like to use as the recorder or would you prefer to spend the money on a standalone recording appliance?
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