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-   -   Thermapen Open Box Sale $69 + $6 Shipping (http://slickdeals.net/e/5806392-thermapen-open-box-sale-69-6-shipping)

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 10:13 AM

Thermapen Open Box Sale $69 + $6 Shipping
 
1 Attachment(s)
A super rare email only Thermapen open box sale.

http://www.thermoworks.com/produc...openbox-cs

yuugotserved 01-18-2013 10:13 AM

Thermapen Professional Fast Read Kitchen Thermometer (Open Box) $69 + Shipping
 
2 Attachment(s)
Thermoworks is offering Thermapen Professional Fast Read Kitchen Thermometer (Open Box) for $69. Shipping is $6 flat-rate and you may purchase up to 3 units. Thanks frikinelmo

wikipost 01-18-2013 10:13 AM

This post can and should be edited by users like you :)
 
For those looking for a more affordable solution, I'd highly consider the CDN DTQ450X.

Why?

1. America's Test Kitchen recommended is as the next best thermometer, and the best of the budget ones.

2. In real world testing, it's nearly identical to the thermapen. Take a look at this thread:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/c...ost4126189

3. It's only $18 on Amazon vs. $70-$90 for the thermapen

Quote:

Summary: DTQ450x is about 1-2 seconds slower than the TP, but only when making huge swings of nearly 100F. For our purposes, they are equal in read speed. Accuracy at ice and boiling are good and it tracks almost perfectly with the TP in the mash/sparge ranges.
CDN DTQ450X ProAccurate Quick-Read Thermometer [amazon.com]

Anyway, I'm sure it's not quite as good as the thermapen, but at 1/4 the cost and excellent reviews, it's worth considering.

The CDN model above is just as accurate as the Thermapen. Multiple reviews, including Thermapens own website show that the ONLY difference is the time it takes to read the temperature. The Thermapen will read it about 1-3 seconds faster. Unless you are one of the rare individuals who needs this, the CDN is a better buy at 1/5 the cost.

Rusty2192 01-18-2013 10:18 AM

Love my Thermapen.

UN0335 01-18-2013 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rusty2192 (Post 56938524)
Love my Thermapen.

Me too. This is as low as they ever go too, great deal!

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 10:23 AM

I've wanted one for years. Glad I signed up for their emails!

MicahJamesNRCAL 01-18-2013 10:28 AM

what exactly do these do?

verballz 01-18-2013 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56938704)
I've wanted one for years. Glad I signed up for their emails!


Yep, one of the best kitchen gadgets I've ever purchased. I actually keep two - one for outdoor BBQ and one for the kitchen.

PoohBah 01-18-2013 10:33 AM

I'm surprised this post has survived for more than 5 minutes without a comment about a walmart thermometer for $10.

Love, love, love my thermapen. Once you cook with one, you will never go without.

Shorted 01-18-2013 10:36 AM

Ugh - wonderful deal.... but there's no way the wife will understand $75 for another thermometer when I'm just now going to bust out the Maverick tomorrow that I got a couple months back.

@OP: One tip - you might want to include the $5.99 shipping in your title/post since it's a flat rate for pretty much everyone.



Quote:

Originally Posted by MicahJamesNRCAL (Post 56938830)
what exactly do these do?

Source article: A $93 Thermometer? Why the Thermapen Is Worth It [thekitchn.com]
Quote:

What's the difference between this and an "instant-read" thermometer? Well, an "instant-read" thermometer is never actually instant; the display updates instantly, but it takes 20 to 30 seconds to get an accurate reading of the temperature. This is eons, in cooking time, when the oven or grill is open, and heat is escaping. The Thermapen truly does give an instant read.

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 10:40 AM

Done. Thanks for the tip. I was in a hurry to get it listed!

rubdom 01-18-2013 10:43 AM

I have one. These are worth it. Never over cook my food now.

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 11:10 AM

The amazon reviews have me super excited. I think it will come in handy for baking bread.

http://www.amazon.com/Splash-Proo...ewpoints=1

creuset 01-18-2013 11:32 AM

Thank you! I've always wanted one of these well reviewed items (well liked by cooksillustrated). But they were too expensive. At $74.99 it's not necessarily cheap, but with slickdeals I'm assured that it is at least a great value. Thank you for the heads up on this insider deal.

russ257 01-18-2013 11:33 AM

In for one. I was pissed at the inconsisten readings i was getting while smoking my last brisket. This has been on the wishlist for a while but this sale sealed the deal.

Intropy 01-18-2013 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoohBah (Post 56938978)
I'm surprised this post has survived for more than 5 minutes without a comment about a walmart thermometer for $10.

Love, love, love my thermapen. Once you cook with one, you will never go without.

I'll bite. How do these differ from the $15 thermometer I bought at the local restaurant supply? I like having nice quality kitchen tools.

tstarks 01-18-2013 12:22 PM

I'm trying to think of instances where this type of gizmo would be better than a probe thermometer like this :http://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-Gourmet-Digital-Probe-Thermometer/dp/B005FQ2AO8/ref=sr_1_12?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1358536696&sr=1-12&keywords=probe+thermometer.

The only thing I can think of is candy making (where sugar temps will likely exceed the range of most probes) or really high temp frying (the unit I linked to goes up to 375 and a little beyond, so it works fine for me for frying).


With the probe, you don't have the downside of a traditional handheld instant read where the grill or oven has to be open. You make sure you place it properly, set a reminder for the desired temp, and it tells you when your roast, or oil, or whatever is done. And since the probe hasn't just been inserted, you're not waiting for an accurate read...it's accurate all the time.


What am I missing?

ETA: By the way, the unit that I linked to on Amazon goes on clearance every year at Target when they start getting rid of BBQ stuff. I've gotten them at 75% off 2 out of the past 3 years, and I've been using mine for 3 years.

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 12:23 PM

Thermocouple vs Thermistor [thermoworks.com]

blsrx10 01-18-2013 12:46 PM

At this price point, isn't iGrill a better option these days? there was a deal on that for $60 recently.

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 12:53 PM

iGrill is just a glorified themistor ($15) thermometer hooked up to an iphone via bluetooth. This is instant read, great for steaks and breads.

armedmetallica 01-18-2013 01:02 PM

i'll be that guy. isn't this far better? http://www.thermoworks.com/produc...timer.html

so you don't keep opening the door etc?

Yammies 01-18-2013 01:02 PM

Trying to debate whether to jump on this offer or go with a new one which is on sale price as well for 20.00 more. Anyone have any suggestions?

barnz008 01-18-2013 01:07 PM

Nice. Have rocked the pen for years and just got a temp probe for the smoker. Themocouple unit next. Thermoworks is a great company.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yammies (Post 56943472)
Trying to debate whether to jump on this offer or go with a new one which is on sale price as well for 20.00 more. Anyone have any suggestions?

You get a full warranty. Go for it. If you regret it, I'll buy it from you because they're almost never this cheap. :wave::D

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by armedmetallica (Post 56943460)
i'll be that guy. isn't this far better? http://www.thermoworks.com/produc...timer.html

so you don't keep opening the door etc?

It depends on what you are using it for. If you want to probe more than one spot or bake bread (you aren't going to leave a thermometer in a wad of raw dough when you pop it in the oven), no. Instant read, handheld is better. If you want to plug it into the center of a pot roast, you don't need to spend the extra money. Testing the doneness of a steak is faster and more accurate with a thermapen.

rhg84 01-18-2013 01:14 PM

I've had this one from the same company for a few years. About 3 or 4 seconds slower on a read but a third of the price. Great rewiews on amazon as well. Just not as pretty

19 + 6 shipping
http://www.amazon.com/RT600C-Supe...hermoworks

BloodGain 01-18-2013 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by armedmetallica (Post 56943460)
i'll be that guy. isn't this far better? http://www.thermoworks.com/produc...timer.html

so you don't keep opening the door etc?

I have both, and each has their uses. But if you were only going to buy one, I say buy an instant-read.

If you want the best instant-read on the market, buy a Thermapen. If you cook at all seriously, the Thermapen will pay for itself in the food you don't overcook.

BloodGain 01-18-2013 01:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Intropy (Post 56942056)
I'll bite. How do these differ from the $15 thermometer I bought at the local restaurant supply? I like having nice quality kitchen tools.

Any instant-read that can get a reading in a few seconds is "good enough" for most people. Thermoworks sells several cheaper models that get a reading in about 5 seconds that are better than most offerings.

The Thermapen, however, uses a thermocouple and higher-quality electronics. This allows it to get a much more pinpoint, accurate, and fast reading. If you're a serious cook, or a bread baker, it's worth it to have a faster, better instant-read thermometer.

travster 01-18-2013 02:37 PM

I was trying to rationalize purchasing a thermapen last night. Decided to dive in and get serious about cooking!

MSG123 01-18-2013 03:08 PM

AWESOME! I was on the fence about getting one in Dec. Glad I WAITED! Much thanks, OP!

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 03:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG123 (Post 56946394)
AWESOME! I was on the fence about getting one in Dec. Glad I WAITED! Much thanks, OP!

Glad to share! Of course I waited for order confirmation of my own before posting :lmao: Limited quantities and all.

Arreo 01-18-2013 03:46 PM

Oh man... These really are the creme de la creme of kitchen thermometers. We use ours for everything, from bread to meat to candy. If you're serious about your kitchen and get a lot of use out of a thermometer then you won't regret owning one. I'll grant that most people can get away with something cheaper and less accurate but you know...

baskerville 01-18-2013 03:50 PM

The Thermapen changed my culinary life. Get one. I paid full price and haven't had a single moment of regret.

ozmotion 01-18-2013 03:54 PM

I use both a thermapen and a slower probe-style thermometer, as each have their own applications.

The thermapen is really best for dishes that cook quickly, and particularly, things that are extremely unforgiving of over/undercooking. Obviously, it'd be quite overkill for braising, or a casserole.

It really really shines when I saute or grill steak and seafood.

Intropy 01-18-2013 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BloodGain (Post 56944376)
Any instant-read that can get a reading in a few seconds is "good enough" for most people. Thermoworks sells several cheaper models that get a reading in about 5 seconds that are better than most offerings.

The Thermapen, however, uses a thermocouple and higher-quality electronics. This allows it to get a much more pinpoint, accurate, and fast reading. If you're a serious cook, or a bread baker, it's worth it to have a faster, better instant-read thermometer.

