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2-Years of Private Internet Access VPN Service $59.95 (New Customers Only)

longmanj9 4,769 59,616 May 24, 2016 at 09:11 PM in Internet & Websites (5) More Private Internet Access Deals
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Last Edited by cricket702 May 31, 2016 at 10:42 AM
Private Internet Access

Private Internet Access is having their Memorial Day Sale:Note, this is valid for 24-months (approximately $2.50/month)

Features:
  • Secure VPN Account
  • Encrypted WiFi
  • P2P and VoIP Support
  • PPTP, OpenVPN and L2TP/IPSec
  • 5 Devices Simultaneously
  • Multiple VPN Gateways
  • Unlimited Bandwidth
  • SOCKS5 Proxy Included
  • No traffic logs
  • Instant Setup
For reviews on this service refer to PC Magazine [pcmag.com] and Best VPN [bestvpn.com].
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35 Comments

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#3
Word of caution to new users. I've been using PIA for a little while now to bypass Verizon limitations on my broadband. Over the last six months to a year, I've had more and more problems with sites blocking me because of my PIA IP address. Some sites like Papa John's would just give me a phony "under maintenance" page. Other sites like Samsung.com permanently blacklisted name address and payment methods when I tried to order (so even trying again without PIA failed). Financial institutions and online stores are also cracking down.

This isn't unique to PIA, but they don't appear to be taking it very seriously. The problem is that since people regularly use anonymous VPNs for malicious purposes, sites are blacklisting/blocking entire IP ranges from the VPNs for protection.

The logical course would be to just not use the VPN for sites that don't like it, but it can be a hassle to turn on and off - especially when implemented in your router rather than on each PC. On a router level, you can bypass the VPN for specific sites, but it requires a lot of maintenance. Additionally, in cases like Samsung, once they flag you, it's over and doesn't matter that you switch back to your standard IP and by the time you know, it's too late.

As another example, I accidentally had PIA active when I attempted to apply for a Bank of America checking account. Now I've been told even via phone that I'm not eligible for any banking products with them.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ss...ss+blocked
Reply Helpful Comment? 10 0
Last edited by brenth77 May 24, 2016 at 10:48 PM
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#4
Quote from brenth77 View Post :
Word of caution to new users. I've been using PIA for a little while now to bypass Verizon limitations on my broadband. Over the last six months to a year, I've had more and more problems with sites blocking me because of my PIA IP address. Some sites like Papa John's would just give me a phony "under maintenance" page. Other sites like Samsung.com permanently blacklisted name address and payment methods when I tried to order (so even trying again without PIA failed). Financial institutions and online stores are also cracking down.

This isn't unique to PIA, but they don't appear to be taking it very seriously. The problem is that since people regularly use anonymous VPNs for malicious purposes, sites are blacklisting/blocking entire IP ranges from the VPNs for protection.

The logical course would be to just not use the VPN for sites that don't like it, but it can be a hassle to turn on and off - especially when implemented in your router rather than on each PC. On a router level, you can bypass the VPN for specific sites, but it requires a lot of maintenance. Additionally, in cases like Samsung, once they flag you, it's over and doesn't matter that you switch back to your standard IP and by the time you know, it's too late.

As another example, I accidentally had PIA active when I attempted to apply for a Bank of America checking account. Now I've been told even via phone that I'm not eligible for any banking products with them.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ss...ss+blocked
Online banking with a vpn is a great way to get the accounts temporarily shut down and a real hassle to get them up and running again and I'm sure it's the same way with any kind of financial institution as it sets off a fraud alert
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 1
#5
PureVPN: 2 Years VPN Subscription for the Price of 1, $2.08/m

https://www.purevpn.com/
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 2
Last edited by JoeG5891 May 25, 2016 at 11:42 PM
#6
I've been running into this issue as well... the odd one is the amazon camel price checking site.. why would they ban VPN use?

also, I made a mistake once of using my bing account via VPN... got banned when trying to redeem a gift card.
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#7
I've been using PIA for about 5 years now at home and while traveling.

I have never been banned. Only temporary "this IP is blocked" message and disconnecting VPN and reconnect to another different node solves the problem immediately.

