Forum Thread

Puzzling SSD Tests with Older Computers

aznnp77 1,876 265 June 13, 2016 at 07:48 AM
So I was trying to help a friend out with his computer and upgrading him to an SSD. I've upgraded a few of them by now, and the difference has been dramatic as far as boot times and opening of applications.

This has included two 2008ish Core 2 Duo 3.0 ghz (E8400) desktops, and my mother's 2011 Samsung laptop with a B950 dual core processor. . In installed an Evo 850 in both the desktops, and a Sandisk SSD plus in the laptop. These installs went pretty well.

On the desktops, the desktops, the computer finishes booting after the Windows 7 "pieces" have just touched. On the Samsung laptop, the pieces get 1/2 to 3/4 of the way touching, then it boots.

So this Toshiba laptop is no more than a year older than the Samsung laptop. It has a P6200 2.13ghz processor, and the benchmarks are very close to the B950. I think it's like 1700 to 1600 or something.

I bought the ADATA SP550 240gb for this computer, and installed all the drivers. This includes the Intel Rapid Storage Driver, the AHCI driver, the chipset driver, and all the correct stuff. I've done this a couple of times now. Well on this computer, the Windows 7 pieces come together, then it hangs for another 5 seconds, then boots. The computer boots up in 20-25 seconds, which isn't terrible, but wayyyy slower than the older desktops and the Samsung. Chrome takes 2-3 seconds to load as well. It's not instant like it is with the other computers.

So I bought another Sandisk SSD plus just to compare. The Sandisk actually feels a tiny bit faster. It only hangs for 4 seconds rather than 5, and Chrome seems to open in 1-2 seconds, rather than 2-3.

I've benchmarked both drives, and the Sandisk has a slightly better Sequential read, but the ADATA has better random reads. Random reads are supposed to be what makes the computer boot faster supposedly.

For kicks, I tried the Sandisk drive in my Lenovo laptop, which is about the same age as the Samsung from before (B940), and it booted halfway through the pieces coming together. After doing a full restore, it took until the pieces colliding again.

Sequential reads were 500 on the benchmark, so I'm thinking okay this computer has SATA 3 then. But the sequential write was 200, which was the same as on SATA 2.

So yeah, I don't get it. Is there something wrong with my ADATA drive? Is there something I can do to make the Toshiba faster?

The ADATA has really slow write speeds, but that doesn't really matter for a computer that just does web browsing right?

I've attached an image with the 3 benches.

5 Comments

1

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

Joined Aug 2005
L10: Grand Master
12,661 Posts
4,824 Reputation
Pro
#2
Are you cloning the OS every time you do this or are these fresh installs? If cloning what are you using?

Have you made sure all the drives have the latest firmware and computers have the latest bios?

Have you compared your numbers on the Adata to known reviews of it? http://www.anandtech.com/show/101...ssd-review
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Vague questions receive vague answers . . . . . .
#3
You do realized that using the graphics output of Windows booting up as a measure of time is sort of lame?

That being said, different machines from different manufacturers with different components will have different interfaces and drivers and associated installed software so one can not expect boot and load times to be comparable in the manner you are analyzing them. Add in performance differences between the different SSD makes and the associated configuration changes that may vary (indexing service off, pagefile moved to secondary hard drive, etc). Samsung has their Magician software which will give you performance numbers for sequential and random reads and writes. I would think Adata has the same. Use those as a means for comparison. Anything beyond that there are simply too many variables in play.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Joined Sep 2008
Customer Service Slave
1,876 Posts
265 Reputation
Original Poster
#4
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Are you cloning the OS every time you do this or are these fresh installs? If cloning what are you using?

Have you made sure all the drives have the latest firmware and computers have the latest bios?

Have you compared your numbers on the Adata to known reviews of it? http://www.anandtech.com/show/101...ssd-review
Fresh installs every time, using Windows 7 disc, not Toshiba recovery software.

I used ADATA SSD utility to verify latest firmware and to "TRIM" it. The bios has the latest version from the web site, and the latest chipset driver, along with Intel Rapid Storage Driver.

I read a lot of reviews about the SP550 before I bought it. It was Tom's Hardware best value drive I believe. Your link shows the manufacturer's specs.

According to SSD Benchmark, my hard drive was benching in the bottom 1% for most of the time I was using it. I managed to get into the bottom 3% on my last bench.

Am I correct that Random (4k) read is the most important thing for fast boots and general snappiness of applications opening? This computer is used strictly for internet browsing, youtube, etc.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Last edited by aznnp77 June 13, 2016 at 11:36 AM
You can swear by your refurbished stuff all you want, but I have first-hand experience, and would NEVER buy anything refurbished.

Why do you think refurbished stuff is so cheap? The manufacturer gets defective products returned and unload them to 3rd party vendors cheap who try to entice you at 20% discount off retail.
Joined Sep 2008
Customer Service Slave
1,876 Posts
265 Reputation
Original Poster
#5
Quote from YanksIn2009 View Post :
You do realized that using the graphics output of Windows booting up as a measure of time is sort of lame?

That being said, different machines from different manufacturers with different components will have different interfaces and drivers and associated installed software so one can not expect boot and load times to be comparable in the manner you are analyzing them. Add in performance differences between the different SSD makes and the associated configuration changes that may vary (indexing service off, pagefile moved to secondary hard drive, etc). Samsung has their Magician software which will give you performance numbers for sequential and random reads and writes. I would think Adata has the same. Use those as a means for comparison. Anything beyond that there are simply too many variables in play.
Why is it lame if every Windows 7 computer must go through that standard process unless you change the settings?

Okay, well it takes between 19-25 seconds to boot, including the initial Toshiba bios screen that takes about 1-2 seconds.

I went into msconfig and disabled everything except the intel utilities and the AV. I also changed timeout setting to 3.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
#6
Quote from aznnp77 View Post :
Why is it lame if every Windows 7 computer must go through that standard process unless you change the settings?

Okay, well it takes between 19-25 seconds to boot, including the initial Toshiba bios screen that takes about 1-2 seconds.

I went into msconfig and disabled everything except the intel utilities and the AV. I also changed timeout setting to 3.
He's saying that there are too many variables to just use the graphics in the loading screen as a measurement. Boot time loading is better but don't compare them between systems but before and after the ssd. Compare it to itself.

For example, your bios could be setup differently. One may have a "fast boot" mode turned on or the drive is set to IDE mode (or RAID) instead of AHCI. Again, lots of variables between machines.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
Page 1 of 1
1
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 
Copyright 1999 - 2016. Slickdeals, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Copyright / Infringement Policy  •  Privacy Policy  •  Terms of Service  •  Acceptable Use Policy (Rules)  •  Interest-Based Ads
Link Copied to Clipboard