Forum Thread

Wiring my house, and I want your input

LiquidRetro 12,661 4,824 February 14, 2016 at 02:41 PM
I am in the advanced planning stages of wiring my home for networking. I am doing this for speed and reliability. My town is in the process of a city wide fiber build out so I figured I might as well be ready. Turns out I am just basically a block outside the 2016 build zone Frown but it’s time to wire up anyways. My home is about 1650 sq ft ranch. The basement is about ½ finished. In the diagram below the white is unfinished space.

I have experience running and terminating Cat5 at the office but this will be my first time in residential existing construction and Cat6. I do have an electrician friend who has quite a bit of experience who is going to help me out. The previous homeowner ran some speaker wire all over, and I might be able to reuse some of these boxes/use the wire as a pull. That will kind of bea game time decision.

I fired up Sketchup and drew out a rough floor plan of my home, labled some rooms and put yellow yellow circles where I am roughly thinking of putting boxes at for networking. Most of this I can go through the attic and drop down into the interior walls. I have a few exterior walls to deal with though, and a few I will probably come up from the bottom.

Main Floor Photo http://i.imgur.com/PtsCRxK.jpg
Basement Photo http://i.imgur.com/EXiHwwC.jpg

So I am wondering what you think about my rough plan. My thought is to pull 2 wires to each box. I will probably pull 4 to my Office, maybe the living room too.

Spreadsheet of more details http://i.imgur.com/GPvdpOc.png

My patch panel is where I want the most input. In the past I have put a piece of plywood up on the wall to screw equipment too, a patch panel, etc. This time I am thinking of putting a Piece of Plywood up over the silver area in the photo below.

Panel Location http://i.imgur.com/XsXcNZH.jpg and http://i.imgur.com/AaHOk4h.jpg

This is a air return, thin almost cardboard material. I was thinking of running a new outlet to power things too as it will be a short 25-30ft run, and that way is dedicated power to UPS, Future ONT, etc off of. What I am unsure of is I should get a wall mount half rack and put everything in that. Patch Panel, Switch, Router and have room for a future NAS. I should mention

Thoughts, Comments, ETC?

15 Comments

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#2
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Thoughts, Comments, ETC?
These guides have some good advice on running low voltage wires:
http://pdf.crutchfieldonline.com/...tSpeak.pdf
http://pdf.crutchfieldonline.com/...sSpeak.pdf

This thread has some good info, especially posts 26 & 63 if I do say so myself Stick Out Tongue:
http://slickdeals.net/e/7180838-need-help-on-how-to-wire-new-build-home-with-network-cabling?v=1

I would suggest you make a spreadsheet with all your drop locations, what goes to each location, and the estimated cable length.
  • Exterior walls are a lot harder to do.
  • I would put the office drop on the wall common to the guest bedroom.
  • I'd put probably put the master bedroom drop on the wall common with the master bath or closet.
  • The trick to the kitchen drop is going to be lining up with the walls in the basement.
  • You might want a drop on the wall that divides the kitchen and living room to accommodate alternate furniture arrangements.
  • Router will have better range on first floor, but it may not matter. If you've got 2+ runs to some locations you can make a lan & wan run to a router or add an access point.
  • As to your panel location, don't crowd the duct work (panned in stud bays), electrical and plumbing too much.
  • Based on the direction it looks like your floor joists run, you could probably avoid the attic entirely in most cases (excluding exterior walls), but some of the walls could be right on top of the joists and those would be difficult.

Is the space under the stairs accessible?
An internet connected washing machine? Really?
What year was it built?
Where are your furnace & water heater?
Where is your attic access?
Where is your main breaker panel?
Is there a bathroom in the basement (it looks like there may be a rough in in the area you're thinking about using for your wires)?
Where are cold air returns located on the drawing?

