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4 TB WD Purple 3.5" SATA III 5400 RPM Surveillance HDD for $129.99 AC, 6 TB Seagate NAS HDD 3.5" SATA III 7200 RPM Internal HDD for $219.99 AC & More @ Newegg.com

TDMVP73 24,289 101,897 August 29, 2016 at 12:23 AM in 3.5" Hard Drives (9) More Newegg Deals
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Last Edited by jersharocks September 2, 2016 at 08:03 AM
Hey guys,

I didn't see this posted, so I thought I'd share.

Internal 3.5" Desktop Hard Drives:SHELL SHOCKER DEAL: The 6 TB Seagate NAS HDD sale price is valid from 12:01 AM PT to 11:59 PM PT on Wednesday, August 31st, 2016.External Desktop USB 3.0 Hard Drives:
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Last Edited by TDMVP73 August 31, 2016 at 01:05 AM
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#3
Not bad, but not very slick
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#4
Additional HDD Available:

SHELL SHOCKER DEAL: The 6 TB Seagate NAS HDD sale price is valid from 12:01 AM PT to 11:59 PM PT on Wednesday, August 31st, 2016.
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#5
Will this work on a ps4
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#6
Not sure why people don't prefer things like these White Label drives from Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UCP11U6

6TB for 150 bucks. These are generally just OEM WD Red drives. The only difference is the label and a 1 year warranty instead of a 2 or 3 year warranty. Honestly if you're RAID'ing them you're better off with more of the cheaper drives and just replace them as necessary.

Five of the 6TB Seagates @ 220/each is 1100

Six of the 6TB White label @ 150/each is 900

you save 200 dollars and get an extra parity drive or hot spare.

If you only need one drive and you're not in a RAID then you might prefer the 'safety' of the name brand and warranty but you lose your data either way with a failure, who cares at that point if it's covered under warranty your data is still gone.
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#7
Red drives, black drives, green drives, white drives, and now purple drives!

If I install an array of drives in different colors do I get a pot of gold!?
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#8
Quote from shastada View Post :
Not sure why people don't prefer things like these White Label drives from Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00UCP11U6

6TB for 150 bucks. These are generally just OEM WD Red drives. The only difference is the label and a 1 year warranty instead of a 2 or 3 year warranty. Honestly if you're RAID'ing them you're better off with more of the cheaper drives and just replace them as necessary.

Five of the 6TB Seagates @ 220/each is 1100

Six of the 6TB White label @ 150/each is 900

you save 200 dollars and get an extra parity drive or hot spare.

If you only need one drive and you're not in a RAID then you might prefer th hie 'safety' of the name brand and warranty but you lose your data either way with a failure, who cares at that point if it's covere nod under warranty your data is still gone.
last I heard these are cheap Chinese crap drives. saving $25 and buying crap isn't something I'd do. I can't confirm that though.

heck I was even concerned about putting some new WD 4tb red drives in one of my synology nas boxes because even wd sucks these days. id love to save money but I'm going back to Hitachi in a couple of months. I can't see trusting my data to drives like this..
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Last edited by xcopy August 31, 2016 at 07:07 PM
#9
Quote from xcopy View Post :
last I heard these are cheap Chinese crap drives. saving $25 and buying crap isn't something I'd do. I can't confirm that though.

heck I was even concerned about putting some new WD 4tb red drives in one of my synology nas boxes because even wd sucks these days. id love to save money but I'm going back to Hitachi in a couple of months. I can't see trusting my data to drives like this..
Hitachi is one company I'm never going back to. Too many drives lost to them. I'll go back to paper first.
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#10
Quote from xcopy View Post :
last I heard these are cheap Chinese crap drives. saving $25 and buying crap isn't something I'd do. I can't confirm that though.

heck I was even concerned about putting some new WD 4tb red drives in one of my synology nas boxes because even wd sucks these days. id love to save money but I'm going back to Hitachi in a couple of months. I can't see trusting my data to drives like this..
There are only so many hard drive manufacturers. These are just OEM white label drives. They are literally the same as the original drive just with different warranty and potentially custom firmware. there are no mystery Chinese hard drive manufacturers out there.
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#11
Quote from xcopy View Post :
last I heard these are cheap Chinese crap drives. saving $25 and buying crap isn't something I'd do. I can't confirm that though.

heck I was even concerned about putting some new WD 4tb red drives in one of my synology nas boxes because even wd sucks these days. id love to save money but I'm going back to Hitachi in a couple of months. I can't see trusting my data to drives like this..
isn't Hitachi (hgst) owned by WD?
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#12
Quote from shastada View Post :
There are only so many hard drive manufacturers. These are just OEM white label drives. They are literally the same as the original drive just with different warranty and potentially custom firmware. there are no mystery Chinese hard drive manufacturers out there.

I actually don't know much about them, but I've read these "white label" drives (maybe not these exact ones) come from chinese drive manufacturers, not WD/Seagate/et. al, but there are purportedly other, non aligned, chinese mfgs.

