Forum Thread

What's a good router to buy for a Cox Modem and setup questions?

shyam09 5,985 2,814 May 17, 2016 at 11:10 AM
I'm moving from ATT Uverse to Cox and thinking about the $75 - 50 Mbps plan or the $79 150 Mbps plan (both incl. voice); and planning on just buying my own router to connect to their modem.

1) Which router would you recommend for a two-story, 3900 sq. ft home? I want a good signal all throughout the house.


2) I have NAS drives, my desktop, and my printer / fax machine - all in my room which I want hardwired, so I'm guessing I'd have to connect the router to the modem, and have a switch that connects to the router, which would be in my room for my NAS drives / desktop / printer?

Since my room has a TV and phone, would it be better to move the router outside the room (like I currently plan) or just in a different corner of the room?

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#2
I don't have Cox but here is my opinion. For $4 more and triple the speed I would go with the 150Mbps in a heart beat.

I have a Netgear R7000 and have been really happy with its coverage. Most of your limitation is gonna be on the client side.

You didn't mention where your modem is gonna be. If it is in your room you can use your router for the hardwired stuff, you get 4 ports. Printer can go on wifi if you don't have enough ports and if it is capable. If not in the same location then you're right, modem to router then router to switch.

I would also consider buying your own modem and saving the rents fee. Not sure how that works since you have voice though.
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#3
Quote from shyam09 View Post :
I'm moving from ATT Uverse to Cox and thinking about the $75 - 50 Mbps plan or the $79 150 Mbps plan (both incl. voice); and planning on just buying my own router to connect to their modem.

1) Which router would you recommend for a two-story, 3900 sq. ft home? I want a good signal all throughout the house.


2) I have NAS drives, my desktop, and my printer / fax machine - all in my room which I want hardwired, so I'm guessing I'd have to connect the router to the modem, and have a switch that connects to the router, which would be in my room for my NAS drives / desktop / printer?

Since my room has a TV and phone, would it be better to move the router outside the room (like I currently plan) or just in a different corner of the room?
For 4 bucks more, 150 is a lot faster. The question is what happens when the promotional pricing ends.

Putting the router near the most wired devices makes sense. You'll get the best wifi reception is it's centrally located on the upper floor. If wifi isn't good enough, you can always run an ethernet cable, moca, or homeplug to a second router/access point on the opposite side of the house.
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#4
Quote from shyam09 View Post :
I'm moving from ATT Uverse to Cox and thinking about the $75 - 50 Mbps plan or the $79 150 Mbps plan (both incl. voice); and planning on just buying my own router to connect to their modem.

1) Which router would you recommend for a two-story, 3900 sq. ft home? I want a good signal all throughout the house.


2) I have NAS drives, my desktop, and my printer / fax machine - all in my room which I want hardwired, so I'm guessing I'd have to connect the router to the modem, and have a switch that connects to the router, which would be in my room for my NAS drives / desktop / printer?

Since my room has a TV and phone, would it be better to move the router outside the room (like I currently plan) or just in a different corner of the room?
It's unlikely you'll get a good signal throughout a house that big (do you have a basement, too?) with only 1 router. You'll likely need at least 2 (one on either side of the house), with one set up as an access point (AP) and the other providing DHCP, etc.

If your room is close to the modem, you may not need a switch. Most routers come with 4 LAN ports, so you could connect your devices directly to the router. Keep in mind that your AP (if needed) will take one, so you may need the switch anyway. 5 and 8 port switches are pretty cheap, so not too big a deal if you do.

You'll have to play around with the router location to find what gives you the best signal, and unfortunately that's a lot of trial and error.
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#5
I'm not sure where the modem will be either; but chances are it would be in my room. I have the voice plan as well, so the modem (without wifi) is free.

I'm considering either this TP-Link:
http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-AC1...B00PDLRHFW

or this Netgear:
http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-AC1...B00Z0V2NQ8

But I'm not sure which one. The first one is certainly cheaper (as of today only); and I don't think AC1750 vs. AC1900 will make a huge difference.

Custom firmware (DD-WRT) are available on both I believe; just not sure which one to go with
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#6
This question has been addressed many times and I do not feel like taking my time to do your searching for you.

You do need to know that not all routers are created equally. Federal regulations stipulate that no home wireless router exceed 1 Watt of transmit power, yet nearly all of them are capable of exceeding the 1 Watt limit.

Some ship from the manufacturer at between .5 and .75 Watts transmitter power. A few are available that come closer to that 1 watt power setting.

Nearly all of the current crop of wireless routers can be flashed with a different OS such as DD-WRT which can allow you to increase the transmitting power of your router. But be warned that DD-WRT or a similar OS cannot increase the sensitivity of the routers ability to receive signals from an extended range. Only changing to high gain antennas can do that.

I recommend that before you buy a router that you search for and spend 15 minutes reading previous discussions.
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#7
transmit power my ass

Infinity transmit power with a low gain antenna. ROFL


~~~~~~~~~~~
why not RT-AC68
seems the TP-Link only 1.7dBi antenna.
2.4G: Netgear 3.4dBi > TP-Link 2.1dBi > ASUS 1.91dBi
5G: ASUS 4.04 > Netgear 3.77 > TP-Link 1.7dBi
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Last edited by Left4Deal May 18, 2016 at 08:49 AM
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#8
Quote from dale_101798 View Post :
This question has been addressed many times and I do not feel like taking my time to do your searching for you.

You do need to know that not all routers are created equally. Federal regulations stipulate that no home wireless router exceed 1 Watt of transmit power, yet nearly all of them are capable of exceeding the 1 Watt limit.

Some ship from the manufacturer at between .5 and .75 Watts transmitter power. A few are available that come closer to that 1 watt power setting.

Nearly all of the current crop of wireless routers can be flashed with a different OS such as DD-WRT which can allow you to increase the transmitting power of your router. But be warned that DD-WRT or a similar OS cannot increase the sensitivity of the routers ability to receive signals from an extended range. Only changing to high gain antennas can do that.

I recommend that before you buy a router that you search for and spend 15 minutes reading previous discussions.
The TP-Link suggestion was because of the recent SD thread, and the Netgear was something I came across myself. I spent a few hours yesterday comparing a few of the AC1750 and AC1900 routers on smallnetbuilder, and even the previous generations of the Netgear, and finally the Netgear router would be a good fit.

Thank you everyone for the tips and suggestions.
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