Forum Thread

Options for running internet to in-law suite

fronty 871 125 March 24, 2016 at 08:48 PM
I want to have internet access to an in-law suite. My current internet access is through DSL. I have a Netgear modem/router currently (B90-755025-15). The wifi signal is very poor in the house, so it definitely does not reach the in-law suite. The in-law suite is around 50 to 100 feet away from my house. What are my options?

There is not a phone line currently ran out to the in-law suite. I could run an ethernet cord to it, but I would prefer a wireless method. Do you know of a router that can send a signal that far out? If so, do I just connect an ethernet cord from my existing modem/router to the new router?

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#2
Quote from fronty View Post :
I want to have internet access to an in-law suite. My current internet access is through DSL. I have a Netgear modem/router currently (B90-755025-15). The wifi signal is very poor in the house, so it definitely does not reach the in-law suite. The in-law suite is around 50 to 100 feet away from my house. What are my options?

There is not a phone line currently ran out to the in-law suite. I could run an ethernet cord to it, but I would prefer a wireless method. Do you know of a router that can send a signal that far out? If so, do I just connect an ethernet cord from my existing modem/router to the new router?
The wifi in most DSL gateways isn't that great. Ethernet really shouldn't be run between buildings.

Yes you can connect a new better router to your existing gateway. There are a few different ways to do this:
-Try just putting it a couple feet from the current router.
-Run an ethernet cable to a location in the house closest to the in-law suite and connect the new router.
-Use a pair of HomePlug AV2 adapters in place of running the cable.
-Put a HomePlug adapter in the in-law suite and locate a router there or use a wired connection.

Since the wifi is poor in the house, I'd locate a better router in the main house. It's just a matter of where you put it and how you configure it. If that doesn't provide adequate wifi to the in-law suite, try a home plug adapter in the in law suite paired with a cheaper router. There are always other options like directional antennas if necessary.
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#3
Quote from fronty View Post :
I want to have internet access to an in-law suite. My current internet access is through DSL. I have a Netgear modem/router currently (B90-755025-15). The wifi signal is very poor in the house, so it definitely does not reach the in-law suite. The in-law suite is around 50 to 100 feet away from my house. What are my options?

There is not a phone line currently ran out to the in-law suite. I could run an ethernet cord to it, but I would prefer a wireless method. Do you know of a router that can send a signal that far out? If so, do I just connect an ethernet cord from my existing modem/router to the new router?
Without changing the existing configuration of your current router, you can get a new router and just configure it to use as an access point.

The easiest way is configure the wireless signals then turn off DHCP on the new router. After that you can connect a Ethernet cable on one of the LAN ports (not the WAN) to one of the LAN ports on your existing router.

Note: Guest network built into the new router will not work when using the above method. You can only use the primary wireless settings. Also look for a router with external antennas. There are many options out there, it all depends on how much you want to spend. So far my current go to router is TP-Link Archer C9 (around $120 as of this writing).

One review of ASUS RT-AC5300 from newegg reported it covered a 6k sq foot house. Only way to know is trying it out and other factors can cause signal loss. From experience wireless signals don't penetrate well through brick or concrete.
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#4
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#5
Totally forgot about the Home Plugs, these are YMMV. These are very nice options if you can get data through the power line. Recently I haven't had luck when plugging it into a garage and the other end at the router from inside the house. The adapters worked inside the house though, not sure what's the issue unless the lines were going through different set of breakers aside from where the router sits at.
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#6
I installed a tp-link high power outdoor access point to eliminate problems to my neighbors across the street. it was about $60
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#7
Homeplugs generally don't work past a second panel. I would assume the second building has it's own sub panel.

I know OP said wireless but you will likely have more trouble and speed/reliability issues that way. 50-100 ft is really pretty close. Bury some conduit and run 2+ Ethernet lines with a pull string. Yes it's more work and a bit more money but it will be reliable and future proof. Then put a second access point in and done.

Wireless options are tough to know if they will provide a strong enough signal from the 1st house 2 the second. It's a guess with nearly anything. I tend to look to Ubiquiti gear for this type of stuff. It's enterprise gear and requires some knowledge to setup and keep running, it's not your average consumer wifi router. That said I would look at https://www.ubnt.com/unifi/unifi-ap-ac-lr/ and http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-Na...s=ubiquiti
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#8
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Homeplugs generally don't work past a second panel. I would assume the second building has it's own sub panel.

I know OP said wireless but you will likely have more trouble and speed/reliability issues that way. 50-100 ft is really pretty close. Bury some conduit and run 2+ Ethernet lines with a pull string. Yes it's more work and a bit more money but it will be reliable and future proof. Then put a second access point in and done.

