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Laminate Flooring Questions

Pedantyc 4,499 566 February 22, 2016 at 10:40 AM
Getting ready to start laying some flooring in my house and had a couple of questions for anyone that has suffered through this before.

I have a general idea on how to handle my gap under baseboards as well as transitions to stairs and tile with T-strips and reducers.

Question I am having has to do with continuity throughout the area. I would like to simply continue the strips through doorways without doing transitions under the door, but I know I will run into issues with my house not being square.

How do I keep flow through a house when I am almost positive that the room at the other end will be a few degrees off from the room that I start with? I don't want to have a room that appears to look diagonal with the flooring but I'm not sure how to avoid this without a full transition under some doors.

I can draw a crappy sketch of the area if that helps. A 90 degree turn in a hallway should make the project that much more fun.

EDIT:

Poorly drawn non-scale diagram attached. Bathrooms are tile and stairs are not being done. Need to do the landing though. That L shaped hallway connecting the bedrooms is getting done as well.

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#2
you answered your own question. Separate with T-strips. This will also help manage expansion.
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#3
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
you answered your own question. Separate with T-strips. This will also help manage expansion.
That is kind of what I am thinking. It would make doing my house one room at a time much easier since I will be living there as this is happening. I just prefer a continuous piece of wood look rather than starts and stops at every doorway.
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#4
Quote from Pedantyc View Post :
Getting ready to start laying some flooring in my house and had a couple of questions for anyone that has suffered through this before.

I have a general idea on how to handle my gap under baseboards as well as transitions to stairs and tile with T-strips and reducers.

Question I am having has to do with continuity throughout the area. I would like to simply continue the strips through doorways without doing transitions under the door, but I know I will run into issues with my house not being square.

How do I keep flow through a house when I am almost positive that the room at the other end will be a few degrees off from the room that I start with? I don't want to have a room that appears to look diagonal with the flooring but I'm not sure how to avoid this without a full transition under some doors.

I can draw a crappy sketch of the area if that helps. A 90 degree turn in a hallway should make the project that much more fun.

EDIT:

Poorly drawn non-scale diagram attached. Bathrooms are tile and stairs are not being done. Need to do the landing though. That L shaped hallway connecting the bedrooms is getting done as well.
How out-of-square is it? If it's not much you may not even notice - especially at opposite ends of the house. An alternative would be to do the strips at a 45 degree diagonal to the wall - should hide any non-squareness pretty well - or change direction around the L hallway - have the strips go lengthwise (or crosswise) along each "leg" of the L and diagonal at the "corner" of the L; this would break the pattern up making it more difficult to discern the non-squareness. Not sure how it would look though.
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#5
Quote from mmathis View Post :
How out-of-square is it? If it's not much you may not even notice - especially at opposite ends of the house. An alternative would be to do the strips at a 45 degree diagonal to the wall - should hide any non-squareness pretty well - or change direction around the L hallway - have the strips go lengthwise (or crosswise) along each "leg" of the L and diagonal at the "corner" of the L; this would break the pattern up making it more difficult to discern the non-squareness. Not sure how it would look though.
I haven't ripped carpet out yet or moved all the junk so measuring to the accuracy to make certain of that is tough right now. I may lay some string this weekend and see how straight the L hallway corner is vs the parallel walls on the rooms themselves.

I thought about doing the entire project at a 45 degree to handle all of these problems but I think that may stress my measuring and saw skills further than I have pushed them before.
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#6
what direction are you going to lay the grain? since you have a hallway that connects all the bedrooms, you can make a straight line there, and then you'll have angled cuts on the outside walls of the buildings.
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#7
Quote from desrtrnnr View Post :
what direction are you going to lay the grain? since you have a hallway that connects all the bedrooms, you can make a straight line there, and then you'll have angled cuts on the outside walls of the buildings.
Haven't pulled up the carpet yet to figure which direction I need to go to go across the trusses. If everything ends up running North/South on that diagram I can see that working if I understand you correctly.
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#8
Quote from Pedantyc View Post :
Haven't pulled up the carpet yet to figure which direction I need to go to go across the trusses. If everything ends up running North/South on that diagram I can see that working if I understand you correctly.

with the layout of your house, I wouldn't be surprised if the floor joist went multiple directions. I made a quick layout in paint. If you are doing a floating laminate floor, it won't really matter which way you run it.
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#9
since you don't have a long view to look at (other than hallways) it really doesn't matter which direction you run the floor N - S or E - W.

If you do the hall separate and use transitions, you can run all the rooms in different directions.

don't worry about floor joist. it's plywood under carpet.

The landing I would run left-right
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Last edited by stufine February 23, 2016 at 01:35 PM
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