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Gigabyte GA-H81M-H Intel Socket LGA 1150 Micro ATX Motherboard $23.99 After Rebate @ Amazon (Free Prime Shipping) & newegg

DealHo 335 208 May 4, 2016 at 02:04 PM in Motherboards (9) More Amazon Deals
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Last Edited by DealHo May 4, 2016 at 08:02 PM
Newegg:
$23.99 AR + $1.99 ship (free w/Shoprunner) with 15% off promo code EMCETGM55, ends today 5/4)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Pro...-_-Product

Rebate:
http://images10.newegg.com/upload...lw80us.pdf


Limit 1 Rebate per item per household (multiple SKU's OK, but only one per product, you can submit more than 1 rebate per envelope if you buy different SKU's).

Make sure that when you send the rebate you cut the entire white label off (including Model number, serial number, UPC) - Gigabyte has the EAN number really close to the UPC and many people mistakenly send that in only to have their rebate denied.


Price went up to $29.99 AR on Amazon
Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-In...ailpages00

$10 Rebate:
http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/im...34806_.pdf
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Last Edited by DealHo May 4, 2016 at 07:58 PM
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial [amazon.com] with free 2-day shipping, unlimited music, unlimited video streaming & more.

If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial [amazon.com] available.


Amazon price went up to $29.99 AR, newegg still $23.99 AR w/Shoprunner or Premier

17 Comments

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#3
Seems this has problems with faulty components and DOAs.

If you decide to get this make sure the board works before removing the UPC.
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#4
Using this mobo in my build right now and fits all my needs except there is only one header for a case fan, so keep that in mind if you're installing more than one fan, which most people do.
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#5
Nice to see cheap 1150 Mobos are still around.
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#6
Quote from donldmn View Post :
Seems this has problems with faulty components and DOAs.

If you decide to get this make sure the board works before removing the UPC.
Cheap motherboards are typically bought by people who don't have a lot of experience in building PC's. I would take online reviews with a grain of salt. User error 99% of the time. I've bought hundreds of open box motherboards (that were probably returned by these reviewers giving negative reviews), and I can count on one hand how many were actually damaged. Most just needed a BIOS update and/or the CMOS cleared.

If you buy through Amazon, you're covered since they'll take a damaged mobo back. Newegg is a bit more problematic with the returns. But Gigabyte has excellent warranty service should you have any issues.

But yes, definitely test the mobo before cutting off the UPC! Smilie
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#7
Quote from Teddo View Post :
Using this mobo in my build right now and fits all my needs except there is only one header for a case fan, so keep that in mind if you're installing more than one fan, which most people do.
If you need to hookup more than one fan to the single header, you can use a splitter like this one:

http://www.amazon.com/SilverStone...n+splitter
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#8
can this board overclock a g3258?
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#9
Quote from Sasuke18 View Post :
can this board overclock a g3258?
Can it overclock? Yes. Should you overclock on this motherboard? No.

The H81 is a super basic motherboard...it's not meant for overclocking and you'll likely fry the components if you try to run too much voltage. A few Mhz at stock voltage likely won't be a big issue, but I wouldn't try anything crazy. Go with a Z87/Z97 board if you want to OC.
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#10
Quote from Teddo View Post :
Using this mobo in my build right now and fits all my needs except there is only one header for a case fan, so keep that in mind if you're installing more than one fan, which most people do.
No usb 3.0 headers either. I bought a minipci express usb 3.0 header, but dumb thing wont fit with the processor in its way.
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#11
Quote from DealHo View Post :
Can it overclock? Yes. Should you overclock on this motherboard? No.

The H81 is a super basic motherboard...it's not meant for overclocking and you'll likely fry the components if you try to run too much voltage. A few Mhz at stock voltage likely won't be a big issue, but I wouldn't try anything crazy. Go with a Z87/Z97 board if you want to OC.
I disagree. I've overclocked many G3258 to 4.2-4.4Ghz @ 1.2v or less on H81 and B85 boards. I wouldn't pair a budget OC chip with a Z97 board myself...that partly kills the value aspect unless you got a rockin' deal on a Z-series board.

I'd also want to know how well this board can overclock the G3258 as it varies by model.
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#12
Quote from poohbie View Post :
I disagree. I've overclocked many G3258 to 4.2-4.4Ghz @ 1.2v or less on H81 and B85 boards. I wouldn't pair a budget OC chip with a Z97 board myself...that partly kills the value aspect unless you got a rockin' deal on a Z-series board.