Aha, thermocouple. I have a thermocouple at home I use for other stuff (mechanical, electronics, etc). Never thought about using it for food. I wouldn't want to use the same probe I use on lead in food, but an extra k-type probe costs maybe $15 bucks, so maybe I'll do that. Also the electronics part of a thermocouple isn't a pricey item, $30 or so. I still feel like I must be missing something. Maybe some sort of food-safety certification.

Mattsgarage 01-18-2013 04:00 PM

I'm a huge fan. I think I paid 99 for mine, worth every penny to me.

tstarks 01-18-2013 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Intropy (Post 56947536)
Aha, thermocouple. I have a thermocouple at home I use for other stuff (mechanical, electronics, etc). Never thought about using it for food. I wouldn't want to use the same probe I use on lead in food, but an extra k-type probe costs maybe $15 bucks, so maybe I'll do that. Also the electronics part of a thermocouple isn't a pricey item, $30 or so. I still feel like I must be missing something. Maybe some sort of food-safety certification.


You have my interest...but every Google search comes back with information about thermocouples for hot water heaters. Can you provide information about the tool and probes you're using? I think I want one.

ETA: I found some stuff. Thermometer unit for $40 http://www.amazon.com/Digital-k-t...sim_misc_4 and 2-probe kit for $13 http://www.amazon.com/Stainless-S...B005OXQUOI

Intropy 01-18-2013 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tstarks420 (Post 56947664)
You have my interest...but every Google search comes back with information about thermocouples for hot water heaters. Can you provide information about the tool and probes you're using? I think I want one.

ETA: I found some stuff. Thermometer unit for $40 http://www.amazon.com/Digital-k-t...sim_misc_4 and 2-probe kit for $13 http://www.amazon.com/Stainless-S...B005OXQUOI

Yep, pretty much exactly like that item. I can't remember what I have specifically. I don't pull it out all that much, and I bought it approximately forever ago from Radio Shack.

On second though what would be really awesome would be a k-type thermocouple probe stainless steel for use with reactive food and with a high temperature cord so you can thread it into an oven.

mthill 01-18-2013 04:35 PM

Quote:

You have my interest...but every Google search comes back with information about thermocouples for hot water heaters. Can you provide information about the tool and probes you're using? I think I want one.

ETA: I found some stuff. Thermometer unit for $40 http://www.amazon.com/Digital-k-t...sim_misc_4 and 2-probe kit for $13 http://www.amazon.com/Stainless-S...B005OXQUOI
Note that industrial use type-k thermocouples often have a tip that is MUCH larger than that of a Thermapen. This both increases the size of the hole you'll make in your food and increases the thermal mass of the probe (slowing the time until an accurate measurement can be made).

A type T thermocouple would be preferable. http://www.omega.com/thermocouples.html

SlikRick 01-18-2013 04:54 PM

Don't mind spending $75 if it means I am cooking my steak EXACTLY the way I want it.. but it is a lot to pay for something like this with only 1 Year warranty. At this price, they should be giving a 3 or even 5 year warranty!

deshwasi 01-18-2013 04:57 PM

why arent you guys using your $20 infrared ones from newegg?

SlikRick 01-18-2013 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deshwasi (Post 56948786)
why arent you guys using your $20 infrared ones from newegg?


because what matters is the internal temperature of the meat that you're cooking. Infrared can only measure surface temperature.

RugerRedhawk 01-18-2013 05:16 PM

Ah I need to replace the probe thermometer I left outside in the rain, probably need one I can leave in the smoker as opposed to this though.

BloodGain 01-18-2013 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Intropy (Post 56947536)
Aha, thermocouple. I have a thermocouple at home I use for other stuff (mechanical, electronics, etc). Never thought about using it for food. I wouldn't want to use the same probe I use on lead in food, but an extra k-type probe costs maybe $15 bucks, so maybe I'll do that. Also the electronics part of a thermocouple isn't a pricey item, $30 or so. I still feel like I must be missing something. Maybe some sort of food-safety certification.

Indeed! If you've got equipment for remote Type K probes, that's a good idea. I've considered getting a dual- or multi-probe unit for monitoring smoking temps and meat temps at the same time. I figure once I've invested in the reader, I can use it for multiple purposes instead of having multiple devices.

However, the entry-level cost for a good handheld reader isn't much better, and isn't likely to be as water-resistant as the Thermapen. The Thermapen is just well made, and uses a Type K thermocouple inside. Fluke, whom I would trust if I were buying a handheld probe thermometer, sells a similar professional-grade food thermometer. Depending on the model, it costs between $120-250.

Thermoworks also makes some handheld remote probe units. I haven't tried them, but they seem pretty serious about the thermometer business. Even if they were bad units, I've had good customer service from them (as you can tell), so I'd trust them to make it right.

copyright1997 01-18-2013 05:20 PM

In 4 2. One for brewing, one as a gift. Thanks OP, I've been waiting for these to become available at a better price! Repped.

creuset 01-18-2013 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deshwasi (Post 56948786)
why arent you guys using your $20 infrared ones from newegg?

I tried some of the newegg ones (rosewill infrared) and i had to return them. testing them at home, they proved to be about 5-10 degrees off. when i need to measure surfaces (like frying oil, pan heat), i use an automotive infrared thermometer--that one is accurate all the time. more expensive, but comforting. but otherwise if you're willing to mentally make a 5-10 degree adjustment, the rosewill ones are a good price.

rkanyok 01-18-2013 05:31 PM

Good deal. Took care of that future birthday present and got a backup for mine that got slightly melty at the grill one day - now it has to open really wide to turn on.

You are not a serious cook without this. It doesn't make you a serious cook, but a serious cook needs one.

Giantcrazy 01-18-2013 05:38 PM

This thing is friggin awesome. I've had it for 5 years, changed batteries on it once, and that's that. It's still lightning quick, and works over the entire range of temps I'll ever need it for.

I've yet to run across another thermometer that's as impressive as this, and I've owned them all. Granted, there are some uses where you're better off with something else (in particular, the Maverick for smoking since you want something you can leave hooked up and be able to check remotely), but they're few and far between.

Spend the money, if you cook regularly and use a thermometer you'll be glad you did.

Brew311 01-18-2013 05:45 PM

this is a no brainier if your a dedicated chef. Obviously I n 4 1.

brendanec 01-18-2013 06:09 PM

Perfect timing. Leave in thermometers are failing at high temperatures and cannot hold up during cooking.

In for 1.

old_ 01-18-2013 06:13 PM

thanks OP, I've been wanting one of these

deebuggin 01-18-2013 06:59 PM

We used this at my old work place (at a water quality lab).

https://us.vwr.com/store/catalog/...=15551-002

It looks so similar, but much cheaper... Is this not the same thing?

slickgrapes 01-18-2013 07:03 PM

All my food that I cook on a daily basis tastes good to me. Why do you need a 70+ dollar thermometer to cook? Am I the only one that thinks this is insane?

And yes I cook all kinds of stuff...

BrandonPr 01-18-2013 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deebuggin (Post 56950798)
We used this at my old work place (at a water quality lab).

https://us.vwr.com/store/catalog/...=15551-002

It looks so similar, but much cheaper... Is this not the same thing?

Good question. Anyone?:wave:

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 6grapes (Post 56950856)
All my food that I cook on a daily basis tastes good to me. Why do you need a 70+ dollar thermometer to cook? Am I the only one that thinks this is insane?

And yes I cook all kinds of stuff...

If you have to ask "why do you need it," you probably don't. I'm sure lots of people think its insane.

Quote:

Originally Posted by deebuggin (Post 56950798)
We used this at my old work place (at a water quality lab).

https://us.vwr.com/store/catalog/...=15551-002

It looks so similar, but much cheaper... Is this not the same thing?

The amazon review seems to suggest it is not the same thing. http://www.amazon.com/VWR-Flip-St...Descending

slickgrapes 01-18-2013 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56951226)
If you have to ask "why do you need it," you probably don't. I'm sure lots of people think its insane.

It seems like a lot of people "need" this though from the looks of it. What are the common uses of it that justify the hefty price tag?

When I see this, I think of steaks at first...but once you figure out the time it takes to cook one, you can become a good judge of how long/hot to cook one in the future so....what else is it used for?

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 6grapes (Post 56951476)
It seems like a lot of people "need" this though from the looks of it. What are the common uses of it that justify the hefty price tag?

When I see this, I think of steaks at first...but once you figure out the time it takes to cook one, you can become a good judge of how long/hot to cook one in the future so....what else is it used for?

Ruin a few expensive steaks and you'll wish you had one. The learning process can be costly and frustrating. It also works great for baking bread. Bread can be tough to time right depending on the size of the loaf, amount or rise you got, hydration...etc. Once the crust forms, the inside can be a mystery. Nothing more frustrating than ruining loaves that took a day + in proof time. This takes the guess work out of it by responding rapidly enough to not kill your oven temp. They are heavily used in bbq competitions. If you are testing the temp of multiple pieces of meat rapidly, time and accuracy is critical. Also, due to the rapid response rate, you can accurately test the temperature of multiple varying items back to back to back to back. From ice water to a brisket in seconds.

Some people also take pleasure in using a finely crafted piece of equipment. I enjoy every time I prep vegetables with my Shun knives for instance. That is worth money to some folks, not to all.

UN0335 01-18-2013 08:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56951226)
If you have to ask "why do you need it," you probably don't. I'm sure lots of people think its insane.



The amazon review seems to suggest it is not the same thing. http://www.amazon.com/VWR-Flip-St...Descending


Not the same thing, look at this:

http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2...e-testing/

frikinelmo 01-18-2013 09:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UN0335 (Post 56952360)
Not the same thing, look at this:

http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2...e-testing/

I'd say that successfully answers why a thermapen vs a cheaper thermometer.

verymetal 01-18-2013 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56951916)
Ruin a few expensive steaks and you'll wish you had one. The learning process can be costly and frustrating. It also works great for baking bread. Bread can be tough to time right depending on the size of the loaf, amount or rise you got, hydration...etc. Once the crust forms, the inside can be a mystery. Nothing more frustrating than ruining loaves that took a day + in proof time. This takes the guess work out of it by responding rapidly enough to not kill your oven temp. They are heavily used in bbq competitions. If you are testing the temp of multiple pieces of meat rapidly, time and accuracy is critical. Also, due to the rapid response rate, you can accurately test the temperature of multiple varying items back to back to back to back. From ice water to a brisket in seconds.