If you want a more traditional CAD program, the free version of DraftSight works very well:
http://www.3ds.com/products-servi...-download/
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Last edited by jkee February 15, 2016 at 05:07 PM
#3
Try to locate with a reasonable degree of precision the floor joists near the walls I marked.
You can use a combination of tape measure, stud finder, and nails in the subfloor of the unfinished part of the basement.
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Last edited by jkee February 14, 2016 at 04:36 PM
#4
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
I am in the advanced planning stages of wiring my home for networking. I am doing this for speed and reliability. My town is in the process of a city wide fiber build out so I figured I might as well be ready. Turns out I am just basically a block outside the 2016 build zone but it's time to wire up anyways. My home is about 1650 sq ft ranch. The basement is about 1/2 finished. In the diagram below the white is unfinished space.

I have experience running and terminating Cat5 at the office but this will be my first time in residential existing construction and Cat6. I do have an electrician friend who has quite a bit of experience who is going to help me out. The previous homeowner ran some speaker wire all over, and I might be able to reuse some of these boxes/use the wire as a pull. That will kind of bea game time decision.

I fired up Sketchup and drew out a rough floor plan of my home, labled some rooms and put yellow yellow circles where I am roughly thinking of putting boxes at for networking. Most of this I can go through the attic and drop down into the interior walls. I have a few exterior walls to deal with though, and a few I will probably come up from the bottom.

Main Floor Photo http://i.imgur.com/PtsCRxK.jpg
Basement Photo http://i.imgur.com/EXiHwwC.jpg

So I am wondering what you think about my rough plan. My thought is to pull 2 wires to each box. I will probably pull 4 to my Office, maybe the living room too.

Spreadsheet of more details http://i.imgur.com/GPvdpOc.png

My patch panel is where I want the most input. In the past I have put a piece of plywood up on the wall to screw equipment too, a patch panel, etc. This time I am thinking of putting a Piece of Plywood up over the silver area in the photo below.

Panel Location http://i.imgur.com/XsXcNZH.jpg and http://i.imgur.com/AaHOk4h.jpg

This is a air return, thin almost cardboard material. I was thinking of running a new outlet to power things too as it will be a short 25-30ft run, and that way is dedicated power to UPS, Future ONT, etc off of. What I am unsure of is I should get a wall mount half rack and put everything in that. Patch Panel, Switch, Router and have room for a future NAS. I should mention

Thoughts, Comments, ETC?
I usually recommend to wire in a closet where you might hide devices such as NAS and stuff. That wall looks like it could possibly be in an open area where you may not want to have shelves or racks of stuff. Even if you do put a bunch of your equipment on that wall in a rack as one might do, you may benefit by running several ports to a secondary location where you could attach several things. Common walls can usually make great double runs for both sides so keep that in mind. Exterior walls are usually really difficult but sometimes you get lucky.

I always recommend at least 2 if not 4 cables at a TV location. With the introduction of every device being networked you benefit from those about the most in your home. I really enjoy having my devices that can be wired on a wired connection. Sometimes it seems like you have a zillion network cables but when you start using the ones you never thought you would, man it feels good. I never run a single cable anywhere unless it is ancillary only, for wall ports I always have two. You'd be surprised how often you find a use for either dual ports for a LAG or a return for something (this is more techy than consumer).

Last suggestion is to run some ancillary cables for odd devices such as remote access points, surveillance cameras, and other such devices.

Enjoy your wired home
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#5
I can't add much to jkee and eekthecat's ideas but I believe the wall mounted rack is something that you will be glad to have installed as time passes it just makes a tidy installation. look around
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#6
Quote from eekthecat View Post :
I usually recommend to wire in a closet where you might hide devices such as NAS and stuff. That wall looks like it could possibly be in an open area where you may not want to have shelves or racks of stuff...

Last suggestion is to run some ancillary cables for odd devices such as remote access points, surveillance cameras, and other such devices.
It might actually work well to run all the wires back to a location closer to the service entrance, it would use a bit more wire. This obviously depends on other obstructions and things like electrical, plumbing, hvac.

