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Jet.com Discounts, Deals and Coupon Codes

Stone Design Fire Pit Outdoor Home Patio Gas Firepit - $106.20 + FS - New Jet.com Customers

Chewyp0rk 980 2,312 August 27, 2016 at 11:47 AM in Home & Home Improvement (5) More Jet.com Deals
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$106.20

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https://jet.com/product/Stone-Des...as-Firepit

For new customers, add to cart and use code TRIPLE15 to get 15% off your first 3 orders. The total should drop to $106.20.

Alternatively, you can get it from Amazon for $124.95 + FS:
https://www.amazon.com/exec/obido...B015JLUESC
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5 Comments

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#2
This thing is 28" wide total. It is REALLY small. Just an FYI.
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#3
how about building your own?

anyone have link or idea for doing similar outdoor firepit that has gas hookup and gas controls?
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#4
Quote from intelinside View Post :
how about building your own?

anyone have link or idea for doing similar outdoor firepit that has gas hookup and gas controls?
I built my own wood fire pit. I assume they would be similar, but I just sort of made it up as I went. Biggest thing I learned was that you cannot use poly glue to glue the bricks, even if the poly says it's for fireplaces. I ended up having to scrape the burnt glue off and reattaching them with mortar. We got a LOT of use out of it up until we sold our house recently.
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#5
Quote from CodeChimp View Post :
I built my own wood fire pit. I assume they would be similar, but I just sort of made it up as I went. Biggest thing I learned was that you cannot use poly glue to glue the bricks, even if the poly says it's for fireplaces. I ended up having to scrape the burnt glue off and reattaching them with mortar. We got a LOT of use out of it up until we sold our house recently.

Do you think the materials cost less?
Thanks I'll just do it with mortar-- seems stronger that way too
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#6
Quote from intelinside View Post :
Do you think the materials cost less?
Thanks I'll just do it with mortar-- seems stronger that way too
The fire pit part was about $80 total, $65 of which was the block, the rest the other various materials (sand, gravel, glue, and cement). I used the smaller wall bricks from Lowes. Something similar to this [lowes.com]. It may even be that one specific, but I just know it was one of the smaller retaining wall blocks and cost me about $1 each.

My process was this:
  1. Level out area
  2. Dig out circle where put would be, down about 12" down
  3. Fill with rocks and sand (standard proceedure for pavers)...make sure it's level and packed
  4. Place a row of 13 bricks for the first row
  5. Repeat for a total of 5 rows, staggering the rows so each block splits the gaps in the one below...this is where you want to mortar them together

You end up using like 65 blocks, 78 if you want 6 rows. You can adjust each level to 12 if you want a slightly smaller diameter to your pit. I originally intended on putting a different decorative stone/block top on it, but I never got around to it.

Once the pit was together I ended up digging out the center, filling with about 10"-12" pea gravel, and pouring concrete sloped to the center with a 6" piece of PVC in the middle for drainage. The drain worked only for a bit, as it ends up packing in with ash from the wood fire, which solidifies as it gets wet and turns into something like clay. I am not sure if I would do the concrete again, TBH. My original thought was that it would prevent weeds and make scooping out the ash easier, which it did, but keeping the drain cleared was somewhat of a slight pain. If I hadn't done the concrete bottom I would have had to worry about digging out the pit too much when I scooped out the ash, and ultimately worry about the walls of the pit caving in, so maybe it was worth the trouble. If you end up using a gas flame you would not have to worry about that as much. Just run the pipes for the gas into the pit first, do your walls, then concrete the bottom with a drain.

After the put was done, I put pavers around. The area was about 12x12 total, with custom concrete block corners for my wife's herb garden. I used smaller 4x8x16 concrete blocks [lowes.com] for the corner planers, and those were mortared and had concrete filled into the holes to prevent movement (of course, standard 10"-12" bed of gravel packed for the foundation). I topped it off with retaining wall pavers in blue, which I mortared to the concrete blocks and glued to each other using Liquid Nails concrete glue.

The only part I didn't do gravel base was the pavers, which I ended up using these 2x3' foam boards [lowes.com]. They were pricey, but by the time I got to the pavers I was tired of digging out so much, and figured I'd probably spend just as much for the gravel and sand to fill the area as the boards. With the foam boards, I think you only needed like a 1/2" sand base, but it's written right on the boards. Once the pavers were down I applied a polymeric sand, which Home Depot had much cheaper than Lowes (same brand, about 1/2 as much at the time).

Biggest things I learned on the whole project:
  1. Pavers are the most expensive part of the project. In total I figured I was about $800 or more into it, most of which were the pavers and materials for the pavers
  2. Mortar the fire pit blocks. You don't need a lot, just treat it like glue (unless you want mortar lines like bricks have)
  3. The foam board was VERY expensive, in the long run, but worth it in the decreased labor IMHO
  4. Even in Central Florida, we used our fire pit WAY more than I anticipated. Originally the purpose was the herb gardens, and the firepit was just "decoration"
  5. For the pavers and planters, you will need a decent wet saw that can cut a 2.5" block. I ended up buying a Rigid wet saw that I LOVE, and have used for several other projects since.

Sorry for the long post. I wanted to get all the details I could.
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