Some people also take pleasure in using a finely crafted piece of equipment. I enjoy every time I prep vegetables with my Shun knives for instance. That is worth money to some folks, not to all.


thoughtful and helpful response, versus passionate and defensive. My new favorite SD member; may it be contagious.

mikeyz 01-18-2013 10:37 PM

Just had a baby will this work rectal?

adamant 01-18-2013 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rhg84 (Post 56943710)
I've had this one from the same company for a few years. About 3 or 4 seconds slower on a read but a third of the price. Great rewiews on amazon as well. Just not as pretty

19 + 6 shipping
http://www.amazon.com/RT600C-Supe...hermoworks

This one looks like a good option or the similar one RT301WA with the auto shut-off. This appears to use the same tech. as the thermapen, right?

Cirrus 01-18-2013 10:41 PM

Well, if you're a cheap bastard like me you can go with one of the CDN digital thermometers that are a little bit slower. Mine takes maybe 10 seconds to get a good lock on temps. In Thermoworks' test video it took 7.5 secs for my CDN to get down to 32F which isn't too bad at all. I guess if you really need that 5 second edge the thermopen is worth it but I can usually spare the extra 5-6 seconds lol.

Hefner413 01-18-2013 10:44 PM

been wanting a good thermometer since thanksgiving when my wife was frantic over if the turkey was done or not (the plastic pin wasn't popping..).

expensive? quite. but I figure it'll be worth the investment over time.

I just kinda wish that I wasn't risking getting a Refurb. These are all returns / refurbs / or damaged packaging. Not truly just on sale...

bluetrep 01-18-2013 10:47 PM

lol, need thermometer for cooking?

slickgrapes 01-18-2013 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56951916)
Ruin a few expensive steaks and you'll wish you had one. The learning process can be costly and frustrating. It also works great for baking bread. Bread can be tough to time right depending on the size of the loaf, amount or rise you got, hydration...etc. Once the crust forms, the inside can be a mystery. Nothing more frustrating than ruining loaves that took a day + in proof time. This takes the guess work out of it by responding rapidly enough to not kill your oven temp. They are heavily used in bbq competitions. If you are testing the temp of multiple pieces of meat rapidly, time and accuracy is critical. Also, due to the rapid response rate, you can accurately test the temperature of multiple varying items back to back to back to back. From ice water to a brisket in seconds.

Some people also take pleasure in using a finely crafted piece of equipment. I enjoy every time I prep vegetables with my Shun knives for instance. That is worth money to some folks, not to all.

Awesome thank you. Once you mentioned the comparison of using a nice knife set, I totally understood.

Brian1 01-18-2013 11:02 PM

While we're on the subject of temperature, if you're tired of dry chicken meat or dry turkey at Thanksgiving, don't listen to the government and overcook your chicken or turkey to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F in the breast.

Instead, cook your poultry (chicken, turkey, duck, goose, quail, etc.) to 150 degrees F in the breast meat and 160 degrees F in the leg meat. It's perfectly safe to eat and will yield the juiciest chicken or turkey meat you've ever had.

Depending on the size and shape of the piece of meat you're cooking and the temperature at which you're cooking it, you'll want to pull it anywhere from a few degrees to up to 10 or so degrees before it hits the target internal temperature. So, the next time you're cooking your Thanksgiving turkey, insert your probe thermometer (not this Thermapen this thread is about) in the breast or thigh and set the alarm for a little less than the target temperatures mentioned above (somewhere in the 140s for breast meat - again, depending on the size, shape, and cooking temperature - and 150s for leg meat) and set the alarm. Once the alarm goes off, use an instant read to temp a couple of other places in the bird to make sure the proper temperatures have been reached, pull the turkey and let it rest on the counter. The internal temperature will continue to rise (this is called "carryover cooking") up to the target temperature giving you a perfectly safe and very juicy bird.

For example, if you're roasting a turkey at 350 - 400 degrees F and your probe is one of the breasts, set the alarm for about 143 degrees F and by the time carryover does its thing, the temperature will be above 150 degrees F, safe to eat, and very juicy indeed.

frazwr01 01-18-2013 11:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56951916)
Ruin a few expensive steaks and you'll wish you had one. The learning process can be costly and frustrating. It also works great for baking bread. Bread can be tough to time right depending on the size of the loaf, amount or rise you got, hydration...etc. Once the crust forms, the inside can be a mystery. Nothing more frustrating than ruining loaves that took a day + in proof time. This takes the guess work out of it by responding rapidly enough to not kill your oven temp. They are heavily used in bbq competitions. If you are testing the temp of multiple pieces of meat rapidly, time and accuracy is critical. Also, due to the rapid response rate, you can accurately test the temperature of multiple varying items back to back to back to back. From ice water to a brisket in seconds.

Some people also take pleasure in using a finely crafted piece of equipment. I enjoy every time I prep vegetables with my Shun knives for instance. That is worth money to some folks, not to all.

I can't agree more with this sentiment. For those on the fence, consider buying a model from this company in an intermediate price range.

For those looking for a quality thermometer from the same manufacturer but can't stomach the hefty price tag, check out this model: http://www.amazon.com/RT600C-Supe...992&sr=1-1

Response time is 5 sec vs 3 sec, but is only $25 shipped. Not to knock their high end model -- it is the best when it comes to accuracy and response time. But if you are looking for an accurate, albeit not as rapidly responsive, digital thermometer under $25 -- try this one.

Sassan 01-18-2013 11:45 PM

Sweet, a thread I can blow up. This is what my college degree is in, plus 15+ years in real life, daily, restaurant experience for a massive global chain. In addition, I have helped the National Restaurant Assocation make recommendations to the FDA and USDA about food laws, and have helped write the exams (both English and Spanish) that food service managers have to take, aka ServSafe. Needless to say, I think I have some credentials to back up my comments, which is why I put this all first.



Please remember, there is a huge difference between food QUALITY and food SAFETY. A 250 degree hamburger patty will definitely be safe to eat, but it will taste like crap because it wil have been burnt to a crisp. Safe, but not quality.

Quote:

Originally Posted by BloodGain (Post 56944376)
Any instant-read that can get a reading in a few seconds is "good enough" for most people. Thermoworks sells several cheaper models that get a reading in about 5 seconds that are better than most offerings.

To get an accurrate reading to ensure that your food is safe, you need to leave your thermometer in place for 15 secs and reach the required minimal internal temperature. Five secs is NOT long enough.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arreo (Post 56947302)
Oh man... These really are the creme de la creme of kitchen thermometers. We use ours for everything, from bread to meat to candy. If you're serious about your kitchen and get a lot of use out of a thermometer then you won't regret owning one. I'll grant that most people can get away with something cheaper and less accurate but you know...

These may be nice thermometers for home use, but they are nowhere near to being the best thing out there. Look at Cooper-Atkins for the higher end kits that are available.

For every day home use, this one would probably be fine as long as it is used correctly. The biggest key, calibrate it before EACH use. Fill a glass with ice and cold water, wait 30 secs, insert thermometer, and it should stabilize at 32 degrees. If not, you adjust it until it does.

A $10,000 thermometer is worthless until it is properly calibrated.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mattsgarage (Post 56947578)
I'm a huge fan. I think I paid 99 for mine, worth every penny to me.

For that price, you could put a few more bucks on it and get a more Industrial strength one that will last you for a LONG, LONG time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlikRick (Post 56948744)
Don't mind spending $75 if it means I am cooking my steak EXACTLY the way I want it.. but it is a lot to pay for something like this with only 1 Year warranty. At this price, they should be giving a 3 or even 5 year warranty!


So I will use Cooper-Atkins again since they are one of the biggest at this........lifetime calibration warranty on thermocouples and probes. A probe doesn't go bad unless a wire breaks, and that is usually from physical damage which is covered. The thermocouples don't go bad unless, again, they are physically damaged.



Quote:

Originally Posted by 6grapes (Post 56950856)
All my food that I cook on a daily basis tastes good to me. Why do you need a 70+ dollar thermometer to cook? Am I the only one that thinks this is insane?
And yes I cook all kinds of stuff...

To survive. Congress is finally hearing the cries regarding the concerns with food safety and the entire food supply network.

Ever eat something, then "it didn't agree with me" or "must have been the new spices" or similar. Yeah, probably a foodborne illness that got to you.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56954128)
While we're on the subject of temperature, if you're tired of dry chicken meat or dry turkey at Thanksgiving, don't listen to the government and overcook your chicken or turkey to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F in the breast.

Instead, cook your poultry (chicken, turkey, duck, goose, quail, etc.) to 150 degrees F in the breast meat and 160 degrees F in the leg meat. It's perfectly safe to eat and will yield the juiciest chicken or turkey meat you've ever had.

Depending on the size and shape of the piece of meat you're cooking and the temperature at which you're cooking it, you'll want to pull it anywhere from a few degrees to up to 10 or so degrees before it hits the target internal temperature. So, the next time you're cooking your Thanksgiving turkey, insert your probe thermometer (not this Thermapen this thread is about) in the breast or thigh and set the alarm for a little less than the target temperatures mentioned above and set the alarm. Once the alarm goes off, pull the turkey and let it rest on the counter. The internal temperature will continue to rise (this is called "carryover cooking") up to the target temperature giving you a perfectly safe and very juicy bird.

This would be potentially correct, however.....to be 100% correct, you need to keep your thermometer in the bird and verify it hit 165 degrees for 15 secs. Otherwise, whoever eats the poulty is at serious risk of foodborne illness.




If you guys are serious about cooking temps, I would look industrial units at a place like Grainger. They can get pricey very quickly though, FYI.







I am glad to hear that people at least check their food. You can never be too safe. There is example after example of foodborne illnesses causing massive illnesses, businesses to fail, and even cases of death.

Good luck!

dngrcnnn 01-19-2013 12:16 AM

Cool. I've had their $20 thermometer for a few years, but at this price, looks like it's time to upgrade. Cheers OP!

Brian1 01-19-2013 12:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56954460)
This would be potentially correct, however.....to be 100% correct, you need to keep your thermometer in the bird and verify it hit 165 degrees for 15 secs. Otherwise, whoever eats the poulty is at serious risk of foodborne illness.

I'm glad you said that. I don't think I was clear enough and have, as a result, edited my original post to be clearer.