If walls I marked don't line right up with joists and there isn't too much duct work / plumbing the the joist bays you'd need this could end up being a pretty easy install for LR. However, it looks like the runs for your TV could end up being some of the most difficult (depending on the accuracy of your drawing and photos).

It's good to plan and think about different ancillary uses, but don't go crazy. This is an existing home that isn't undergoing a major renovation. The difficulty of running these now vs. in the future is about the same. If you plan some future renovation that would restrict future installations, that's a good time to do a few more runs, assuming you plan your runs well. I'd suggest you think of it like a tree with 90 degree branches and a main trunk. You'll want to use something like j-hooks, bridal rings, or something similar for the trunk. A cable tray would be overkill, but to each his own.

Extra cables to the TV are always a good idea. They can get used for other things too like HDBase-T for an HDMI run (may be better with STP cable) or an ir blaster. Some pull strings can also be very useful.

Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
I can't add much to jkee and eekthecat's ideas but I believe the wall mounted rack is something that you will be glad to have installed as time passes it just makes a tidy installation. look around
Racks are certainly nice and good for accommodating other equipment like switches and servers. Wall mount is a good option, but you could also mount one to the concrete floor. While I can understand the appeal of the structured media cabinets, in reality they can be hard to deal with (bigger is better).
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Last edited by jkee February 14, 2016 at 08:27 PM
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#7
do you have a second floor? attic?

If so consider running a large conduit from the basement to the attic to be able to service the 1st/2nd floors from the attic.

I also agree with fashioning a closet of sorts - easier to cordon off and prevent access. In my house when I finished the basement I kept the area under the stairs and enclosed it as a closet - all the network and RG6 shit runs to there, and it's pretty much useless for anything else, so it's not like I am using valuable floor space.
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#8
Quote from jkee View Post :
These guides have some good advice on running low voltage wires:
http://pdf.crutchfieldonline.com/...tSpeak.pdf
http://pdf.crutchfieldonline.com/...sSpeak.pdf

This thread has some good info, especially posts 26 & 63 if I do say so myself Stick Out Tongue:
http://slickdeals.net/e/7180838-need-help-on-how-to-wire-new-build-home-with-network-cabling?v=1

I would suggest you make a spreadsheet with all your drop locations, what goes to each location, and the estimated cable length.
  • Exterior walls are a lot harder to do.
  • I would put the office drop on the wall common to the guest bedroom.
  • I'd put probably put the master bedroom drop on the wall common with the master bath or closet.
  • The trick to the kitchen drop is going to be lining up with the walls in the basement.
  • You might want a drop on the wall that divides the kitchen and living room to accommodate alternate furniture arrangements.
  • Router will have better range on first floor, but it may not matter. If you've got 2+ runs to some locations you can make a lan & wan run to a router or add an access point.
  • As to your panel location, don't crowd the duct work (panned in stud bays), electrical and plumbing too much.
  • Based on the direction it looks like your floor joists run, you could probably avoid the attic entirely in most cases (excluding exterior walls), but some of the walls could be right on top of the joists and those would be difficult.

Is the space under the stairs accessible?
An internet connected washing machine? Really?
What year was it built?
Where are your furnace & water heater?
Where is your attic access?
Where is your main breaker panel?
Is there a bathroom in the basement (it looks like there may be a rough in in the area you're thinking about using for your wires)?
Where are cold air returns located on the drawing?

If you want a more traditional CAD program, the free version of DraftSight works very well:
http://www.3ds.com/products-servi...-download/

Wow good group of links. I'll review that thread for sure. Router is pretty centrally located so wifi has been good, not really worried about that. I can't move the office location much as it's where the how the door works in the room etc.

