Forum Thread

bad Seagate hdd

sd0209 237 30 July 18, 2016 at 01:44 PM
so i bought a Seagate 5tb drive on a creditcard to get the extra warranty and lo and behold i'm going to need it.
this thing been giving me trouble for months, goes offline
when i give it much work to do smart command fails in diagnsotic.

i checked the serial for warranty at first it was good then later i checked again it expired. since i bought it in August i called seagate emailed them a receipt and they extended the warrany for a month.

HOWEVER i been reading up on these seagate and seems everybody is unhappy with their new models and i know they will send me a "recertified" which actually means REPEAT so i'm thinking i would rather find a westernD drive and considering just waiting and let the warranty run out and claim it thru the creditcard company but this would be my first warranty extension claim thru the card company.

any holes in that plan?

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#2
Might be, since Seagate offered to replace it.
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#3
Quote from sd0209 View Post :
so i bought a Seagate 5tb drive on a creditcard to get the extra warranty and lo and behold i'm going to need it.
this thing been giving me trouble for months, goes offline
when i give it much work to do smart command fails in diagnsotic.

i checked the serial for warranty at first it was good then later i checked again it expired. since i bought it in August i called seagate emailed them a receipt and they extended the warrany for a month.

HOWEVER i been reading up on these seagate and seems everybody is unhappy with their new models and i know they will send me a "recertified" which actually means REPEAT so i'm thinking i would rather find a westernD drive and considering just waiting and let the warranty run out and claim it thru the creditcard company but this would be my first warranty extension claim thru the card company.

any holes in that plan?
If it was me I would take the Seagate replacement drive first. Recertified does not mean you wil lhave a problem 100% of the time. I have a receftified drive that was a replacement from a warranty that I am using right now and it's been fine for over a year. Not all seagate drives are bad, they may have some models or generations that have more problems than others but it's not universal. Keep good backup too, no data should ever be in only one place.

Keep records so if you have to go to the credit card company you can. go to them if you need. Personally never gone through a credit card warranty before so i don't know what all they need but I assume they require you go work with the manufacture first if it's an option.
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#4
BackBlaze.com found these annualized failure rates from 2013 to to 2016 1Q. Notice that Western Digital hasn't fared much better than Seagate, and failure rates have varied by model, from about 1% to 10%:



"Recertified" means anything because there are no legal or industry-wide standards for the term. The drives can be anything from unused returns from distributors or retailers to well-used products that just happen to dyo;; have enough spare sectors left that the bad sectors can be substituted.

Back around 2000 or earlier, WD said in one of its forums that refurbished drives were practically new except for the aluminum casting, and even it was stripped and given a new nonstick coating. I don't remember if the heads were replaced, but the bearings and platters were. But when I asked several manufactures just a few years ago about refurbishment, the closest any of them gave to specifics was WD saying a drive that had accoumulated "something like 25,000 hours" would not be sent out as refurbished or recertified.

Typically credit card warranties require that you get a written repair estimate, or they'll reimburse you for a replacement product that you first have to buy. A friend of mine had problems getting coverage from Mastercard over a $50 HD that failed. They wanted him to provide a written estimate from a repair shop and didn't care that it would cost more than $50 and wouldn't be reimbursed. Mastercard finally said they'd reimburse him if he shipped the HD to them. Generally Visa and Amex are much better; I haven't tried Discover.
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#5
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
If it was me I would take the Seagate replacement drive first. Recertified does not mean you wil lhave a problem 100% of the time. I have a receftified drive that was a replacement from a warranty that I am using right now and it's been fine for over a year. Not all seagate drives are bad, they may have some models or generations that have more problems than others but it's not universal. Keep good backup too, no data should ever be in only one place.

Keep records so if you have to go to the credit card company you can. go to them if you need. Personally never gone through a credit card warranty before so i don't know what all they need but I assume they require you go work with the manufacture first if it's an option.
Ditto. Take the replacement drive. Getting a reimbursement from a CC company is at best a paperwork pita and at worst a nightmare and not going through the manufacturer when there was a known issue may be grounds for them to deny the claim, If it were me, I would get the refurb drive and not open it when it arrives and sell it for whatever I can get as a refurb on Ebay. Then go out and buy a WD drive.

In my experience, Seagate has the rep it deserves. All drives will eventually fail, but there is reason why Seagate is always the cheapest. If it is important data and\or you need performance, get a WD Black drive imo. A WD Blue can also be used to save some money if appropriate. If it is just for general storage, grab a newer model WD Green.

http://www.gamersnexus.net/guides...for-gaming
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#6
Quote from larrymoencurly View Post :
BackBlaze.com found these annualized failure rates from 2013 to to 2016 1Q. Notice that Western Digital hasn't fared much better than Seagate, and failure rates have varied by model, from about 1% to 10%:



"Recertified" means anything because there are no legal or industry-wide standards for the term. The drives can be anything from unused returns from distributors or retailers to well-used products that just happen to dyo;; have enough spare sectors left that the bad sectors can be substituted.