I wasn't suggesting that the final internal temperature of the breast needs to 165 degrees - that is a guaranteed way to have dry chicken meat. Instead, for very juicy breast meat, the final temperature after resting and after carryover does it's job should be 150 degrees F in the breast and 160 degrees F in the thigh. So, the bird should be pulled out of the oven before it hits 150 and 160 degrees F, respectively.

According to Harold McGee, the world's foremost food authority on food science, chemistry, and safety, poultry breast meat at 150 degrees F and leg meat at 160 degrees is perfectly safe to eat. Actually, both are safe to eat at just below 150 degrees F, but 160 degrees F in the leg meat yields a better textured product.

The government puts out their guidelines of 165 degrees F as a minimum (and a guaranteed way to yield dry poultry meat) not because that's truly the minimum safe temperature, but, rather, that's a temperature that's enough above the true minimum safe temperature that it will give enough of a buffer to keep the hundreds of millions of Americans who don't use a thermometer and those who might not be too bright a safety net so to speak. In other words, it's a catch-all temperature.

For those who properly use an accurate instant read or probe thermometer, a final internal temperature of 150 degrees in the breast meat and 160 degrees in the leg meat is perfectly safe to eat.

Brian1 01-19-2013 01:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56954460)
Ever eat something, then "it didn't agree with me" or "must have been the new spices" or similar. Yeah, probably a foodborne illness that got to you.

I am glad to hear that people at least check their food. You can never be too safe. There is example after example of foodborne illnesses causing massive illnesses, businesses to fail, and even cases of death.

To be clear, the vast majority of foodborne illnesses come from improper handling of food, not internal temperatures. So, cross-contamination, lack of cleanliness such as not washing hands, and holding food at dangerous temperatures should be our primary focus to help curb foodborne illnesses.

fireserphant 01-19-2013 02:09 AM

I know everyone says this product is great, but I'm just amazed how a company pieced together essentially a thermocouple and a voltmeter into a $70 package. I actually work with thermocouples as a small piece if my job, and I think the others here who work with such devices are as amazed as I am. I really don't see a whole lot of engineering that goes into this...just some really good marketing. I mean, it's pretty clear their prices are way above cost...just look at their accessories ($19 for a wall mount...). I'm not saying don't buy it, I'm just saying we should all get into the meat thermometer business and split the profits so everyone can afford the new Canon 6D without waiting for a slick deal.

suture83 01-19-2013 02:43 AM

i was about to buy but the website is not allowing me to checkout, anyone else experiencing this?

the page just refreshes itself and doesn't proceed to checkout...

firemedic1343 01-19-2013 02:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fireserphant (Post 56955476)
I know everyone says this product is great, but I'm just amazed how a company pieced together essentially a thermocouple and a voltmeter into a $70 package. I actually work with thermocouples as a small piece if my job, and I think the others here who work with such devices are as amazed as I am. I really don't see a whole lot of engineering that goes into this...just some really good marketing. I mean, it's pretty clear their prices are way above cost...just look at their accessories ($19 for a wall mount...). I'm not saying don't buy it, I'm just saying we should all get into the meat thermometer business and split the profits so everyone can afford the new Canon 6D without waiting for a slick deal.


Agreed. This may be the highest end consumer device of it's kind, but it's a big price to swallow for day to day use. And if I'm reading this thread correctly, this isn't really as high end as pro models.

Dealseeker16 01-19-2013 03:37 AM

Having a hard time convincing myself to get one of these. I already have the thermoworks probe thermometer. Hmmmm do I need this for $75?!?

frikinelmo 01-19-2013 05:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fireserphant (Post 56955476)
I know everyone says this product is great, but I'm just amazed how a company pieced together essentially a thermocouple and a voltmeter into a $70 package. I actually work with thermocouples as a small piece if my job, and I think the others here who work with such devices are as amazed as I am. I really don't see a whole lot of engineering that goes into this...just some really good marketing. I mean, it's pretty clear their prices are way above cost...just look at their accessories ($19 for a wall mount...). I'm not saying don't buy it, I'm just saying we should all get into the meat thermometer business and split the profits so everyone can afford the new Canon 6D without waiting for a slick deal.

If it really was easy and cheap to create an equivalent instrument, someone else would have. These are wildly popular and the head-to-head comparisons illustrate they are no where near the same quality and accuracy. Free market for the win.

kettyserene 01-19-2013 05:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56954460)
For that price, you could put a few more bucks on it and get a more Industrial strength one that will last you for a LONG, LONG time.




So I will use Cooper-Atkins again since they are one of the biggest at this........lifetime calibration warranty on thermocouples and probes. A probe doesn't go bad unless a wire breaks, and that is usually from physical damage which is covered. The thermocouples don't go bad unless, again, they are physically damaged.

Guess I'm not jumping on this deal then. Going to hold out and buy a professional one. Only gain on the Thermoworks ones are that there are so many pretty colors to choose from.

slickBreezie 01-19-2013 05:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56955084)
I'm glad you said that. I don't think I was clear enough and have, as a result, edited my original post to be clearer.

I wasn't suggesting that the final internal temperature of the breast needs to 165 degrees - that is a guaranteed way to have dry chicken meat. Instead, for very juicy breast meat, the final temperature after resting and after carryover does it's job should be 150 degrees F in the breast and 160 degrees F in the thigh. So, the bird should be pulled out of the oven before it hits 150 and 160 degrees F, respectively.

According to Harold McGee, the world's foremost food authority on food science, chemistry, and safety, poultry breast meat at 150 degrees F and leg meat at 160 degrees is perfectly safe to eat. Actually, both are safe to eat at just below 150 degrees F, but 160 degrees F in the leg meat yields a better textured product.

The government puts out their guidelines of 165 degrees F as a minimum (and a guaranteed way to yield dry poultry meat) not because that's truly the minimum safe temperature, but, rather, that's a temperature that's enough above the true minimum safe temperature that it will give enough of a buffer to keep the hundreds of millions of Americans who don't use a thermometer and those who might not be too bright a safety net so to speak. In other words, it's a catch-all temperature.

For those who properly use an accurate instant read or probe thermometer, a final internal temperature of 150 degrees in the breast meat and 160 degrees in the leg meat is perfectly safe to eat.

You can also eat chicken breast at a SAFE 140 degrees held at about 35 minutes which is even juicier than the 150. Just buy an immersion circulator and sous vide it :drool:.

mike808 01-19-2013 05:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fireserphant (Post 56955476)
I'm not saying don't buy it, I'm just saying we should all get into the meat thermometer business and split the profits so everyone can afford the new Canon 6D without waiting for a slick deal.

So why haven't you and your buddies done so? Oh, yeah. You need marketing to tell us why your new generic thermocouple is better than this one. Price alone is not a decision point for consumers. With two 'equivalent' choices what are the decision factors? Marketing and branding. Free market economics 101.

Anyone who has ever cooked fish, scallops, seafood (baked, etc) needs this. Once you can hit perfect fish consistently, you will enjoy your food so much more than when you had no clue it was over-done. And if you have no pride in what you cook for yourself and your loved ones, then yeah, this product is not for you.

My concern is to know if the premium is worthi for 'new' vs 'refurb'.

mike808 01-19-2013 06:27 AM

Anyone with a referral or promo code?
In for one and a pocket reader for a gift and a spatula too. They are on sale for 30% off - $7.

They have some thermopens in black with a flame job - perfect for BBQ or the grill - also on sale (for regular price of $89, meaning the flame job is free).

Sorry, all sold out of camo.

Wish the mobile site would let me rep the OP.

Kramerica20 01-19-2013 06:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56943190)
iGrill is just a glorified themistor ($15) thermometer hooked up to an iphone via bluetooth. This is instant read, great for steaks and breads.

iGrill is a different animal. I love mine. Nothing like being able to monitor the pork and grill temp from inside the house, on my phone.

Like others have stated, the thermapen has it's purpose, and is awesome in its own right.

Kramerica20 01-19-2013 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56943190)
iGrill is just a glorified themistor ($15) thermometer hooked up to an iphone via bluetooth. This is instant read, great for steaks and breads.

and this is JUST a thermometer. Apples and bowling balls.....each is great for it's own purpose.

Phyxius 01-19-2013 07:23 AM

These work great and I have a orange one and a red one already. I use a WSM to smoke a bunch of foods and this gives a quick read on final temps. I also use remote probes but I feel like this gives a better " True" temp on the foods over some of the remote probes that read off a few degrees.

babyjay8495 01-19-2013 07:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frazwr01 (Post 56954134)
I can't agree more with this sentiment. For those on the fence, consider buying a model from this company in an intermediate price range.

For those looking for a quality thermometer from the same manufacturer but can't stomach the hefty price tag, check out this model: http://www.amazon.com/RT600C-Supe...992&sr=1-1

Response time is 5 sec vs 3 sec, but is only $25 shipped. Not to knock their high end model -- it is the best when it comes to accuracy and response time. But if you are looking for an accurate, albeit not as rapidly responsive, digital thermometer under $25 -- try this one.

I have been looking for a decent thermometer for a while now, i've had the cheap ones from walmart which suck balls (and not in a good way). It looks like to me the $70 is the snap-on line of thermometer's. Would it be safe to say the $25 one is middle of the road model at best? I'm not sure i can justify spending $70 on one, but could see doing $25.

bobma 01-19-2013 07:37 AM

not a hot deal at all, I would stay away from a refurb. You never know where this device has been. like up somebody's you know what. have fun eating.

mjw_2 01-19-2013 07:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56954460)
Sweet, a thread I can blow up. This is what my college degree is in, plus 15+ years in real life, daily, restaurant experience for a massive global chain. In addition, I have helped the National Restaurant Assocation make recommendations to the FDA and USDA about food laws, and have helped write the exams (both English and Spanish) that food service managers have to take, aka ServSafe. Needless to say, I think I have some credentials to back up my comments, which is why I put this all first.



Please remember, there is a huge difference between food QUALITY and food SAFETY. A 250 degree hamburger patty will definitely be safe to eat, but it will taste like crap because it wil have been burnt to a crisp. Safe, but not quality.



To get an accurrate reading to ensure that your food is safe, you need to leave your thermometer in place for 15 secs and reach the required minimal internal temperature. Five secs is NOT long enough.



These may be nice thermometers for home use, but they are nowhere near to being the best thing out there. Look at Cooper-Atkins for the higher end kits that are available.