Yes space under the stairs is accessible, it's kind of the tornado shelter so I like to keep it clean.
I figured as long as I was running wires, might as well put on in the laundry room.
House was built in 1996
HVAC system is in the basement, about 10-15 ft to the right of where I proposed the rack. There is a corner there.
Attic access is in the garage.
Main breaker panel is right next to where all the services come in.
There is a bathroom in the basement, bottom right hand corner in blue. It's small, not used often.
Air returns are not drawn in.

Ya I should redo this drawing with real dimensions but this is close and gives me an idea. I have plenty of cable to get the job done.

Quote from jkee View Post :
Try to locate with a reasonable degree of precision the floor joists near the walls I marked.
You can use a combination of tape measure, stud finder, and nails in the subfloor of the unfinished part of the basement.
Ok ya that will make it easier. I think I can do most bottom up if we decide to do that.

Quote from eekthecat View Post :
I usually recommend to wire in a closet where you might hide devices such as NAS and stuff. That wall looks like it could possibly be in an open area where you may not want to have shelves or racks of stuff. Even if you do put a bunch of your equipment on that wall in a rack as one might do, you may benefit by running several ports to a secondary location where you could attach several things. Common walls can usually make great double runs for both sides so keep that in mind. Exterior walls are usually really difficult but sometimes you get lucky.

I always recommend at least 2 if not 4 cables at a TV location. With the introduction of every device being networked you benefit from those about the most in your home. I really enjoy having my devices that can be wired on a wired connection. Sometimes it seems like you have a zillion network cables but when you start using the ones you never thought you would, man it feels good. I never run a single cable anywhere unless it is ancillary only, for wall ports I always have two. You'd be surprised how often you find a use for either dual ports for a LAG or a return for something (this is more techy than consumer).

Last suggestion is to run some ancillary cables for odd devices such as remote access points, surveillance cameras, and other such devices.

Enjoy your wired home.
Ya it is kind of an open area but it's also where all the maintenance stuff is for the most part so HVAC, water heater etc. I don't think it will cause much of an issue.

I do think ill maximize the double wall in the office and spare bedroom. I do think installing a few more ports at TV location or at least a string to pull more wire someday would be good. Right now I only have 1 TV so trying to realistically think where others might go is a bit tough.


Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
I can't add much to jkee and eekthecat's ideas but I believe the wall mounted rack is something that you will be glad to have installed as time passes it just makes a tidy installation. look around
I agree, it makes things more expensive but I guess would not be a totally necessary thing day 1.

Quote from jkee View Post :
It might actually work well to run all the wires back to a location closer to the service entrance, it would use a bit more wire. This obviously depends on other obstructions and things like electrical, plumbing, hvac.

If walls I marked don't line right up with joists and there isn't too much duct work / plumbing the the joist bays you'd need this could end up being a pretty easy install for LR. However, it looks like the runs for your TV could end up being some of the most difficult (depending on the accuracy of your drawing and photos).

It's good to plan and think about different ancillary uses, but don't go crazy. This is an existing home that isn't undergoing a major renovation. The difficulty of running these now vs. in the future is about the same. If you plan some future renovation that would restrict future installations, that's a good time to do a few more runs, assuming you plan your runs well. I'd suggest you think of it like a tree with 90 degree branches and a main trunk. You'll want to use something like j-hooks, bridal rings, or something similar for the trunk. A cable tray would be overkill, but to each his own.

Extra cables to the TV are always a good idea. They can get used for other things too like HDBase-T for an HDMI run (may be better with STP cable) or an ir blaster. Some pull strings can also be very useful.


Racks are certainly nice and good for accommodating other equipment like switches and servers. Wall mount is a good option, but you could also mount one to the concrete floor. While I can understand the appeal of the structured media cabinets, in reality they can be hard to deal with (bigger is better).
Thats a good point about the difficulty of wiring now is the same as in the future minus some help ill have. Ya the TV will be one of the hardest, will have to go over the top, through the vaulted ceiling. It's also the wall that would be the most difficult to repair/repaint. Hoping to avoid that at all cost. Ya not planning cable trays or anything like that. but I do think extra string is a must for all runs.
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
do you have a second floor? attic?

