Forum Thread

Outdoor Ethernet Blank Plate

DrDavid 319 216 March 28, 2016 at 06:42 PM
I bought a new house that was wired for ethernet. The wiring was designed by previous owner who had to back out of the house.

On the outside of house on stucco are a couple of blank plates, behind these plate are ethernet cables with the plastic caps to plug into something like a PoE security camera.

Do you think this is safe? I am scared water may seep underneath plates and lead to mold somehow? Maybe I am just being paranoid.

Thanks for your help!

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#2
should be relatively easy to waterproof.. I don't see any issues assuming they did with something like silicone around the edge of the plate - you could check and/or add some yourself if you wanted to.
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#3
Quote from DrDavid View Post :
I bought a new house that was wired for ethernet. The wiring was designed by previous owner who had to back out of the house.

On the outside of house on stucco are a couple of blank plates, behind these plate are ethernet cables with the plastic caps to plug into something like a PoE security camera.

Do you think this is safe? I am scared water may seep underneath plates and lead to mold somehow? Maybe I am just being paranoid.

Thanks for your help!
Figure out what you want to use for a camera and how it mounts/connects, go from there. You'll also want to evaluate how well the location of the current wall plate matches up with where you'd like a camera (think viewing angle). Are these wall plates on a flat wall surface or under the eaves/in the soffit?

Some cameras may be able to fit entirely over the existing hole. With other's you'd need to use some weatherproof plates / conduit fittings. Other boxes / conduit will be required most likely if you want multiple cameras in a particular location.

Here's one manual as an example: http://www.nellyssecurity.com/med...camera.pdf
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Last edited by jkee March 28, 2016 at 09:58 PM
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#4
There are some very specific designs for weatherproofing cat5 and rj45 boxes. The box cover should have a gasket and there should also be a seal around it or at the point where the cable goes into the wall to prevent water from getting past it. You'd have to take the cover off and inspect the box. As slapshot mentioned, the cheap and easy method would be just to add some silicone.

If you're feeling handy I might look at some of the IP65 rated single jack adaptors that have a rubber cover.
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#5
I can't tell where this is and that matters. Is it on the underside of an eve or just on the side of the house? If it's the underside it's probably ok, if it's on the side then I would climb up closer and take a look and see if there is any gasket. It looks pretty much like a standard wall plate to me. Hard to tell without more info.
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#6
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
I can't tell where this is and that matters. Is it on the underside of an eve or just on the side of the house? If it's the underside it's probably ok, if it's on the side then I would climb up closer and take a look and see if there is any gasket. It looks pretty much like a standard wall plate to me. Hard to tell without more info.

The pic appears to have been taken of the wall and from below looking up at the cover.

Also if your home is in the Florida everglades things might be different in northern Montana.

Average humidity and rainfall would count for a lot. To be sure I would seal it up the best way possible.
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#7
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
The pic appears to have been taken of the wall and from below looking up at the cover.
If it is a wall, the OP will need a bracket that works with their camera and the size and orientation of the wall box. As an example: http://www.nellyssecurity.com/acc...dmvf2.html

If you've got wall boxes like this you're probably looking at dome cameras.
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#8
Quote from DrDavid View Post :
I bought a new house that was wired for ethernet. The wiring was designed by previous owner who had to back out of the house.

On the outside of house on stucco are a couple of blank plates, behind these plate are ethernet cables with the plastic caps to plug into something like a PoE security camera.

Do you think this is safe? I am scared water may seep underneath plates and lead to mold somehow? Maybe I am just being paranoid.

Thanks for your help!
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#9
Quote from jkee View Post :
If it is a wall, the OP will need a bracket that works with their camera and the size and orientation of the wall box. As an example: http://www.nellyssecurity.com/acc...dmvf2.html
I agree however the OP never mentioned he was going to install cameras Roll Eyes (Sarcastic)
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#10
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
I agree however the OP never mentioned he was going to install cameras Roll Eyes (Sarcastic)
um...
Quote from DrDavid View Post :
plug into something like a PoE security camera.
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#11
I plan on using PoE cameras. but there is 1 location that is weird towards the grass and its not necessary. I'll seal that.
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#12
Quote from brbubba View Post :
There are some very specific designs for weatherproofing cat5 and rj45 boxes. The box cover should have a gasket and there should also be a seal around it or at the point where the cable goes into the wall to prevent water from getting past it. You'd have to take the cover off and inspect the box. As slapshot mentioned, the cheap and easy method would be just to add some silicone.

If you're feeling handy I might look at some of the IP65 rated single jack adaptors that have a rubber cover.
Its just like a coax run from comcast - create a loop for water gather, fill hole with expanding foam.

OP i wouldnt worry about those boxes.
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#13
Quote from Metric View Post :
Its just like a coax run from comcast - create a loop for water gather, fill hole with expanding foam.

OP i wouldnt worry about those boxes.
If ethernet is exposed a drip loop is a good idea. However, most ethernet cable isn't rated for outdoor use (weather / sun). Personally i'd use conduit over exposed ethernet.

The other problem is most cameras use in line rj-45 jacks and the wires are already terminated and there presumably isn't much extra wire to work with. This complicates how you might hook up a camera if it doesn't just fit directly over the wall box.
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#14
Quote from jkee View Post :
If ethernet is exposed a drip loop is a good idea. However, most ethernet cable isn't rated for outdoor use (weather / sun). Personally i'd use conduit over exposed ethernet.

The other problem is most cameras use in line rj-45 jacks and the wires are already terminated and there presumably isn't much extra wire to work with. This complicates how you might hook up a camera if it doesn't just fit directly over the wall box.
Ive had a cat5 running outside for about 14yrs - no issues... but yes, not rated.
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#15
Quote from Metric View Post :
Ive had a cat5 running outside for about 14yrs - no issues... but yes, not rated.
I'm guessing you painted it or it gets minimal sun. Also, cat-5 lightning rods are best avoided. The previous owner of my Aunt's house improperly ran cat-5 to a roof top deck and also left out the drip loop, it was a relic of the days before wifi. They didn't have it connected, but ignored my advice that is was installed wrong and got a lot of water inside the house during a big storm.
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