For every day home use, this one would probably be fine as long as it is used correctly. The biggest key, calibrate it before EACH use. Fill a glass with ice and cold water, wait 30 secs, insert thermometer, and it should stabilize at 32 degrees. If not, you adjust it until it does.

A $10,000 thermometer is worthless until it is properly calibrated.



For that price, you could put a few more bucks on it and get a more Industrial strength one that will last you for a LONG, LONG time.




So I will use Cooper-Atkins again since they are one of the biggest at this........lifetime calibration warranty on thermocouples and probes. A probe doesn't go bad unless a wire breaks, and that is usually from physical damage which is covered. The thermocouples don't go bad unless, again, they are physically damaged.





To survive. Congress is finally hearing the cries regarding the concerns with food safety and the entire food supply network.

Ever eat something, then "it didn't agree with me" or "must have been the new spices" or similar. Yeah, probably a foodborne illness that got to you.



This would be potentially correct, however.....to be 100% correct, you need to keep your thermometer in the bird and verify it hit 165 degrees for 15 secs. Otherwise, whoever eats the poulty is at serious risk of foodborne illness.




If you guys are serious about cooking temps, I would look industrial units at a place like Grainger. They can get pricey very quickly though, FYI.







I am glad to hear that people at least check their food. You can never be too safe. There is example after example of foodborne illnesses causing massive illnesses, businesses to fail, and even cases of death.

Good luck!

You seem knowledge about the restaurant field. What thermocouple device would you recommend for measuring fried chicken legs and wings and the occasional washing machine check? I would something that is quick and easy to use and can withstand abuse.

thadius65 01-19-2013 08:14 AM

skagasz - don't tell her.... bottom line is we men accessorize differently. Things like thermometers, not shoes, jewlery, etc... ;o)

These are the best for indoor use. I use Maverick, Oregon and CyberQ for outside.

Good luck!

woodygg 01-19-2013 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by armedmetallica (Post 56943460)
i'll be that guy. isn't this far better? http://www.thermoworks.com/produc...timer.html

so you don't keep opening the door etc?

depending upon what you're cooking, yes - that one is much better.

woodygg 01-19-2013 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobma (Post 56957042)
not a hot deal at all, I would stay away from a refurb. You never know where this device has been. like up somebody's you know what. have fun eating.

maybe you should try washing things after using them...

Danzilla 01-19-2013 09:29 AM

Really don't get it. I have a couple digital probes and while they're not thermocouples, they also certainly don't take 20-30s to read (like mentioned in a article someone linked to earlier.) Generally the temperature stabilizes in under 10s. They may not be accurate within 1 degree... but so what? 3, even 5 degrees off is fine for most anything (and tested mine in boiling water for 1 to 3 degrees off 212). If these Thermapens were $50 I could maybe understand it... but $75 for a refurbished? :P I use my digital probes a good bit, and for under $20 each. I don't understand why someone in a home kitchen needs any more, other than just because they have to have the expensive and fancy gadgets.

frikinelmo 01-19-2013 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobma (Post 56957042)
not a hot deal at all, I would stay away from a refurb. You never know where this device has been. like up somebody's you know what. have fun eating.

And all restaurant forks have been in hundreds of mouths. I'm guessing you don't bring your own fork to eat.

Mykexyz 01-19-2013 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Danzilla (Post 56958452)
Really don't get it. I have a couple digital probes and while they're not thermocouples, they also certainly don't take 20-30s to read (like mentioned in a article someone linked to earlier.) Generally the temperature stabilizes in under 10s. They may not be accurate within 1 degree... but so what? 3, even 5 degrees off is fine for most anything (and tested mine in boiling water for 1 to 3 degrees off 212). If these Thermapens were $50 I could maybe understand it... but $75 for a refurbished? :P I use my digital probes a good bit, and for under $20 each. I don't understand why someone in a home kitchen needs any more, other than just because they have to have the expensive and fancy gadgets.

3 degrees can be the difference between really sweet scrambled eggs and custard, for example; killing a bacteria and not. Depending on what you are doing, a degree can make all the difference - is this for everyone? Heck no.

For many people, +/-2 degrees, wider probe points, and longer read times are just fine. For others, it is not. For some, it is simply about having great tools for their hobby, like the guy who has 100 clamps of various sizes and pressures. Or the guys with 100 power tools. You often do not need most advanced tools - they just make life a bit easier and more accurate :)

In for 1 :)

frikinelmo 01-19-2013 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Danzilla (Post 56958452)
Really don't get it. I have a couple digital probes and while they're not thermocouples, they also certainly don't take 20-30s to read (like mentioned in a article someone linked to earlier.) Generally the temperature stabilizes in under 10s. They may not be accurate within 1 degree... but so what? 3, even 5 degrees off is fine for most anything (and tested mine in boiling water for 1 to 3 degrees off 212). If these Thermapens were $50 I could maybe understand it... but $75 for a refurbished? :P I use my digital probes a good bit, and for under $20 each. I don't understand why someone in a home kitchen needs any more, other than just because they have to have the expensive and fancy gadgets.

Some things are worth having speed and accuracy. As I posted before, if you are baking bread or cooking medium-rare steaks, it is worth it. If you're testing the core temperature of your frozen pot pie, probably not. The video previously posted does a great job of comparing them to the more affordable retail thermometers.

http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2...e-testing/

I can understand coming into a thread and either 1 - pointing out a lower price somewhere else, or evidence of better sales previously. or 2- first hand accounts of the product and how it isn't worth it. I don't necessarily understand the purpose of posts like yours. A summary would be "I have no use for this item, nor do I want to pay for it." It adds very little to the discussion.

rkanyok 01-19-2013 10:10 AM

Just a reminder for those who don't understand why they should spend on this thermometer or think there is a better one for less - this is thermometer recommended by Cooks Illustrated/America's Test Kitchen. They test every possibility and always look at new products. You aren't smarter than they are, don't have access to all the products they have, and don't put it through the same conditions.

I have found they are very rarely wrong, and in those cases it's usually because of personal preference or because they don't take left-handedness into account. (Examples: Ladles should be double lipped, not single, and I like Misono knives better than Masamoto, but the Masamoto is still awesome.) And even CI/ATK doesn't think this thermometer does everything, they have recommendations for probes as well, for when that's more appropriate. This is just another tool in the toolbox, not a sonic screwdriver.

As for the guy who keeps telling us to cook poultry to 150F, try brining the bird and cook to proper temperature. It's more than just juiciness, a 150F bird is going to have a strange texture that most people aren't going to like. You might, but most people don't.

yankswinagain 01-19-2013 10:18 AM

Thanks OP... sent the link to my wife as a "strong suggestion" for my wedding anniversary present. Now when it comes, will she make me wait the 3 weeks to the anniversary...

SuperSkerple 01-19-2013 10:25 AM

Finally the proud owner of a Thermapen

langjie 01-19-2013 10:39 AM

thanks for making me get something I never knew I needed

sreeves3 01-19-2013 11:22 AM

I can grill a perfect steak everytime and don't need a thermometer to tell me when its done.

Starchaser 01-19-2013 11:37 AM

Hmm, it is very tempting to get a second one. I love mine!

mike808 01-19-2013 11:40 AM

You can use it on more than that one cut of steak you know how to cook perfectly for yourself. Like if you had a dinner date who liked a different cut or thickness or liked fish or chicken instead of your steakums.

This is the right tool for the job if you're cooking different meats/poultry/fish cuts and thicknesses to different temps (med-rare, medium, med-well, well).

As for the commercial ones mentioned, those are for commercial use where food safety is a laibility issue and getting the temp right is a big deal if you are in a restaurant. I don't think these are for that market. They are also priced for commercial use.

But for a home cook enthusiast or foodie that wants good tools that help them be better cooks, then this is a good product for the money. For the casual cook, then their $25 unit is just fine, more than likely.

myact321 01-19-2013 11:50 AM

I've been wanting one of these forever, but made myself buy a cheaper thermaworks originally. Have been using the chip one a lot. This sale gave me a good reason to upgrade though :)

SlickCanon 01-19-2013 11:53 AM

Thanks OP, bought myself one.

sdallnct 01-19-2013 12:01 PM

Got one. Been waiting for a deal...thanks op

Gregory 01-19-2013 12:04 PM

They're in Utah! Stupid tax.

CaseLogic 01-19-2013 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sreeves3 (Post 56960208)
I can grill a perfect steak everytime and don't need a thermometer to tell me when its done.

Thanks for contributing

adamzupa 01-19-2013 12:45 PM

in 4 1 thanks op

Ray97 01-19-2013 01:11 PM

These are for people who can't cook or just plain anal about cooking their food at the exact temps. Waste of money imo.

Mermaid 01-19-2013 01:16 PM

Awesome! I have to cook sugar to an exact degree and my current thermometer is a big sluggish.

Thanks!

scooch 01-19-2013 01:23 PM

will one of these turn a bad cook into a master chef like bobby flay?

for $80 it better.

Mermaid 01-19-2013 01:32 PM

Hey, what does "sold as-is, no returns or exchanges, full warranty included" mean exactly?

bluesloth 01-19-2013 01:43 PM

I've been wanting a high quality kitchen thermometer for the last few months for BBQing. I'm in. Thanks OP!

SlickCanon 01-19-2013 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mermaid (Post 56962172)
Hey, what does "sold as-is, no returns or exchanges, full warranty included" mean exactly?

Means you can't return if if you don't like it. If it comes broken they'll repair it under the 1 year warranty.

This sale happens all the time and I haven't seen anyone complain about getting a broken product from the open box/refurb sale.

Brian1 01-19-2013 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sreeves3 (Post 56960208)
I can grill a perfect steak everytime and don't need a thermometer to tell me when its done.

Actually, this is one of the most truthful statements in this entire thread.

First, I will say that I own this thermometer along with a host of other thermometers such as a probe, infrared, paddle, etc.. I like and use them all when appropriate. But, I don't expect them to do miracles.

Second, I think much of this thread has a pedantic tone. For example, lack of cleanliness is one of the leading causes of foodborne illness. Simply washing our hands while working with food is one of the biggest things we can do to prevent foodborne illness. None of us - except the pedantic and the those with a mental condition such as ODC - wash our hands each and every time we get a product out of the refrigerator or pantry. Who knows how dirty those containers are? But, we handle them and accept the risk. Why? It takes too long. It would get excessive. It would be impractical. The amount of work and time it would take vs. the gain achieved would be far out of balance. In short, it would be crazy.