If so consider running a large conduit from the basement to the attic to be able to service the 1st/2nd floors from the attic.

I also agree with fashioning a closet of sorts - easier to cordon off and prevent access. In my house when I finished the basement I kept the area under the stairs and enclosed it as a closet - all the network and RG6 shit runs to there, and it's pretty much useless for anything else, so it's not like I am using valuable floor space.
No second floor, it's a ranch house. I have an attic on top.
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#9
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
HVAC system is in the basement, about 10-15 ft to the right of where I proposed the rack. There is a corner there.
Attic access is in the garage.
Main breaker panel is right next to where all the services come in.
That room has quite a few corners Stick Out Tongue Without a better sense of everything it's hard to offer advice on the location.
I was guessing the attic access was in the garage or the master closet. It's nice that they made it possible to move between the garage and house in the attic. Based on the age of the house, it's almost certainly blown-in insulation which you can't move through very well without compressing / compromising it's R factor (batts in the vaulted parts).

You need to keep the area in front of the main breaker panel clear and maintain some distance between data/com wiring and your electrical wiring.
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
There is a bathroom in the basement, bottom right hand corner in blue. It's small, not used often.
Air returns are not drawn in.

the TV will be one of the hardest, will have to go over the top, through the vaulted ceiling. It's also the wall that would be the most difficult to repair/repaint. Hoping to avoid that at all cost.
I guess that other plumbing rough in is for a utility or bar sink. I'm guessing the access to the unfinished part is at the end of the 'hall' by the bathroom.

The shorter you can make your runs and the fewer turns they have the easier they are. You don't have to draw everything perfectly, but I would attempt to figure out how many of the walls I marked line up with floor joists and how many miss the joists / where the joists are.

A vaulted ceiling could cause some big problems for you. How much of the house has a vaulted ceiling (I'm guessing the kitchen and living room only)? Any chance you've got a copy of the blueprints, especially a roof truss framing diagram?
Based on your drawing and pics, I suspect you've got an air return in the living room on the wall shared with the master bathroom, but it could be in the hall. The location of this wall relative to the floor joists and panned in duct work is likely to directly correlate with the amount of cursing you do...

For runs where the sill plate isn't right on top of the floor joist, you could cut the hole for the mud ring and use a flexible bit to drill the hole. Then drop a length of some relatively small chain tied to a pull string down and catch it in the basement with some fish sticks with a hook. If the sill plate is on top of the joist you may still be able to do this if you can figure out which side of the plate to drill on to miss the joist (1.5 < 3.5) or if it's centered.
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#10
Quote from jkee View Post :
That room has quite a few corners Stick Out Tongue Without a better sense of everything it's hard to offer advice on the location.
I was guessing the attic access was in the garage or the master closet. It's nice that they made it possible to move between the garage and house in the attic. Based on the age of the house, it's almost certainly blown-in insulation which you can't move through very well without compressing / compromising it's R factor (batts in the vaulted parts).

You need to keep the area in front of the main breaker panel clear and maintain some distance between data/com wiring and your electrical wiring.

I guess that other plumbing rough in is for a utility or bar sink. I'm guessing the access to the unfinished part is at the end of the 'hall' by the bathroom.

The shorter you can make your runs and the fewer turns they have the easier they are. You don't have to draw everything perfectly, but I would attempt to figure out how many of the walls I marked line up with floor joists and how many miss the joists / where the joists are.

A vaulted ceiling could cause some big problems for you. How much of the house has a vaulted ceiling (I'm guessing the kitchen and living room only)? Any chance you've got a copy of the blueprints, especially a roof truss framing diagram?
Based on your drawing and pics, I suspect you've got an air return in the living room on the wall shared with the master bathroom, but it could be in the hall. The location of this wall relative to the floor joists and panned in duct work is likely to directly correlate with the amount of cursing you do...