One of the reason seagate drives have been such pieces of shlt for the last 6+ years is because they moved "production", or really just responsibility, to china and it didn't go well.

Anyway, I'd but these if I knew who made them, and if they had a decent warranty. Risking $600 to have it all come crashing down in 13 months is too rich for my blood. I could just buy seagate on sale and get the same result (disaster) anyway. Wink

https://panjiva.com/Chinese-Manuf.../hard+disc
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#13
Quote from xcopy View Post :
last I heard these are cheap Chinese crap drives. saving $25 and buying crap isn't something I'd do. I can't confirm that though.

heck I was even concerned about putting some new WD 4tb red drives in one of my synology nas boxes because even wd sucks these days. id love to save money but I'm going back to Hitachi in a couple of months. I can't see trusting my data to drives like this..
Not true.

The White Label drives are simply drives purchased in bulk for OEM use from manufacturers... There are really only 3 independent drive manufacturers these days, Western Digital (owns HGST), Seagate (owns Samsung's HDD division), and Toshiba... So depending on what model "White Label" drive you buy, it will have an identical retail model from one of those brands... You can usually tell by specs and pictures what drive (or at least what brand) it is...

The drive is so much cheaper because the warranty is covered by the OEM (or in this case, the vendors selling OEM drives), not the manufacturer... Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc all get their drives cheap as well because they warranty the drives instead of the manufacturer...

With any platter Hard Drive a little work as soon as you unbox it could save a lot of headaches... Do a full format after you first initialize it (not a quick format)... Once that is done, use a HDD utility like Seatools to check for SMART errors and bad sectors... If there are any errors during the test or even during the format, return the drive as defective...

In my experience, most defective drives show signs from day one, people just don't test for them... The people you see in reviews saying their drive failed in 3 months or a year or two probably didn't follow the steps listed above... They just did a quick format and started loading it with data... Their drive was already failing, they just didn't know to look for it...

Two things that will kill any healthy hard drive prematurely are confined space with poor ventilation, or inadequate power... The first should be obvious, but people don't realize that low power could ruin a drive... The biggest killer I've seen is people using external enclosures or docks for 2.5" drives that run off of USB 3.0 for power and DATA, but they use it in a USB 2.0 port... The drive will spin, but it's startup needs to pull more amps than USB 2.0 will allow... So it will slowly kill the motor. (The same goes for any underpowered electric motor)
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Last edited by b.arms September 1, 2016 at 06:03 AM
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#14
Quote from b.arms View Post :
Not true.

The White Label drives are simply drives purchased in bulk for OEM use from manufacturers... There is really only 3 independent drive manufacturers these days, Western Digital (owns HGST), Seagate (owns Samsung's HDD division), and Toshiba... So depending on what model "White Label" drive you buy, it will have an identical retail model from one of those brands... You can usually tell by specs and pictures what drive (or at least what brand) it is...

Everyone knows that there are 3 mfgs left in the western world, but actually, there are independent chinese mfgs, as I've already pointed out. Whether they are acting as second source factories to the other guys as well, I honestly don't know.

What I also don't know, and don't trust, is what these drives are on the inside. Firmware alone makes a lot of difference in drive behavior and longevity, as proved by WD since they only make two consumers drives, a 5400 red/green/blue/purple with firmware tweaks, and a 7200 black. The rest is just marketing nonsense and pricing changes to justify their bull shlt claims. If these are "seagate" drives, then I'd run, not walk, away as fast as I could.

I recently bought two more 4tb reds, but I've had four 3tb reds die almost immediately on me (total crap drives). This is one of the reasons their new green, ooops I mean red drives are now using "nasware 3.0" because they screwed the pooch so badly with their previous firmware releases. Until someone can really prove what these drives are, I'll remain cautious.

I'm also not sure that you understand what OEM means. Most people don't understand what it means; they just think they do. No company can purchase a product for "OEM use" That statement makes zero sense. As a limited example, Bendix is an OEM (original equipment mfg) for GM, who may/may not have those parts private labeled. The only place you can get an OEM part is from Bendix or a distributor who got it from Bendix. That means the OEM part will not have the GM label on it, but it is the same part because it came from the same factory, or the "original equipment mfg". (Note: GM may have second sources, all building parts to spec, but the example was to focus on what OEM means and why no company can buy something for "OEM use". Also, it makes no financial sense at all. I mean who would buy these to sell cheap? Answer. No one. Have you ever worked for a drive mfg? I have...

PS - Don't underestimate the chinese ability to deceive. Cover plates can be easily faked.



Oh yeah, almost forgot,

"In my experience, most defective drives show signs from day one, people just don't test for them... The people you see in reviews saying their drive failed in 3 months or a year or two probably didn't follow the steps listed above... They just did a quick format and started loading it with data... Their drive was already failing, they just didn't know to look for it..."

as for my failed WD drives, all drives were completely formatted, tested over night in a windows server, had WDL run, etc. All showed up initially as fine. They all failed almost immediately after that. they actually never made it into the synology boxes; they died before they could be installed.