Back around 2000 or earlier, WD said in one of its forums that refurbished drives were practically new except for the aluminum casting, and even it was stripped and given a new nonstick coating. I don't remember if the heads were replaced, but the bearings and platters were. But when I asked several manufactures just a few years ago about refurbishment, the closest any of them gave to specifics was WD saying a drive that had accoumulated "something like 25,000 hours" would not be sent out as refurbished or recertified.

Typically credit card warranties require that you get a written repair estimate, or they'll reimburse you for a replacement product that you first have to buy. A friend of mine had problems getting coverage from Mastercard over a $50 HD that failed. They wanted him to provide a written estimate from a repair shop and didn't care that it would cost more than $50 and wouldn't be reimbursed. Mastercard finally said they'd reimburse him if he shipped the HD to them. Generally Visa and Amex are much better; I haven't tried Discover.
Those BB stats are not terribly useful. The fact that we see a massive drop in Seagate failure rates is evidence of the fact in BB's testing. Long story short, BB bought a ton of Seagate drives right after the Taiwanese floods and then deployed them in a pod system that they would later refine. I'm far more worried about WD's track record considering they've basically blacklisted the Green/Blue drives because of the aggressive drive head parking and they're still seeing these bad failure rates.
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#7
Quote from YanksIn2009 View Post :
Ditto. Take the replacement drive. Getting a reimbursement from a CC company is at best a paperwork pita and at worst a nightmare and not going through the manufacturer when there was a known issue may be grounds for them to deny the claim, If it were me, I would get the refurb drive and not open it when it arrives and sell it for whatever I can get as a refurb on Ebay. Then go out and buy a WD drive.

In my experience, Seagate has the rep it deserves. All drives will eventually fail, but there is reason why Seagate is always the cheapest. If it is important data and\or you need performance, get a WD Black drive imo. A WD Blue can also be used to save some money if appropriate. If it is just for general storage, grab a newer model WD Green.

http://www.gamersnexus.net/guides...for-gaming [gamersnexus.net]
Do NOT buy WD blue or green drives. The green drives do some aggressive head parking bull that adds wear to the drives and leads to pre-mature failure. The reputation of them got so bad that WD literally just started slapping blue labels on them. The old WD blue which were very solid drives have not been produced in quantities larger than 1TB.

There are no safe hard drives. If you don't want them to fail, buy more drives and back them up. 99.9% of the time, the average person would be better off with two cheap drives over a single WD black and you would be delusional if you thought otherwise.
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Last edited by Jep4444 July 24, 2016 at 09:41 AM
#8
Take the replacement drive. My only experience with a drive dying during the warranty period was with a Seagate 500 MB IDE drive. Replacement is finishing up year 3 and still problem-free.
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#9
Quote from Jep4444 View Post :
Those BB stats are not terribly useful. The fact that we see a massive drop in Seagate failure rates is evidence of the fact in BB's testing. Long story short, BB bought a ton of Seagate drives right after the Taiwanese floods and then deployed them in a pod system that they would later refine. I'm far more worried about WD's track record considering they've basically blacklisted the Green/Blue drives because of the aggressive drive head parking and they're still seeing these bad failure rates.
Unfortunately nobody else has released such information to the public, and Seagate is 4 years late in its promised response to BB. But apparently Seagate's reliability improved greatly starting with their 4TB, 5900 RPM model, not only according to BB but also something I read from one of the data recovery experts at HDDguru.com. I haven't found any explanations why certain drives fail more than others. Is it design, assembly, dust in the factory, or materials? Russia's StorLab said some designs were prone to the spindle shaft getting stuck (Seagates since the 7200.12 are supposed to be highly resistant to this), and another place blamed Seagate for once using a soft platter coating/lubricant that built up on heads, but that was with old designs that parked the heads on the platters, rather than lift them away. One person, Franc Zabkar, said Western Digitals had a weak protection for the electronics because the overvoltage crowbars weren't connected directly enough to ground.
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#10
I will recommend Spinrite [grc.com] Spinrite is not free but if it doesn't completely cure your hard drive troubles Steve Gibson will happily refund your money.

There is no downside to trying it, no matter what others here say Spinrite works and it works very well.

Take a few seconds and listen to Steve explain it. He is very entertaining.
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