For runs where the sill plate isn't right on top of the floor joist, you could cut the hole for the mud ring and use a flexible bit to drill the hole. Then drop a length of some relatively small chain tied to a pull string down and catch it in the basement with some fish sticks with a hook. If the sill plate is on top of the joist you may still be able to do this if you can figure out which side of the plate to drill on to miss the joist (1.5 < 3.5) or if it's centered.
I will try and take a photo if you would like, the HVAC stack isn't very exciting. Ya it is blown in, I have been up there once or twice, there are joist to walk on that make it possible to get around, finding where you are will be a bit tough.

Ya that probably is for a bar or something, For a while I thought it was for anti hammer but I think there is a drain near by. It would really be in the middle of the room for a bar. The unfinished area has 2 entrances, both sides of the space. Lights are kind of goofy with 2 switches. I need to put a fixture with more bulbs in there at a minimum.

I will spend some time figuring out where joist are, In the pictures Joists run North to South, so a decent number should line up.

Vaulted ceiling is only over the main floor living room. It's not vaulted all the way to the roof but much more than just a standard ceiling. It's more of a inner vault if that makes sense. I agree it's going to be the most difficult. No I don't have a copy of the blue prints. I wish I knew who the builder was and I would attempt to contact them for a copy. No air return on the common wall with the master. It's in the hall way between rooms.
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#11
Locating walls relative to joists can be tricky. A stud finder may or may not help. If you've got hard wood floors the stud finder doesn't help much. Two things you see done are putting an insulation support in a drill and driving it in next to the baseboard in a location you can see in the basement and driving in a nail in a similar fashion (use a nail set with a finishing nail). Some very powerful magnets also work.

I'd try to figure out how/where they ran the speaker wire. As long as they didn't staple it and you don't want it, you could certainly try to tape a pull string to it and pull the wire back to the basement. Just don't pull too hard, if you encounter much resistance just pull it back the other way and quit. If you take the grill off of the air return in the hall, you can probably locate a floor joist or two in that vicinity.

For the lights, do you have 2 lights each controlled by its own switch or 1+ lights controlled by a pair of 3-way switches (turn the same light on or off in either location)? There are some reasonably cheap led strip / shop lights that could work well.

As far as finding your bearings in the attic, look for flue and plumbing vents as well as places the roof trusses change.
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#12
Make sure you are set with where you want the panel. I ran CAT6 to a corner of a room, only to decide that I wanted to move it to a hall closet, so I ran new cables and cut them as needed.

I ran coaxial at the same time and used a 3 keystone plate (2 CAT6, 1 Coaxial) at each location.

Instead of numbering, I color coated the keystones both at the plate and the patch panel (8 colors, 16 total).

At first I started with a beautiful 24 port gigabit switch, but later decided to just use a 8 port gigabit and 16 port 10/100. Not only was the upfront cost cheaper ($60 vs $15), but at idle the 24 port used $15/yr in electricity vs the other two using a total of $2.50/yr. The only gigabit device is my NAS.

Even though the modem is in the closet, I placed the router in the room where I normally sit so I can get better wireless speeds. The router then connects back to the closet for the switches. This may not be recommended, but it works in my situation.
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#13
Quote from jkee View Post :
Locating walls relative to joists can be tricky. A stud finder may or may not help. If you've got hard wood floors the stud finder doesn't help much. Two things you see done are putting an insulation support in a drill and driving it in next to the baseboard in a location you can see in the basement and driving in a nail in a similar fashion (use a nail set with a finishing nail). Some very powerful magnets also work.

I'd try to figure out how/where they ran the speaker wire. As long as they didn't staple it and you don't want it, you could certainly try to tape a pull string to it and pull the wire back to the basement. Just don't pull too hard, if you encounter much resistance just pull it back the other way and quit. If you take the grill off of the air return in the hall, you can probably locate a floor joist or two in that vicinity.

