Forum Thread

Voltage(?) dip when printer kicks on

Dr. J 25,032 3,353 March 20, 2016 at 07:55 AM
So I got a new Dell H625CDW printer a couple months ago to replace a HP Laserjet. It's an AIW, FWIW. I've been noticing that when it "kicks on" from sleep mode, and intermittently (there's an audible noise from the printer briefly), there's a voltage dip in the line. I think that's what it is because a (halogen) desk lamp I have dims/flickers, and sometimes I can hear my PC UPS "click" (like the battery/AC relay is swapping).

Usually the UPS click only happens when the printer kicks on, but not during the intermittent audible noises from the printer, but both times the lamp flickers.

I realize laser printers suck up juice due to the thermals involved.

This hasn't been much of an issue but yesterday, while I was waking up the PC from sleep, my wife printed something from her laptop and I believe the momentary voltage blip caused my MFT to be corrupted. Although my data was safe, I wound up reinstalling windows. It MIGHT have been a coincidence but it's unlikely.

The UPS, a Cyberpower, is connected to my PC via USB and has not indicated any power anomalies, even when I can hear it clicking due to the printer.

SO my question is, is there something I can plug the printer into to help with these momentary surges of power consumption (at least that's what I think is going on)? The PC, monitors and some peripherals, but NOT the printer are plugged into the same UPS. The printer is plugged into the same outlet as the UPS so obviously they are on the same circuit.

Would a UPS on the printer help?

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#2
First thing to try would be moving the printer to a different circuit. Hopefully it has wired or wireless networking.
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#3
Quote from jkee View Post :
First thing to try would be moving the printer to a different circuit. Hopefully it has wired or wireless networking.
I agree. Our color laser printer did the same thing until I ran an extension cord to an outlet that was connected to a different circuit breaker. Eventually I hired an electrician and he replaced the 15 amp breaker for a 20 amp and then not more troubles.
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#4
Printers can draw quite a bit of power on startup which is one of the reasons UPS makers tell you not to connect them to the UPS (along with the obvious reason that printers are not essential devices to keep up during an outage).

As noted already, you should take the printer off the same circuit as the UPS. Since the voltage drops, it could be the wiring on the line, some defect in the printer or some other electrical problem. An electrician would be better able to help isolate the potential causes. Whatever the cause, I would get the printer off the circuit your PC is on first and ideally put it on a line that does not have any significant power draw to other things on it if possible.
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#5
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
breaker. Eventually I hired an electrician and he replaced the 15 amp breaker for a 20 amp and then not more troubles.
you shouldn't just replace the breaker that wouldn't solve anything and would create hazards.

Quote from Dr. J View Post :
Would a UPS on the printer help?
How old is the house? Keep the printer off the UPS. You could upgrade the UPS to a model with AVR (automatic voltage regulation) if yours lacks this. There could be a bad connection somewhere in the circuit and an electrician would be able to identify if that's the case.

I seem to vaguely recall you might have aluminium wiring? I could be mixing you up with someone else.
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Last edited by jkee March 20, 2016 at 10:12 AM
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#6
Quote from jkee View Post :
you shouldn't just replace the breaker that wouldn't solve anything and would create hazards.


How old is the house? Keep the printer off the UPS. You could upgrade the UPS to a model with AVR (automatic voltage regulation) if yours lacks this. There could be a bad connection somewhere in the circuit and an electrician would be able to identify if that's the case.

I seem to vaguely recall you might have aluminium wiring? I could be mixing you up with someone else.

House is 12 yo. No Al wiring.... that was the previous place (condo).

I could run a separate circuit to the printer location as I have basement access. I figured that would help but it's more of a chore to accomplish.
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#7
why do people keeping printers plugged into UPSs? do people really need printer access during the rare power outage?

I've seen this in several other threads now. It's puzzling.
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#8
Quote from fyu View Post :
why do people keeping printers plugged into UPSs? do people really need printer access during the rare power outage?

I've seen this in several other threads now. It's puzzling.

Not sure what you are insinuating, but no the printer in question is not plugged into the UPS but is plugged into the same outlet the UPS is plugged into. This is a home/office, so it isn't wired for multiple breakers per room
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#9
FWIW the UPS in question is:

CyberPower CP1500AVRLCD Intelligent LCD UPS 1500VA 900W AVR Mini-Tower
[amazon.com]
However I just bought another one which is powering a new NAS which is:
CyberPower CP1000PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS System [bhphotovideo.com]

I can swap them if anyone thinks the newer model will be better.

Would an AC line filter help (on the printer)?
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#10
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
FWIW the UPS in question is:

CyberPower CP1500AVRLCD Intelligent LCD UPS 1500VA 900W AVR Mini-Tower
[amazon.com]
However I just bought another one which is powering a new NAS which is:
CyberPower CP1000PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS System [bhphotovideo.com]

I can swap them if anyone thinks the newer model will be better.

Would an AC line filter help (on the printer)?

They both have voltage regulation (AVR) so I would tend to doubt it unless there is a malfunction. The main difference between the two types is the one on the NAS is a pure sine wave model (outputs a pure sine wave) which is better but that is only in play when the switch over occurs to battery.
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#11
Quote from Dr. J View Post :
I can swap them if anyone thinks the newer model will be better.

Would an AC line filter help (on the printer)?
No harm in trying a swap of the 2 UPS, but likely minimal benefit.

Irrelevant if you keep the printer off of the UPS. Most UPS and surge protectors have some type of "AC line filter".

Running a new electrical circuit would be the most effective option. You could also try to identify everything on the same circuit as the printer and move a few things to other places. If there's a bad connection at the panel or in a junction box somewhere that could be a factor but it's not that likely.
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#12
i dont know, but if the lamp connected to ups too, then ups not doing it's job

i will fix it sooner, save some battery cycle/life
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Last edited by Left4Deal May 6, 2016 at 04:09 PM
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#13
Quote from Left4Deal View Post :
i dont know, but if the lamp connected to ups too, then ups not doing it's job
The transient could just be of a magnitude or duration that's below the threshold where the UPS takes action. If you want to get technical about it you could always hook up an oscilloscope.

Most UPS have some outlets that are surge protection only, make sure you don't have your computer hooked up to those.
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#14
Quote from jkee View Post :
you shouldn't just replace the breaker that wouldn't solve anything and would create hazards.
I agree which is why I said an electrician (a licensed one BTW) did the job. I'm sure he wouldn't want to be liable for bad workmanship. California frowns on that.
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Last edited by dale_101798 March 20, 2016 at 09:02 PM
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#15
Quote from jkee View Post :
No harm in trying a swap of the 2 UPS, but likely minimal benefit.

Irrelevant if you keep the printer off of the UPS. Most UPS and surge protectors have some type of "AC line filter".

Running a new electrical circuit would be the most effective option. You could also try to identify everything on the same circuit as the printer and move a few things to other places. If there's a bad connection at the panel or in a junction box somewhere that could be a factor but it's not that likely.
Quote from Left4Deal View Post :
i dont know, but if the lamp connected to ups too, then ups not doing it's job

i will fix it sooner, save some battery cycle/life

Lamp is in its own socket but in the same room and therefore on the same circuit, likely. The lamp is not on the UPS, just the PC and monitors (2).

I will likely have to resort to running a new circuit from the basement.
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