I'd also want to know how well this board can overclock the G3258 as it varies by model.
You didn't really disagree with me though. I said "a few Mhz at stock voltage likely won't be a big issue, but I wouldn't try anything crazy". Given that the G3258 can go up as high as 5.0Ghz, I can just see a new builder getting a H81 board, setting the multiplier way high, cranking the voltage and then destroying the mobo. A Z87/Z97 would be far more robust and allow for more user error. Given that Sasuke18 asked me if the board could overclock, I assumed he's fairly new to the game.

I still maintain that while you CAN OC on an H81, it's not a good idea in general when a used Z87 board would be just a few bucks more.
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#13
Quote from DealHo View Post :
You didn't really disagree with me though. I said "a few Mhz at stock voltage likely won't be a big issue, but I wouldn't try anything crazy". Given that the G3258 can go up as high as 5.0Ghz, I can just see a new builder getting a H81 board, setting the multiplier way high, cranking the voltage and then destroying the mobo. A Z87/Z97 would be far more robust and allow for more user error. Given that Sasuke18 asked me if the board could overclock, I assumed he's fairly new to the game.

I still maintain that while you CAN OC on an H81, it's not a good idea in general when a used Z87 board would be just a few bucks more.
"a few bucks more" on SD always means much more than a few bucks. And going from 3.2Ghz to 4.2-4.4Ghz is hardly "a few Mhz." So yes I do disagree with you, lol.hug You need more than just a Z97 board to get to 5Ghz. And I'm more inclined to think that a Z97 board in inexperienced hands is more likely to kill a chip than an H81 board (many Gigabyte ones even restrict CPU voltage to 1.2v on non-Z boards). And I'd like to see cases where people actually killed budget mobos from AUTO voltage settings.
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#14
Quote from poohbie View Post :
"a few bucks more" on SD always means much more than a few bucks. And going from 3.2Ghz to 4.2-4.4Ghz is hardly "a few Mhz." So yes I do disagree with you, lol.http://i.slickdeals.net/images/smilies/emot-hug.gif You need more than just a Z97 board to get to 5Ghz. And I'm more inclined to think that a Z97 board in inexperienced hands is more likely to kill a chip than an H81 board (many Gigabyte ones even restrict CPU voltage to 1.2v on non-Z boards). And I'd like to see cases where people actually killed budget mobos from AUTO voltage settings.
OK, we'll agree to disagree. I still wouldn't recommend a H81 board for OC'ing if you intend to run the PC at the overclocked speed for any length of time. If you're just experimenting and offloading, go for it. The Z87/Z97 boards have more power phases, larger heatsinks, more BIOS options (and more frequent updates), better quality components, etc - you can keep them longer without worrying about them crapping out. Long term, they have far better resale value than a H81 mobo (so you pay more up front but lose less on the back end). I've bought open box Z87/Z97 motherboards for as little as $40 AR (Microcenter FTW).

BTW, these GA-H81M-H's do limit to 1.2V, and yes, there's little chance people are going to blow the mobo using auto voltage settings. But the secondary problem is thermal management, something that new builders don't quite understand.

I bought this H81 to do a cheap, low power HTPC build, which is more in-line with the intended purpose of the mobo. Also, I've been building PC's for 20+ years, so I'm dating myself when I say "a few Mhz"...should have been "a few Ghz". Smilie
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Last edited by DealHo May 4, 2016 at 09:05 PM
#15
Quote from DealHo View Post :
OK, we'll agree to disagree. I still wouldn't recommend a H81 board for OC'ing if you intend to run the PC at the overclocked speed for any length of time. If you're just experimenting and offloading, go for it. The Z87/Z97 boards have more power phases, larger heatsinks, more BIOS options (and more frequent updates), better quality components, etc - you can keep them longer without worrying about them crapping out. Long term, they have far better resale value than a H81 mobo (so you pay more up front but lose less on the back end). I've bought open box Z87/Z97 motherboards for as little as $40 AR (Microcenter FTW).

BTW, these GA-H81M-H's do limit to 1.2V, and yes, there's little chance people are going to blow the mobo using auto voltage settings. But the secondary problem is thermal management, something that new builders don't quite understand.

I bought this H81 to do a cheap, low power HTPC build, which is more in-line with the intended purpose of the mobo. Also, I've been building PC's for 20+ years, so I'm dating myself when I say "a few Mhz"...should have been "a few Ghz". Smilie
So, don''t get this for OCing a quad core, as they require more voltage to be stable?
Hmm, what would be a decent board for an I5/I7 equivalent of having the ability to do a mild OC?
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