For the lights, do you have 2 lights each controlled by its own switch or 1+ lights controlled by a pair of 3-way switches (turn the same light on or off in either location)? There are some reasonably cheap led strip / shop lights that could work well.

As far as finding your bearings in the attic, look for flue and plumbing vents as well as places the roof trusses change.
The lights is 2 lights each controlled on it's own switch. Link to those shop lights your talking about? Might be worth converting it.

Quote from Scratchy View Post :
Make sure you are set with where you want the panel. I ran CAT6 to a corner of a room, only to decide that I wanted to move it to a hall closet, so I ran new cables and cut them as needed.

I ran coaxial at the same time and used a 3 keystone plate (2 CAT6, 1 Coaxial) at each location.

Instead of numbering, I color coated the keystones both at the plate and the patch panel (8 colors, 16 total).

At first I started with a beautiful 24 port gigabit switch, but later decided to just use a 8 port gigabit and 16 port 10/100. Not only was the upfront cost cheaper ($60 vs $15), but at idle the 24 port used $15/yr in electricity vs the other two using a total of $2.50/yr. The only gigabit device is my NAS.

Even though the modem is in the closet, I placed the router in the room where I normally sit so I can get better wireless speeds. The router then connects back to the closet for the switches. This may not be recommended, but it works in my situation.
Ya I am pretty sure that where I want the panel. in an ideal world it would be next to the electrical which is where the cable terminates now, however it's a concrete foundation wall, with a small window right next to it, and shelving that all fits, so moving it would all be tough, so this secondary location works pretty well. I can't really see finishing the area every. This is close enough to the HVAC it would probably be in it's own area anyways.

My number of runs has ballooned a little after my buddy came over and we talked. Cost to run 20 lines vs 40 isn't much more other than time. Overkill yes. I decided I wanted all white so it doesn't stand out too much. It also simplifies the ordering process a lot as it gives me flexibility. I guess there is always the sharpie side for the panel. I kind of figured I would number them.

I am now trying to decide if I want to pull RG6 or not. Cost for 1000ft looks to be about $90 for quad shield, so not a ton. The house already has RG6 in it, and a jack per room. I don't subscribe to TV service right now and don't see subscribing in the future. However using it for an antenna could be nice, and I could see adding it to a few places like the dining room, garage, etc. The other thing is the termination points of the new RG6 and existing RG6 would be different.

Thoughts?
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#14
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
The lights is 2 lights each controlled on it's own switch. Link to those shop lights your talking about? Might be worth converting it.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Lithon.../205570126
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Commer.../205331022
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Commer.../206028970
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Feit-E.../205704101

Hard wired is going to be better than the cord and plug connected 'shop light'. I saw a cheap led shop light at sam's club the other day for ~$20, but looked it up later and reviews weren't great.

Your electrician friend can show you what would have to be done to tie the lights together and add 3-way switches, if you decide to do that.

Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Ya I am pretty sure that where I want the panel. in an ideal world it would be next to the electrical which is where the cable terminates now, however it's a concrete foundation wall, with a small window right next to it, and shelving that all fits, so moving it would all be tough, so this secondary location works pretty well. I can't really see finishing the area every. This is close enough to the HVAC it would probably be in it's own area anyways.
You don't want it right in front of / on top of the panned in duct work as shown in your pictures (current shelf). You'll want to go to one side. If HVAC isn't in the way, I'd probably go to the right in your picture, beyond the plumbing.

With the number of runs you're planning, different colors of wire will be very helpful, eg. 1 blue, 1 black, 1 gray to each jack location. Also pick up a cheap handheld label printer ~$10 on sale.
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Last edited by jkee February 26, 2016 at 11:37 AM
Joined Jun 2005
Let Sleeping Dogs Lie
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#15
Couple of things you can usually run wires next to the return air ducts pretty easily. make sure you don't have any water lines that could break near the equipment and if you have Tornadoes or other disasters put it in the corner that is most survivable.
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