Wireless options are tough to know if they will provide a strong enough signal from the 1st house 2 the second. It's a guess with nearly anything. I tend to look to Ubiquiti gear for this type of stuff. It's enterprise gear and requires some knowledge to setup and keep running, it's not your average consumer wifi router. That said I would look at https://www.ubnt.com/unifi/unifi-ap-ac-lr/ and http://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-Na...s=ubiquiti [amazon.com]
I also recommend the ubiquiti gear for this. Maybe an outdoor access point if its close enough, or point-to-point setup. That would be the most stable solution.
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#9
HomePlug is hit and miss and I don't love that it works by injecting noise in your AC lines. However it doesn't hurt to try it but I'd try to improve wifi without it first. The AV2 adapters with a ground plug are better than the old ones. If you try one, buy local for easier returns. Also in some newer homes with AFCI breakers you may have problems with HomePlug.

There are lots of options for the wifi. I'd try to improve the wifi inside the main house first and then see what it takes to get the in-law suite up to par.

What devices are going to be used in the in-law suite?
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#10
Does the MIL have Cable TV there you could do MOCA?

you can probably find some for less as you probably don't have really HS internet with DSL

http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-B...ca+adapter
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#11
It will be mainly for just internet browsing for guests.

Thanks for all the suggestions. I appreciate it. I'll go the wireless route first and see how that goes.
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Last edited by fronty March 25, 2016 at 11:31 AM
#12
I just finished adding gigabit Ethernet to a detached structure behind my house. I'm sure other options are better, but I bought 125 ft of direct bury cat6 cable off eBay for ~$40 and ran the cable from the switch in my house, thru the attic, down the back of a downspout, and then shallow buried it across the yard (<6 inches) by making a slit with a spade. Ran it into the garage and it works great. Put it in PVC where it entered/exited the ground to protect from the weedeater. It may not last 20 years but it seems to easily meet my need at the moment and the price was right.
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#13
Quote from WaarrEagle View Post :
I just finished adding gigabit Ethernet to a detached structure behind my house. I'm sure other options are better, but I bought 125 ft of direct bury cat6 cable off eBay for ~$40 and ran the cable from the switch in my house, thru the attic, down the back of a downspout, and then shallow buried it across the yard (<6 inches) by making a slit with a spade. Ran it into the garage and it works great. Put it in PVC where it entered/exited the ground to protect from the weedeater. It may not last 20 years but it seems to easily meet my need at the moment and the price was right.
This is exactly what I was thinking. WaarrEagle stole my thunder.bounce
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#14
Quote from WaarrEagle View Post :
I just finished adding gigabit Ethernet to a detached structure behind my house. I'm sure other options are better, but I bought 125 ft of direct bury cat6 cable off eBay for ~$40 and ran the cable from the switch in my house, thru the attic, down the back of a downspout, and then shallow buried it across the yard (<6 inches) by making a slit with a spade. Ran it into the garage and it works great. Put it in PVC where it entered/exited the ground to protect from the weedeater. It may not last 20 years but it seems to easily meet my need at the moment and the price was right.

This would work great. The conduit I suggested would make it a bit more future poof but this will work great and cheaper than powerline adapters.
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#15
Quote from fronty View Post :
It will be mainly for just internet browsing for guests.

Thanks for all the suggestions. I appreciate it. I'll go the wireless route first and see how that goes.
Try the new router in different locations, preferably on an upper floor in a room closer to the MIL suite (but also try the current location). It doesn't need to be connected to anything to test this (in a limited capacity), you'll see the network and be able to connect to it but won't have internet access until you connect it up. When it comes time to connect it, you can either move your DSL gateway to the same room, run ethernet, or use HomePlug.

As to setup, there are lots of choices. I'd try turning off the wifi in your dsl gateway first to evaluate performance, try different channels 1, 6, and 11 and check the strength of nearby networks.

Another option to consider is turning the gateway into just a modem disabling other functions, this is accomplished by setting the gateway wan mode to transparent bridging. If you do this you will have to enter your PPPoE credentials into the new router or you'll lose internet access, this could require contacting the phone company.

If you leave the existing gateway alone, there are a few different ways to setup the new router. Your options will depend on the particular device, but know that some of the options could make it hard to access the new router's settings in the future, and you may have to reset the router to regain access.
1. disable NAT & DHCP, assign the router a static ip in the same subnet (eg. 192.168.1.2) as the gateway. Modify the dsl gateway's dhcp settings to reserve a few static IPs (eg start at 192.168.1.10). This would preserve access to settings (as opposed to the way something similar was described earlier). Connect lan port on gateway to any port on router. This is a little harder to setup, try the other options if available first.
2. set new router to access point mode if it exists. New router will have an IP address that changes and is assigned by the gateway
3. set new router to bridging for the wan mode after setting up wifi. Could limit access to settings, could have ip assigned by gateway or no IP address.
4. connect wan port on new router to lan port on old router without changing any settings other than wifi. The will segment your network potentially interfering with lan to lan traffic. It also creates a double NAT that can cause problems with some programs. It's better to avoid this option.
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Last edited by jkee March 25, 2016 at 06:56 PM
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