People do stupid stuff behind the IP. It's bad business to permanently ban IP blocks. Temp blocks are the normal way they are handled.
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Last edited by G37 May 25, 2016 at 04:20 AM
#8
I love PIA. Thinking about cancelling my existing service and starting as a new customer.
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#9
Quote from brenth77 View Post :
Word of caution to new users. I've been using PIA for a little while now to bypass Verizon limitations on my broadband. Over the last six months to a year, I've had more and more problems with sites blocking me because of my PIA IP address. Some sites like Papa John's would just give me a phony "under maintenance" page. Other sites like Samsung.com permanently blacklisted name address and payment methods when I tried to order (so even trying again without PIA failed). Financial institutions and online stores are also cracking down.

This isn't unique to PIA, but they don't appear to be taking it very seriously. The problem is that since people regularly use anonymous VPNs for malicious purposes, sites are blacklisting/blocking entire IP ranges from the VPNs for protection.

The logical course would be to just not use the VPN for sites that don't like it, but it can be a hassle to turn on and off - especially when implemented in your router rather than on each PC. On a router level, you can bypass the VPN for specific sites, but it requires a lot of maintenance. Additionally, in cases like Samsung, once they flag you, it's over and doesn't matter that you switch back to your standard IP and by the time you know, it's too late.

As another example, I accidentally had PIA active when I attempted to apply for a Bank of America checking account. Now I've been told even via phone that I'm not eligible for any banking products with them.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ss...ss+blocked
Thanks for the warning.

I've been using PIA for about 4 years and besides Craigslist not allowing use while on a VPN, I've never had any business ban me or not allow me to use their website. Chase does ask me infrequently to verify by getting a texted code and entering it while logging on. However, I don't have it setup in my router but rather I connect each time I get in my computer.

If a business blocked me because of VPN use, it would be a guarantee that I then buy from their competitor and proceed to not use that company's products. If someone doesn't want my business, I'll gladly oblige their request take my business elsewhere. I think if enough people stand up for their rights and take their business elsewhere, companies might think twice before blocking VPN use
Reply Helpful Comment? 4 0

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#10
Quote from OneEyedWillie View Post :
Online banking with a vpn is a great way to get the accounts temporarily shut down and a real hassle to get them up and running again and I'm sure it's the same way with any kind of financial institution as it sets off a fraud alert
This seems counter-intuitive. I would think that financial institutions would want the extra security that a VPN provides when you access your account via a public wifi point. Seems like it would be better to me if all financial institutions REQUIRED 2-factor authentication via a cell phone or authenticator device.

If I am accessing my bank from Gogo inflight, you better believe I'm going through a VPN!
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Last edited by OB_Bull May 25, 2016 at 07:02 AM
#11
I have a raspberry pi setup as an OpenVPN server at home. my android and apple products have the OpenVPN app installed. When I turn them on, my internet traffic gets tunneled to my home router, and then out to the internet. No monthly or annual fees.
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#12
Quote from GeorgeMcFly View Post :
I've been running into this issue as well... the odd one is the amazon camel price checking site.. why would they ban VPN use?
I think for a lot of sites, it may be done at the hosting-level. Meaning their provider does the blocking. With Samsung, it was their store provider - DigitalRiver. I'd say Samsung had no idea.

Quote from G37 View Post :
People do stupid stuff behind the IP. It's bad business to permanently ban IP blocks. Temp blocks are the normal way they are handled.
Exactly. I think that's the problem. PIA and others sell the VPN service as a security measure for normal users (which it can be and is), but probably a large part of the usage is for questionable activities.

Quote from khalid7412002 View Post :
If a business blocked me because of VPN use, it would be a guarantee that I then buy from their competitor and proceed to not use that company's products. If someone doesn't want my business, I'll gladly oblige their request take my business elsewhere. I think if enough people stand up for their rights and take their business elsewhere, companies might think twice before blocking VPN use
As I said above, I imagine that a lot of the companies don't even know it's happening or, if they do, are just sold on the idea by IT people who either don't mention or don't realize the negative side-effects. What CEO or VP wouldn't think it was great if IT came and told them they found a way to wipe out 99% of fraud attempts or something.

Quote from OB_Bull View Post :
This seems counter-intuitive. I would think that financial institutions would want the extra security that a VPN provides when you access your account via a public wifi point. Seems like it would be better to me if all financial institutions REQUIRED 2-factor authentication via a cell phone or authenticator device.
Obviously the security aspect is a good thing from everyone's perspective, and that's how PIA and others sell the product. The anonymity is what they're afraid of. I would prefer if PIA offered the VPN service with unique, static IPs.