I find your comments about power killing drives interesting, and it makes me wonder how any of us can tell that a drive isn't getting sufficient power (besides your usb 2.0 vs 3.0 example). What's the best way to tell (I just bought a new enclosure from newegg and put an old Samsung 2tb F4 in it after removing it from a NAS)?
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Last edited by xcopy September 1, 2016 at 06:20 AM
#15
Quote from xcopy View Post :
Everyone knows that there are 3 mfgs left in the western world, but actually, there are independent chinese mfgs, as I've already pointed out. Whether they are acting as second source factories to the other guys as well, I honestly don't know.

What I also don't know, and don't trust, is what these drives are on the inside. Firmware alone makes a lot of difference in drive behavior and longevity, as proved by WD since they only make two consumers drives, a 5400 red/green/blue/purple with firmware tweaks, and a 7200 black. The rest is just marketing nonsense and pricing changes to justify their bull shlt claims. If these are "seagate" drives, then I'd run, not walk, away as fast as I could.

I recently bought two more 4tb reds, but I've had four 3tb reds die almost immediately on me (total crap drives). This is one of the reasons their new green, ooops I mean red drives are now using "nasware 3.0" because they screwed the pooch so badly with their previous firmware releases. Until someone can really prove what these drives are, I'll remain cautious.

I'm also not sure that you understand what OEM means. Most people don't understand what it means; they just think they do. No company can purchase a product for "OEM use" That statement makes zero sense. As a limited example, Bendix is an OEM (original equipment mfg) for GM, who may/may not have those parts private labeled. The only place you can get an OEM part is from Bendix or a distributor who got it from Bendix. That means the OEM part will not have the GM label on it, but it is the same part because it came from the same factory, or the "original equipment mfg". (Note: GM may have second sources, all building parts to spec, but the example was to focus on what OEM means and why no company can buy something for "OEM use". Also, it makes no financial sense at all. I mean who would buy these to sell cheap? Answer. No one. Have you ever worked for a drive mfg? I have...

PS - Don't underestimate the chinese ability to deceive. Cover plates can be easily faked.



Oh yeah, almost forgot,

"In my experience, most defective drives show signs from day one, people just don't test for them... The people you see in reviews saying their drive failed in 3 months or a year or two probably didn't follow the steps listed above... They just did a quick format and started loading it with data... Their drive was already failing, they just didn't know to look for it..."

as for my failed WD drives, all drives were completely formatted, tested over night in a windows server, had WDL run, etc. All showed up initially as fine. They all failed almost immediately after that. they actually never made it into the synology boxes; they died before they could be installed.

I find your comments about power killing drives interesting, and it makes me wonder how any of us can tell that a drive isn't getting sufficient power (besides your usb 2.0 vs 3.0 example). What's the best way to tell (I just bought a new enclosure from newegg and put an old Samsung 2tb F4 in it after removing it from a NAS).
Having used White Label drives for several builds, and all of those drives still spinning as far as I know (except one DOA found during testing) says that they aren't just slapped together.

Taiwan is China, depending on who you ask, so you are kind-of right...

As for OEM, With PC building it means whoever builds the PC... When you buy an OEM license for Windows, it is cheaper, and Microsoft officially doesn't support it... The OEM (or company/person that builds the PC) is supposed to offer any technical support... Those White Label drives work the same way, except they have a 1 year warranty from the vendor, which is nice... The vendor is bending the rules a bit by NOT actually building anything with them, they just re-label and sell them... I doubt the HDD manufacturers care much as there are many people (like yourself, it seems) who don't trust anything not labeled with a brand name, so it doesn't eat into their retail drive business much...

I might not know what OEM means in relation to cars (I usually by aftermarket parts for those anyway)... But for PCs it means "Whoever assembles the PC"... Dell is an OEM... Lenovo is an OEM... I am an OEM when I build a PC and sell it... I warranty the parts and offer technical support, not the actual individual part manufacturers... (Although I can use their warranties if they are retail parts, like motherboards, video cards, RAM, etc...)

As for power... Amps times volts equals Watts... without some sort of in line tester, you have to go by rated power, and figure a full-sized 7200 RPM drive needs about 2 Amps at spin up (Probably closer to 1.5, but better safe than sorry)... Once it is spinning it probably only uses half an Amp or so... Most traditional PC power supplies have no problem. It's the enclosures or underpowered/upgraded systems that could cause issues... NAS boxes could have that same issue if the manufacturer didn't allocate power correctly, but that isn't likely...

As for your WD drives dying, that sounds like an almost best case scenario to me... had you done a quick format, those drives would have likely lasted months (beyond most return windows) before you noticed any issue with them... The full format reformats every sector, and tends to uncover issues much faster... It's hard to tell what would be apparent vs what won't, but I can say that I haven't had a drive in years fail once I have it spinning for a day or two after format and test... In other words, either they fail within the first day or two, or they spin for many many years without issue... That's been my experience after I started doing full formats anyway...
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Last edited by b.arms September 1, 2016 at 06:40 AM
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