The same applies here. There are some foods that benefit from taking their active and/or final temperature. However, to imply that a "serious" cook needs this thermometer and a "serious" cook must temp foods within 1 - 2 degrees F accuracy or else their food will be far from great is, well . . . crazy.

If someone is cooking something (and there are times - but they are very, very, very rare - as in, almost never) that requires an extremely precise final temperature (as in literally within 1 - 2 degrees F), then they will most likely be using an $800 - $3,000 sous vide machine, not the stove top or oven.

It sounds like Thermoworks' marketing team has infiltrated this thread. I appreciate the enthusiasm of some here, but step back from your emotion and possible post-purchase rationalization and please be more honest and forthcoming and practical with your fellow cook who might be on the fence about buying this thermometer.

Back to sreeves3's post I quoted, learning to use our eyes, ears, and our sense of touch goes a long way in the kitchen. A thermometer is a good tool to use in many instances. However, to imply that "serious" cooks (whatever a "serious cook" is - I guess as opposed to the joking, playful cook) constantly use a thermometer and that thermometer must be a Thermapen is absurd.

I encourage some of you home cooks with little or no restaurant experience, to step into the kitchens of the top steakhouses in the country: Peter Luger, Bern's, Sparks, etc. and notice that the cooks don't temp their steaks with a thermometer - they temp them by touching them.

Thermometers are rarely used in restaurants to temp final temps in food. In practice, it's more the exception than the rule. Partly because it takes too much time and overwhelmingly because they don't need to. How does the Ritz-Carlton turn out consistently great food? Experience, looking, smelling, feeling, listening, and tasting. Yes, they employ thermometers, but overwhelmingly not instant-reads to temp final temps. So, top, top food can be produced without taking it's temperature.

Who temps their scrambled eggs except someone who takes a pedantic approach to cooking? Simply learn how to use the knobs on your stove and learn what to look for. In short order, you'll nail them every time.

For those who are on the fence about this thermometer: Can this thermometer help turn out better food? For many, yes - especially those with not as much experience in the kitchen. Is this the only thermometer that can do that? No. Is this thermometer a necessity for turning out great food? Of course not. Are there other, cheaper thermometers that can get the job done, but maybe not as fast? Yes, and here's one: another instant read by Thermoworks for $19 + shipping that was rated number one by Cook's Illustrated in their test of "Inexpensive Instant-Read Thermometers" [thermoworks.com].

Am I saying that thermometers, this one in particular, don't have their place in the kitchen? Am I saying they're a waste of money? Am I saying that you should not get one? No way. What I am saying, though, is know their place, know their limitations, and please don't try to convince other unknowing cooks that this Thermapen is a necessity in their kitchen.

I'm not making a blanket statement to not get this Thermapen. I am, however, trying to convince some out there to know why they're getting this Thermapen. If you don't know why you should get this Thermapen or, even after reading all of these posts, you're still unsure if you should or not, you probably aren't going to benefit much from it. You may want to skip it and get a cheaper alternative like the one I posted above.

I think all too often companies market, and many people believe, that a certain tool, gadget, or piece of equipment is going to magically make them a better cook. Hogwash. There is no substitute for being a good cook. Big Green Egg is one of the first examples that come to mind. If I don't know how to smoke, the BGE won't magically revolutionize my smoking. If I don't understand temperature control and the proper application of heat, the BGE won't do anything for me. The BGE doesn't do anything without me. It will only sit there on my back patio until I do something with it. If I can't smoke, the BGE is only going to be a really, really expensive way for me to turn out crappy smoked food. That being said, don't buy this thermometer thinking it alone is going to revolutionize or be some magic bullet for your cooking - it won't.

The first thing we need to know in order for any thermometer to do us any good is . . . what temperature we're looking for. How many of us know what temperatures certain meats, fish, bread, and other foods should be cooked to? My guess is not many. Most of us have been told that we just cook chicken breasts to 165 degrees F. Then, we get this thermometer all excited about how much better our food is going to be. Using our instant-read we cook a chicken breast to 165 degrees F exactly. We feel smug. We now feel much better about spending that $75 because our chicken is exactly 165 degrees F and our neighbor who doesn't have an instant-read is eating yucky chicken, but ours is going to be amazing. All excited, we cut into that "perfectly" cooked chicken, put it in our mouth, and realize that . . . it's dry. What went wrong?! We have this fancy thermometer and we did everything we were supposed to do! Actually, we didn't. We didn't know what temperature we should be looking for. The thermometer did it's job perfectly - it simply told us the temperature. It was up to us to do the rest - before, during, and after. What we didn't know is that meat begins to have major water loss at 140 degrees F and 165 degrees F chicken breast meat is overcooked and relatively very dry.

Again, there is no substitute for being a good cook.

jeepingsurfing 01-19-2013 03:37 PM

I can now measure the temperature of my poop! Thank you SLICKDEALS!

bk_InAZ 01-19-2013 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56963270)
Actually, this is one of the most truthful statements in this entire thread.

First, I will say that I own this thermometer along with a host of other thermometers such as a probe, infrared, paddle, etc.. I like and use them all when appropriate. But, I don't expect them to do miracles.

Second, I think much of this thread has a pedantic tone. For example, lack of cleanliness is one of the leading causes of foodborne illness. Simply washing our hands while working with food is one of the biggest things we can do to prevent foodborne illness. None of us - except the pedantic and the those with a mental condition such as ODC - wash our hands each and every time we get a product out of the refrigerator or pantry. Who knows how dirty those containers are? But, we handle them and accept the risk. Why? It takes too long. It would get excessive. It would be impractical. The amount of work and time it would take vs. the gain achieved would be far out of balance. In short, it would be crazy.

The same applies here. There are some foods that benefit from taking their active and/or final temperature. However, to imply that a "serious" cook needs this thermometer and a "serious" cook must temp foods within 1 - 2 degrees F accuracy or else their food will be far from great is, well . . . crazy.

If someone is cooking something (and there are times - but they are very, very, very rare - as in, almost never) that requires an extremely precise final temperature (as in literally within 1 - 2 degrees F), then they will most likely be using an $800 - $3,000 sous vide machine, not the stove top or oven.

It sounds like Thermoworks' marketing team has infiltrated this thread. I appreciate the enthusiasm of some here, but step back from your emotion and possible post-purchase rationalization and please be more honest and forthcoming and practical with your fellow cook who might be on the fence about buying this thermometer.

Back to sreeves3's post I quoted, learning to use our eyes, ears, and our sense of touch goes a long way in the kitchen. A thermometer is a good tool to use in many instances. However, to imply that "serious" cooks (whatever a "serious cook" is - I guess as opposed to the joking, playful cook) constantly use a thermometer and that thermometer must be a Thermapen is absurd.

I encourage some of you home cooks with little or no restaurant experience, to step into the kitchens of the top steakhouses in the country: Peter Luger, Bern's, Sparks, etc. and notice that the cooks don't temp their steaks with a thermometer - they temp them by touching them.

Thermometers are rarely used in restaurants to temp final temps in food. In practice, it's more the exception than the rule. Partly because it takes too much time and overwhelmingly because they don't need to. How does the Ritz-Carlton turn out consistently great food? Experience, looking, smelling, feeling, listening, and tasting. Yes, they employ thermometers, but overwhelmingly not instant-reads to temp final temps. So, top, top food can be produced without taking it's temperature.

Who temps their scrambled eggs except someone who takes a pedantic approach to cooking? Simply learn how to use the knobs on your stove and learn what to look for. In short order, you'll nail them every time.

For those who are on the fence about this thermometer: Can this thermometer help turn out better food? For many, yes - especially those with not as much experience in the kitchen. Is this the only thermometer that can do that? No. Is this thermometer a necessity for turning out great food? Of course not. Are there other, cheaper thermometers that can get the job done, but maybe not as fast? Yes, and here's one: another instant read by Thermoworks for $19 + shipping that was rated number one by Cook's Illustrated in their test of "Inexpensive Instant-Read Thermometers" [thermoworks.com].

Am I saying that thermometers, this one in particular, don't have their place in the kitchen? Am I saying they're a waste of money? Am I saying that you should not get one? No way. What I am saying, though, is know their place, know their limitations, and please don't try to convince other unknowing cooks that this Thermapen is a necessity in their kitchen.

I'm not making a blanket statement to not get this Thermapen. I am, however, trying to convince some out there to know why they're getting this Thermapen. If you don't know why you should get this Thermapen or, even after reading all of these posts, you're still unsure if you should or not, you probably aren't going to benefit much from it. You may want to skip it and get a cheaper alternative like the one I posted above.

I think all too often companies market, and many people believe, that a certain tool, gadget, or piece of equipment is going to magically make them a better cook. Hogwash. There is no substitute for being a good cook. Big Green Egg is one of the first examples that come to mind. If I don't know how to smoke, the BGE won't magically revolutionize my smoking. If I don't understand temperature control and the proper application of heat, the BGE won't do anything for me. The BGE doesn't do anything without me. It will only sit there on my back patio until I do something with it. If I can't smoke, the BGE is only going to be a really, really expensive way for me to turn out crappy smoked food. That being said, don't buy this thermometer thinking it alone is going to revolutionize or be some magic bullet for your cooking - it won't.

The first thing we need to know in order for any thermometer to do us any good is . . . what temperature we're looking for. How many of us know what temperatures certain meats, fish, bread, and other foods should be cooked to? My guess is not many. Most of us have been told that we just cook chicken breasts to 165 degrees F. Then, we get this thermometer all excited about how much better our food is going to be. Using our instant-read we cook a chicken breast to 165 degrees F exactly. We feel smug. We now feel much better about spending that $75 because our chicken is exactly 165 degrees F and our neighbor who doesn't have an instant-read is eating yucky chicken, but ours is going to be amazing. All excited, we cut into that "perfectly" cooked chicken, put it in our mouth, and realize that . . . it's dry. What went wrong?! We have this fancy thermometer and we did everything we were supposed to do! Actually, we didn't. We didn't know what temperature we should be looking for. The thermometer did it's job perfectly - it simply told us the temperature. It was up to us to do the rest - before, during, and after. What we didn't know is that meat begins to have major water loss at 140 degrees F and 165 degrees F chicken breast meat is overcooked and relatively very dry.

Again, there is no substitute for being a good cook.

