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Free Amazon kindle books for Apr 25. Set of well reviewed books (4+ stars and > 100 reviews)

weaver145 892 2,798 April 25, 2016 at 06:09 AM in Books & Magazines (4) More Amazon Deals
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Last Edited by weaver145 April 25, 2016 at 07:36 AM
Free Amazon kindle books for Apr 25. Set of well reviewed books (4+ stars and > 100 reviews) [amazon.com]

I offer these daily lists as a healthy alternative to the junk crap scam guides and coloring books that are peddled here daily by unscrupulous publishers. Please see the link below for more information about this:

Why does 100+ 4 star reviews matter? Simple. Amazon lists many thousands of books that regularly drop in price to "free". The vast majority of these books, however are nothing but trashy romance novels and worthless "how to" or "self-help" books and "box sets". Many of these guides are published with the express intent to defraud less savvy readers.

These free guides (with very few exceptions) seldom contain anything but transcribed public domain online content, recipes and articles lifted from sources like Wikipedia. [reddit.com] They are given catchy titles like "DiY Box Set of basket weaving" or "25 Amazing Tips to Lose Weight Fast" or "50 Best Crockpot Recipes Ever!" Or "ZenMasterDoodle adult coloring book" (containing nothing but public domain stock images) . These guides take literally minutes to package and publish. These publishers attribute the material to a fictitious author (often with a Western sounding name). They also frequently Pay for fake 5 star reviews (or generate their own).

These brochures NEED free zero dollar "sales" so they can quickly increase their Amazon sales rank and get priority on the Amazon search filters. Once their sales rank crosses above a certain level, they switch the price to several dollars and lure unsuspecting buyers believing the 44 page double spaced x-large font brochure being sold as an "Ultimate box set" of books" is actually worth money. By the time the real copyright owners can react, the book is pulled from Amazon and the material gets a fresh stock cover photo and slightly new title under a different author.

Unfortunately many of these crappy guides are promoted here on SD daily - about as frequently as they are published - (most likely by the same people who publish and profit from their sales) . They recruit your time and your Amazon account to generate their free sales. Remember: when something is free on the internet, more often than not, YOU become the product.

Anyways, by focusing on 4 stars or more with 100 + reviews you avoid filling your library with this crap and also avoid becoming an unsuspecting party to the free ebook scam.

Please don't forget to come back and thumb this post up so I know there is interest in me posting. click "follow" for early notification when I post these deals as many do expire within minutes or hours of posting. Also it helps to counteract the multitude of thumbs down I get daily from these publishers who are seeing the SD effect diminished since I started my rants against their practices.

Public service announcement: If you like the kind of books I list ( free books rated generally 4 stars or more and minimum of 100 reviews- with very few exceptions) and fear you may have missed some of my recent posts simply go here:

http://slickdeals.net/newsearch.php?searchuserid=153555&starteronly=1

Many of the deals I have posted recently can still be obtained for free and can help you build quite a library of good reads on the cheap.


Thank you and Please support real authors and not scam artists.
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited music, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.

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I want to expound on what you say weaver145:

John Scalzi (a well-known author) wrote this today about the Amazon system[Posted by me, in fair use for discussion]:
http://whatever.scalzi.com/2016/0...ixed-pots/