Quote from phil21080 View Post :
I have a raspberry pi setup as an OpenVPN server at home. my android and apple products have the OpenVPN app installed. When I turn them on, my internet traffic gets tunneled to my home router, and then out to the internet. No monthly or annual fees.
This is definitely the way to go if security (rather than anonymity) is the goal - like it is for most. I wasn't able to do this because Verizon doesn't provide a routable IP when I connect. They've got multiple levels of NAT, so the IP I get when connecting is another internal IP on their network. So, even with dynamic DNS, just no reaching from the outside. What I did instead was get some cheap VPS servers from places like Cloud@Cost and Sentris and set up OpenVPN servers on them. Then I run pfsense and OpenVPN clients to route all my traffic through those rather than through PIA. Helping, so far.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by brenth77 May 25, 2016 at 07:56 AM
#13
Quote from brenth77 View Post :
Word of caution to new users. I've been using PIA for a little while now to bypass Verizon limitations on my broadband. Over the last six months to a year, I've had more and more problems with sites blocking me because of my PIA IP address. Some sites like Papa John's would just give me a phony "under maintenance" page. Other sites like Samsung.com permanently blacklisted name address and payment methods when I tried to order (so even trying again without PIA failed). Financial institutions and online stores are also cracking down.

This isn't unique to PIA, but they don't appear to be taking it very seriously. The problem is that since people regularly use anonymous VPNs for malicious purposes, sites are blacklisting/blocking entire IP ranges from the VPNs for protection.

The logical course would be to just not use the VPN for sites that don't like it, but it can be a hassle to turn on and off - especially when implemented in your router rather than on each PC. On a router level, you can bypass the VPN for specific sites, but it requires a lot of maintenance. Additionally, in cases like Samsung, once they flag you, it's over and doesn't matter that you switch back to your standard IP and by the time you know, it's too late.

As another example, I accidentally had PIA active when I attempted to apply for a Bank of America checking account. Now I've been told even via phone that I'm not eligible for any banking products with them.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ss...ss+blocked [google.com]
Thanks for the warning. I've been seriously looking for a VPN service recently. I was ready to pounce on this deal until I saw your post. My main priority is security. I guess I can achieve that by running my own VPN server. Nevertheless, I have strong feelings about obtaining anonymity online. I wish generally people would adopt encrypted communication to alleviate the idea that it is only used for nefarious purposes. I guess I'm going to have to pass on this while I decide how I am going to proceed.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#14
Quote from brenth77 View Post :
Obviously the security aspect is a good thing from everyone's perspective, and that's how PIA and others sell the product. The anonymity is what they're afraid of. I would prefer if PIA offered the VPN service with unique, static IPs.
Only, there is no anonymity. You are logging into the financial institution with your credentials. That is why 2-factor authentication is important. Someone with your password cannot impersonate you without your second factor (cell phone etc.).

If it were as simple as using an anonymous ip for a hacker, the criminal could use a public hotspot to hack a bank account and still remain anonymous. With good security, an anonymous ip address should not matter.

I would be more concerned with logging into my bank using a public hotspot and my credentials being compromised. A hacker could then theoretically even use the exact same public hotspot to access my account and still remain anonymous.

I think 2-factor authentication and secure communications are much more important than forensically trying to track down an ip address after a security breach has already occurred.

A VPN server running in my home would be better perhaps, but I am not inclined to build one and PIA is convenient.
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#15
Quote from OB_Bull View Post :
Only, there is no anonymity. You are logging into the financial institution with your credentials. That is why 2-factor authentication is important. Someone with your password cannot impersonate you without your second factor (cell phone etc.).

If it were as simple as using an anonymous ip for a hacker, the criminal could use a public hotspot to hack a bank account and still remain anonymous. With good security, an anonymous ip address should not matter.

I would be more concerned with logging into my bank using a public hotspot and my credentials being compromised. A hacker could then theoretically even use the exact same public hotspot to access my account and still remain anonymous.

I think 2-factor authentication and secure communications are much more important than forensically trying to track down an ip address after a security breach has already occurred.

A VPN server running in my home would be better perhaps, but I am not inclined to build one and PIA is convenient.
I agree with you completely. I just meant that the motive for the companies (or their It people) blocking the VPNs is the IP masking/anonymity rather than the additional encryption provided by the tunnel.

It may not even be that these companies or sites have even been targeted by anyone at these IPs. It's completely possible that they're just relying on someone providing lists of "high-risk" IP ranges.
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