Brian1: From all of us EEs out here- thanks. Your post used actual facts and logic, and was informative. A fancy thermometer like this one will make you feel better just like having a Rolex makes you feel better than a Casio that keeps just about as good time for much less money (and usually has way more features).

I bought an el-cheapo electronic meat thermometer on eBay last month for 5 or 6 bucks. It reads accurately in less than 5 seconds (depending on the starting and ending temps), and is accurate to about half a degree C. It has a few added features (Hold, Min/Max, C/F) that I will probably never use. It even came with a clear tubular case to keep it clean and ready for use in the kitchen drawer. I have designed temperature sensors for process control and industrial automation, so I have a fair idea of what's involved. And that's why I didn't need to spend $70-$100 extra to make myself feel good.

If you're making candy or confections a very good (accurate, and fairly responsive) thermometer is essential. My el-cheapo eBay one is just fine for that (it's fast and accurate enough by an order of magnitude each). When cooking meat (especially grilling), seasoned pros seldom use a thermometer at all, and they get consistently good results because they're experienced experts. For casual cooks or serious hobbyists a good thermometer need not be a very expensive one. If you know your equipment, and know what you're doing, you'll get great results.

Danzilla 01-19-2013 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56959054)
Some things are worth having speed and accuracy. As I posted before, if you are baking bread or cooking medium-rare steaks, it is worth it. If you're testing the core temperature of your frozen pot pie, probably not. The video previously posted does a great job of comparing them to the more affordable retail thermometers.

http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2...e-testing/

I can understand coming into a thread and either 1 - pointing out a lower price somewhere else, or evidence of better sales previously. or 2- first hand accounts of the product and how it isn't worth it. I don't necessarily understand the purpose of posts like yours. A summary would be "I have no use for this item, nor do I want to pay for it." It adds very little to the discussion.

Except I didn't say I have no use for this or don't want to pay that much for it. I would buy it if it had significant advantage over the thermistor models I already have (which it doesn't (for home use)). I essential said (or meant to) that I don't understand why someone needs to pay this much for the limited added benefit this device provides over the much less expensive, but still very functional ones also available.
I posted for the same reason I read the thread, because I was trying to understand the perceived benefit of buying this item.
And seriously, what home cook needs to check the temperature on their steaks unless they're new to cooking? :P I use my probes a good bit, but not for steaks.

PS. About that video, don't think they chose 0 degrees as the testing point by accident. Thermistors work by passing a current through a resistor... essentially creating heat. A more realistic demonstration would be with boiling water rather than freezing, as the main purpose for most for us is to measure HOT food, not cold.

Quote:

Originally Posted by bk_InAZ (Post 56963980)
Brian1: From all of us EEs out here- thanks. Your post used actual facts and logic, and was informative. A fancy thermometer like this one will make you feel better just like having a Rolex makes you feel better than a Casio that keeps just about as good time for much less money (and usually has way more features).
...

That's what I was thinking, but I wasn't sure. I believe there are some people that really need the added accuracy and speed of the Thermapen, but most people here just buy them because they're the fancy gadgets that people just enjoy owning. Not something they actually need significantly over a $20 model.

24kt 01-19-2013 05:47 PM

Love mine. Thanks for sharing

bobma 01-19-2013 06:26 PM

money doesn't grow on trees. If it did, then I would be this instrument. but not a refurb!

soulman295 01-19-2013 08:08 PM

Hm, I can see that it's added to my cart, but I can't checkout. It seems the link it broken at the top. Anyone else have this?

EDIT: It seemed to not like Chrome for me, dunno for anyone else. Switched to IE and worked fine.

virx14 01-19-2013 08:16 PM

Wow, I did not even know there are food thermometers like this. Will stick with one I bought on meritline.com for $1.99 incl shipping, been working great for me for 2 years. I only use it for BBQ once a week, I am not a serious cook. Still TU this thread for educational value!

elohel 01-19-2013 08:29 PM

For the men and women in this thread really serious about cooking to the absolute perfect temperature, I would recommend looking into sous vide cooking. Specifically, I bought the DorkFoods sous-vide temp controller on amazon and it's amazing. I haven't had such succulent, perfectly cooked chicken, steak, eggs, etc in a long time.

mike808 01-19-2013 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by virx14 (Post 56967330)
Will stick with one I bought on meritline.com for $1.99 incl shipping

I got this one because it comes in a purty teal color. That, and if I use it every day, I will get the cost-per-read under $0.25 in only three years!

Worth it! TU!

SuperSkerple 01-19-2013 08:50 PM

I like how this thread went from being "for" the thermapen to almost being against it.

Mechfire 01-19-2013 09:27 PM

I'm really glad so many people know what this is. Absolutely fantastic and must have for anyone that likes to cook. You could pay $30ish for a "fancy" one that really doesnt work, but one time with this and youll never look back.

frikinelmo 01-19-2013 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuperSkerple (Post 56967860)
I like how this thread went from being "for" the thermapen to almost being against it.

I'm always baffled by the amount of "anti-product" posts a sale price can bring out. People react as though they are being told they MUST purchase a product vs "here's a cheap price on a product if you are in the market for it."

frikinelmo 01-19-2013 09:32 PM

Also, it tends to be this way with items that are considered "higher end." Fancy knives, blendtec vs vitamix...a $76 thermometer. All have cheaper options. Not interested...move on? Nope. Try to prove your superior thriftiness by posting 700 word manifestos.

rlb4 01-19-2013 10:02 PM

It seems like the only real world difference between the Thermapen and the ThermoWorks RT600C and CDNDTQ450X is about 3-5 sec in response time?

TexasFlood 01-19-2013 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rlb4 (Post 56968844)
It seems like the only real world difference between the Thermapen and the ThermoWorks RT600C and CDNDTQ450X is about 3-5 sec in response time?

Love my Thermapen. I'm impatient and yesterday checked l multiple points (like 10 hah) on a chicken roast very quickly. Waiting 5 seconds at each point would have been tolerable but noticeable. Oh, and ONE, only ONE, of those points was under safe temp (150F rather than 165). Speaking of which, now I want leftover chicken so gotta go, :D

amwong21 01-19-2013 11:26 PM

In for one. Thanks!

TheCoffeePrince 01-19-2013 11:59 PM

For those of you buying a meat thermometer, make sure you calibrate/verify it first before using. You can do that by putting ice into a cup, wait for it to start to just melt, then put your thermometer to see if it registers something near 0 degree C. Last time I bought a meat thermometer for $20, it was about 10 degree C off when i was measuring ice water.

VladC 01-20-2013 12:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by creuset (Post 56940802)
Thank you! I've always wanted one of these well reviewed items (well liked by cooksillustrated). But they were too expensive. At $74.99 it's not necessarily cheap, but with slickdeals I'm assured that it is at least a great value. Thank you for the heads up on this insider deal.

This is not an insider deal, the overhyped thermometer thing is not a great value, and you are not an independent peer but a paid marketologist under disguise.

Sassan 01-20-2013 12:53 AM

Again, remember there is a huge differece between QUALITY and SAFETY.

Here is the official government guide to temps:
http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/ch...ntemp.html


Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56955084)
I wasn't suggesting that the final internal temperature of the breast needs to 165 degrees - that is a guaranteed way to have dry chicken meat. Instead, for very juicy breast meat, the final temperature after resting and after carryover does it's job should be 150 degrees F in the breast and 160 degrees F in the thigh. So, the bird should be pulled out of the oven before it hits 150 and 160 degrees F, respectively.

According to Harold McGee, the world's foremost food authority on food science, chemistry, and safety, poultry breast meat at 150 degrees F and leg meat at 160 degrees is perfectly safe to eat. Actually, both are safe to eat at just below 150 degrees F, but 160 degrees F in the leg meat yields a better textured product.

The government puts out their guidelines of 165 degrees F as a minimum (and a guaranteed way to yield dry poultry meat) not because that's truly the minimum safe temperature, but, rather, that's a temperature that's enough above the true minimum safe temperature that it will give enough of a buffer to keep the hundreds of millions of Americans who don't use a thermometer and those who might not be too bright a safety net so to speak. In other words, it's a catch-all temperature.

For those who properly use an accurate instant read or probe thermometer, a final internal temperature of 150 degrees in the breast meat and 160 degrees in the leg meat is perfectly safe to eat.

And this has been disputed and refuted many times by several university studies over the past several years per the Food Safety journals I receive.

Make sure your bird meat hits 165. I always cook to that temp and never have a dry bird. Just take your time.


By the way, a quick Google search yielded this:
Quote:

For the more delicate white meat, the desired temperature is 155 to 160 degrees F, and the tougher dark meat between 165-170 degrees F. Therefore, by starting to roast the breast meat colder than the dark meat, both will reach these desired temperatures at the same time and you will not overcook your bird. This also means a more juicy bird.
http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/t...rold-mcgee



Now, you may have read something else at some point, but it doesn't agree with what I just posted. **shrug**


{[UOTE=Brian1;56955184]To be clear, the vast majority of foodborne illnesses come from improper handling of food, not internal temperatures. So, cross-contamination, lack of cleanliness such as not washing hands, and holding food at dangerous temperatures should be our primary focus to help curb foodborne illnesses.[/QUOTE]

Number 1 reason: Dirty hands.
Number 2: Cross-contamination. One of the biggest reasons of cross-contamination? Probing a piece of meat that does not meet the internal cooking temp, not sanitizing the probe, then re-inserting later to check the temp again. BLEHHHH.


Quote:

Originally Posted by mjw_2 (Post 56957102)
You seem knowledge about the restaurant field. What thermocouple device would you recommend for measuring fried chicken legs and wings and the occasional washing machine check? I would something that is quick and easy to use and can withstand abuse.


Again, I will stand by Cooper-Atkins because that is all I have ever used, and they never failed me. $100 will get you a nice industrial one.



Quote:

Originally Posted by mike808 (Post 56960466)
As for the commercial ones mentioned, those are for commercial use where food safety is a laibility issue and getting the temp right is a big deal if you are in a restaurant. I don't think these are for that market. They are also priced for commercial use.

My point about the price......if you are going to spend $70 for a home one, spend an extra $30 and get a good, heavy duty industrial one that is not going to fail you. Well worth it.



Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56963270)

Second, I think much of this thread has a pedantic tone. For example, lack of cleanliness is one of the leading causes of foodborne illness. Simply washing our hands while working with food is one of the biggest things we can do to prevent foodborne illness. None of us - except the pedantic and the those with a mental condition such as ODC - wash our hands each and every time we get a product out of the refrigerator or pantry. Who knows how dirty those containers are? But, we handle them and accept the risk. Why? It takes too long. It would get excessive. It would be impractical. The amount of work and time it would take vs. the gain achieved would be far out of balance. In short, it would be crazy.