Scammers and Fixed Pots

APRIL 25, 2016 [scalzi.com] JOHN SCALZI [scalzi.com]2 COMMENTS [scalzi.com]
Lots of news in the last couple of weeks about Amazon Kindle Unlimited scammers, who are creating 3,000-page books filled with mostly garbagebecause that's what lets them take advantage of the way Amazon pays authors participating in the KU scheme [observer.com]: Amazon tracks the last page synced and pays out by how far into the book someone's gone (as opposed to read).
This is bad news for actual authors with actual books, because a) actual books are generally much smaller than three thousand pages, and b) Amazon doesn't pay a set rate per page — it defines a KU "pot" of money for each month and then pays out to authors by the number of pages they register readers as having been gotten through, as a proportion of total pages read on the service that month. So if (purely as an example) Amazon defines the payout pot for KU as $1 million for a month, then all the authors participating have to split that $1 million — and the scam artist with the fake 3,000-page book is going to get a larger chunk of that $1 million than the actual author with a 300-page book.
Bear in mind that no matter what compensatory Amazon does for its KU system, someone is going to find a way to maximize it. Before the current "pages read" scheme, Amazon paid out when a certain percentage of a book was gone through, which drove authors to create very short books that would hit their payout percentage with just a couple of page flips. It was this gaming, presumably, that caused Amazon to change how it did its payout. If and when Amazon changes its payout scheme (again), people will find out how to game the system under the new rules. It's what happens.
(Nor is adjusting one's work to take advantage of the market a problem; publishers have always done this. Is the money is cheap paperbacks? They will make cheap paperbacks. Is the money in hardcovers? They'll make hardcovers. What, novellas are the next big thing? They'll all make novellas! Likewise, if Amazon is saying to self-pubbed authors (and, by extension, scammers) "[X] is the way we decide to pay you," then it's rational to do [X].)
The problem with the Kindle Unlimited scammers isn't really the compensatory triggers of KU or the fact that everyone, legit author or otherwise, is looking for the way to squeeze as much money as possible from it. The problem is: who bears the immediate economic brunt of the scammers taking advantage of whatever scheme Amazon decides upon? Well, it's not Amazon, that's for sure, since its financial exposure is only what it wants to pay out on a monthly basis; scammers in the system or no, Amazon only pays what Amazon wants to pay. The readers also get off lightly; their economic exposure is only they flat fee they pay to access KU.
So that leaves the actual authors, whose share of a fixed amount of money is being diluted by bad actors who see how the system can be gamed and are cheerfully gaming it as fast as they can. It is the authors' problem because Amazon doesn't pay out like it has to pay out for printed books, where each unit sold has a contractually-defined royalty that is independent of any other book or author and how well they are selling. Again, Amazon pays from a pot it defines and controls and which is limited; in effect pitting authors against each other, and all of them against the scammers. In this case the scammers are winning because it takes almost no time to create a scam book, assign fake accounts to "read" it, and profit; meanwhile writing real books actual people would invest their time in is still the same time-intensive effort it always was.
Is this fair? Well, life's not fair, and in business (which this is) you get what you contractually agree to. Kindle Unlimited authors presumably know that they are only going to get what Amazon is willing to give them for their participation; they also presumably know that their marketplace is "fair," with regard to scammers, to the extent that Amazon wants to make it so; they also presumably know that their ability to force Amazon to do anything to deal with scammers is exceptionally limited because the KU agreement privileges Amazon over individual KU participants to an extraordinary degree. KU participants, by participating, have agreed to let Amazon shift the financial risk over to them.
(Well, some of them. It's my understanding that there is a tranche of authors — generally hugely best-selling, generally not self-published — whose participation in KU is through other deals where their compensation is not tied into an Amazon-defined pot. Good for them! And another reminder of the issue of "fair" in publishing — nothing's fair, everything is what you agree to in contracts.)
That being said, if Amazon doesn't eventually deal with the scammers, then itwill become their problem: Authors, quite reasonably, won't want to participate if scammers are taking money that should be going to them, and readers won't see the value of the KU subscription if authors stay off the service. Humans are bad-experience avoidant, and it doesn't take many bad experiences to keep people away. It's in Amazon's best interest to fix this. Eventually. I'm pretty sure it will.
But only to a point. Amazon is very very very unlikely to ever make Kindle Unlimited a scheme that doesn't rely on a fixed payout, defined by Amazon itself. And that is why, at the end of it, KU (and, to be clear, other subscription services with a service-defined payout pot) will always disadvantage authors in terms of how much they can make, and why these authors will always suffer first and foremost from scammers — because there's only so much money for authors in the scheme, and that's the money scammers are taking. There will always be scammers and people who will game the system; so as long as the KU scheme pays out from a fixed pot, authors participating in it will always be the most vulnerable to their actions.
Amazon should deal with its KU scammers. It should also compensate KU authors for their work independent of how other authors are doing, or what they are doing, or what scammers are doing. The first of these is rather more likely than the others. If you're an author participating in Kindle Unlimited, know what you're getting into, and the fact that it's you whose money is on the line when the scammers game the system.
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Thank you!
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Nice, thanks.
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Thanks, weaver145! I don't know if I can ever catch up with the book to read...
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Quote from luckygecko View Post :
I want to expound on what you say weaver145:

John Scalzi (a well-known author) wrote this today about the Amazon system[Posted by me, in fair use for discussion]:
http://whatever.scalzi.com/2016/0...ixed-pots/


Scammers and Fixed Pots

APRIL 25, 2016 [scalzi.com] JOHN SCALZI [scalzi.com]2 COMMENTS [scalzi.com]
Lots of news in the last couple of weeks about Amazon Kindle Unlimited scammers, who are creating 3,000-page books filled with mostly garbagebecause that's what lets them take advantage of the way Amazon pays authors participating in the KU scheme [observer.com]: Amazon tracks the last page synced and pays out by how far into the book someone's gone (as opposed to read).
This is bad news for actual authors with actual books, because a) actual books are generally much smaller than three thousand pages, and b) Amazon doesn't pay a set rate per page — it defines a KU "pot" of money for each month and then pays out to authors by the number of pages they register readers as having been gotten through, as a proportion of total pages read on the service that month. So if (purely as an example) Amazon defines the payout pot for KU as $1 million for a month, then all the authors participating have to split that $1 million — and the scam artist with the fake 3,000-page book is going to get a larger chunk of that $1 million than the actual author with a 300-page book.
Bear in mind that no matter what compensatory Amazon does for its KU system, someone is going to find a way to maximize it. Before the current "pages read" scheme, Amazon paid out when a certain percentage of a book was gone through, which drove authors to create very short books that would hit their payout percentage with just a couple of page flips. It was this gaming, presumably, that caused Amazon to change how it did its payout. If and when Amazon changes its payout scheme (again), people will find out how to game the system under the new rules. It's what happens.
(Nor is adjusting one's work to take advantage of the market a problem; publishers have always done this. Is the money is cheap paperbacks? They will make cheap paperbacks. Is the money in hardcovers? They'll make hardcovers. What, novellas are the next big thing? They'll all make novellas! Likewise, if Amazon is saying to self-pubbed authors (and, by extension, scammers) "[X] is the way we decide to pay you," then it's rational to do [X].)
The problem with the Kindle Unlimited scammers isn't really the compensatory triggers of KU or the fact that everyone, legit author or otherwise, is looking for the way to squeeze as much money as possible from it. The problem is: who bears the immediate economic brunt of the scammers taking advantage of whatever scheme Amazon decides upon? Well, it's not Amazon, that's for sure, since its financial exposure is only what it wants to pay out on a monthly basis; scammers in the system or no, Amazon only pays what Amazon wants to pay. The readers also get off lightly; their economic exposure is only they flat fee they pay to access KU.
So that leaves the actual authors, whose share of a fixed amount of money is being diluted by bad actors who see how the system can be gamed and are cheerfully gaming it as fast as they can. It is the authors' problem because Amazon doesn't pay out like it has to pay out for printed books, where each unit sold has a contractually-defined royalty that is independent of any other book or author and how well they are selling. Again, Amazon pays from a pot it defines and controls and which is limited; in effect pitting authors against each other, and all of them against the scammers. In this case the scammers are winning because it takes almost no time to create a scam book, assign fake accounts to "read" it, and profit; meanwhile writing real books actual people would invest their time in is still the same time-intensive effort it always was.
Is this fair? Well, life's not fair, and in business (which this is) you get what you contractually agree to. Kindle Unlimited authors presumably know that they are only going to get what Amazon is willing to give them for their participation; they also presumably know that their marketplace is "fair," with regard to scammers, to the extent that Amazon wants to make it so; they also presumably know that their ability to force Amazon to do anything to deal with scammers is exceptionally limited because the KU agreement privileges Amazon over individual KU participants to an extraordinary degree. KU participants, by participating, have agreed to let Amazon shift the financial risk over to them.
(Well, some of them. It's my understanding that there is a tranche of authors — generally hugely best-selling, generally not self-published — whose participation in KU is through other deals where their compensation is not tied into an Amazon-defined pot. Good for them! And another reminder of the issue of "fair" in publishing — nothing's fair, everything is what you agree to in contracts.)
That being said, if Amazon doesn't eventually deal with the scammers, then itwill become their problem: Authors, quite reasonably, won't want to participate if scammers are taking money that should be going to them, and readers won't see the value of the KU subscription if authors stay off the service. Humans are bad-experience avoidant, and it doesn't take many bad experiences to keep people away. It's in Amazon's best interest to fix this. Eventually. I'm pretty sure it will.
But only to a point. Amazon is very very very unlikely to ever make Kindle Unlimited a scheme that doesn't rely on a fixed payout, defined by Amazon itself. And that is why, at the end of it, KU (and, to be clear, other subscription services with a service-defined payout pot) will always disadvantage authors in terms of how much they can make, and why these authors will always suffer first and foremost from scammers — because there's only so much money for authors in the scheme, and that's the money scammers are taking. There will always be scammers and people who will game the system; so as long as the KU scheme pays out from a fixed pot, authors participating in it will always be the most vulnerable to their actions.
Amazon should deal with its KU scammers. It should also compensate KU authors for their work independent of how other authors are doing, or what they are doing, or what scammers are doing. The first of these is rather more likely than the others. If you're an author participating in Kindle Unlimited, know what you're getting into, and the fact that it's you whose money is on the line when the scammers game the system.
Quote from pkp413 View Post :
Thank you!
Quote from redfreedom View Post :
Nice, thanks.
Quote from urmeli View Post :
Thanks, weaver145! I don't know if I can ever catch up with the book to read...

Awesome folks! thanks for the added info. Support real authors!
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