I will say I am slightly OCD, but when cooking, I wash my hands EVERY time I touch something, and I go through 5 million utensils while cooking because I never let anything cross. It adds an extra 3 minutes to my cooking. Big deal, well worth it.

Quote:

If someone is cooking something (and there are times - but they are very, very, very rare - as in, almost never) that requires an extremely precise final temperature (as in literally within 1 - 2 degrees F), then they will most likely be using an $800 - $3,000 sous vide machine, not the stove top or oven.
Or they are making sweets, i.e. chocolates, sugar-based products that need exact temps, etc.


Quote:


Thermometers are rarely used in restaurants to temp final temps in food. In practice, it's more the exception than the rule.
True, except you left out one fact that temps must be taken at least ONCE per day to assure that equipment and procedures are providing safe internal cooking temps to the food being served.

Quote:

The first thing we need to know in order for any thermometer to do us any good is . . . what temperature we're looking for. How many of us know what temperatures certain meats, fish, bread, and other foods should be cooked to?
Easy to remember:

Anything Poultry (including ground)/Leftovers/Microwaved food: 165
Anything Ground (except poultry): 155
Meats/Fish: 145
Anything ready-to-eat that you heat: 135


Four things. Print out a chart and leave it on your fridge. Easy to do.





We could go on and on and on about this......if you bought a thermometer, GREAT! Just make sure to calibrate it, use it, and clean between uses if your meat does not hit the minimum temps!!

Brian1 01-20-2013 02:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56970438)
Again, remember there is a huge differece between QUALITY and SAFETY.

Here is the official government guide to temps:
http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/ch...ntemp.html

And this has been disputed and refuted many times by several university studies over the past several years per the Food Safety journals I receive.

Make sure your bird meat hits 165. I always cook to that temp and never have a dry bird. Just take your time.

There isn't one particular temperature that bacteria is killed at. It's a function of time at a particular temperature - which is why it can be safe to eat chicken meat at 150 degrees F. Well, actually, held long enough, chicken can be safe from salmonella at 136 degrees F.

I think you're confusing "instant kill" temperatures with practical food safety temperatures.

I also think you're confusing the overarching, overly safe government recommendations for the entire population of the United States with actual food safety science. Here, the United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (a division of the USDA) [usda.gov], shows in exhaustive scientific detail, exactly how long chicken, turkey, and beef need to be held at a particular temperature to be safe from salmonella. Again, it's not just temperature that's important. It's time at a particular temperature that matters most.

As seen in the tables above, according to the FSIS of the USDA, chicken needs to be held at 150 degrees F for about 3 minutes to be safe from salmonella. In a real world kitchen, pulling a whole broiler/fryer chicken at an internal temperature in the breast of 147 degrees F will yield a safe chicken. Why? Because of carryover cooking. The internal temperature will continue to rise over the course of the next 5 - 10 minutes up to and past 150 degrees F. Then the temperature will stall. Then it will begin to fall. During this course, it will have been at and above 150 degrees F for longer than the required 3 minutes and, thus, be safe to eat.

That being said, the government's "official" food safety guide isn't going to be a scientific time/temperature table like the ones above. They're trying to advise the entire population of the United States. The government advocates guides that are overly and impractically conservative and oversimplified, thus the "instant kill" temperature charts they release. The population reads it and interprets it as absolute when it is far from it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56970438)
By the way, a quick Google search yielded this:
http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/t...rold-mcgee

Now, you may have read something else at some point, but it doesn't agree with what I just posted. **shrug**

From page 258 in Keys to Good Cooking by Harold McGee:

"Whole birds are a challenge to roast well. Their breast meat is low in connective tissue and best cooked to 150 degrees F/65 degrees C for chickens and turkeys, 135 degrees F/57 degrees C for duck and squab. But their leg meat is high in connective tissue and best cooked to 160 degrees F/70 degrees C, and their skin is best cooked to 350 degrees F/175 degrees C to make it crisp and brown."

MediumPimpin 01-20-2013 02:45 AM

Got one for my mom, she's been struggling with the meat lately, seasoned well but temps are either overcooked or rare.

Parafly 01-20-2013 01:54 PM

I'm on the fence. I want one. Every Christmas I do a 22 lb roast that costs upwards of $180 normally. Sometimes over $200. Every year it's a freak out session trying to know if I am at the right temp.

Brian1 01-20-2013 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Parafly (Post 56979462)
I'm on the fence. I want one. Every Christmas I do a 22 lb roast that costs upwards of $180 normally. Sometimes over $200. Every year it's a freak out session trying to know if I am at the right temp.

You need a probe thermometer for that.

Thermoworks' probe thermometer [thermoworks.com] is Cook's Illustrated's highest rated probe thermometer and it only costs about $25.

Parafly 01-20-2013 02:39 PM

This wouldn't work for a roast ?

Brian1 01-20-2013 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Parafly (Post 56980522)
This wouldn't work for a roast ?

It could, but you'll be opening the oven door or smoker a lot, thus creating a much less than great cooking environment for your expensive roast. It will be much easier and give you better results if you use a probe thermometer for this application.

bk_InAZ 01-20-2013 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56968408)
Also, it tends to be this way with items that are considered "higher end." Fancy knives, blendtec vs vitamix...a $76 thermometer. All have cheaper options. Not interested...move on? Nope. Try to prove your superior thriftiness by posting 700 word manifestos.

I'm sorry if my post came across that way. I think this is a very nice product. I am concerned that some people might think (A) it will make them a better cook, (B) a lower-priced option will necessarily produce inferior results. Funny, I went into the Sur-La-Table store here, looking for this item because it's what they use on America's Test Kitchen, a show I enjoy. They didn't carry it. I found a much less expensive one on eBay, and am surprised by how good it is. I just wanted to share the information for those who might benefit.

borrillo 01-20-2013 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56980242)
You need a probe thermometer for that.

Thermoworks' probe thermometer [thermoworks.com] is Cook's Illustrated's highest rated probe thermometer and it only costs about $25.


I hear you. We do a prime rib each Christmas and the last thing you want to do is over cook it! I use a probe thermometer and take it off the Weber @ 118 degrees. I take it off and cover it and let it get up to 130 degrees inside. In the mean time, I crank up the grill to high and bring the roast back out to the grill once it hits 130 inside. I let it get a nice crust for 5 min minutes and take it right off after that. Never had an issue following those steps.

Chef it Up!!

Great post! Been checking these out for years. Everyone on Food Network uses these... Alton Brown, Bobby Flay... you see them busted out on Iron Chef all the time. Now I'm an avid home cook, and even lead the kitchen team at our church retreats, but do I really need to spend this much money to get an "instant" read?? Yes, you stick it in, and its instant, vs waiting a few seconds for the other type to adjust. The same company makes other products for around $20 - $30 bucks. Now if I was loaded and had disposable income at hand, I'd jump on it, but just can't justify the extra money. Plenty of other nice ones to be had for half the price. my $0.02. Those that can afford it, its a great deal!! Enjoy it!!

Sassan 01-20-2013 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56971182)
There isn't one particular temperature that bacteria is killed at. It's a function of time at a particular temperature - which is why it can be safe to eat chicken meat at 150 degrees F. Well, actually, held long enough, chicken can be safe from salmonella at 136 degrees F.

I think you're confusing "instant kill" temperatures with practical food safety temperatures.

I also think you're confusing the overarching, overly safe government recommendations for the entire population of the United States with actual food safety science. Here, the United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (a division of the USDA) [usda.gov], shows in exhaustive scientific detail, exactly how long chicken, turkey, and beef need to be held at a particular temperature to be safe from salmonella. Again, it's not just temperature that's important. It's time at a particular temperature that matters most.

As seen in the tables above, according to the FSIS of the USDA, chicken needs to be held at 150 degrees F for about 3 minutes to be safe from salmonella. In a real world kitchen, pulling a whole broiler/fryer chicken at an internal temperature in the breast of 147 degrees F will yield a safe chicken. Why? Because of carryover cooking. The internal temperature will continue to rise over the course of the next 5 - 10 minutes up to and past 150 degrees F. Then the temperature will stall. Then it will begin to fall. During this course, it will have been at and above 150 degrees F for longer than the required 3 minutes and, thus, be safe to eat.

That being said, the government's "official" food safety guide isn't going to be a scientific time/temperature table like the ones above. They're trying to advise the entire population of the United States. The government advocates guides that are overly and impractically conservative and oversimplified, thus the "instant kill" temperature charts they release. The population reads it and interprets it as absolute when it is far from it.



From page 258 in Keys to Good Cooking by Harold McGee:

"Whole birds are a challenge to roast well. Their breast meat is low in connective tissue and best cooked to 150 degrees F/65 degrees C for chickens and turkeys, 135 degrees F/57 degrees C for duck and squab. But their leg meat is high in connective tissue and best cooked to 160 degrees F/70 degrees C, and their skin is best cooked to 350 degrees F/175 degrees C to make it crisp and brown."



And please go back and read my posts, where I said.......for at least 15 seconds.


Yes, it depends on how long your meat is at a given temperature.

Mermaid 01-20-2013 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Parafly (Post 56979462)
I'm on the fence. I want one. Every Christmas I do a 22 lb roast that costs upwards of $180 normally. Sometimes over $200. Every year it's a freak out session trying to know if I am at the right temp.

For a standing rib roast, you'd want to use a probe thermometer that alerts you when the temp reaches your target instead of opening the oven and poking multiple holes in your roast.

The last time I did a standing rib roast, I pulled it at 115 degrees and it was absolutely perfect after it rested. It would have been better if I had aged it for 3 weeks instead of 1 but it was the first time I dry aged anything that expensive ($227) and I didn't want to screw it up. :lol: Of course, a couple of my stupid guests asked that theirs be grilled to well done, so they will never be invited to such a glorious meal again. Idiots. :lmao:

Edited to add that I somehow missed the entire last page of this thread and the suggestion to use a probe thermometer had already been made several times. Oops! :D

VladC 01-20-2013 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56968354)
I'm always baffled by the amount of "anti-product" posts a sale price can bring out. People react as though they are being told they MUST purchase a product vs "here's a cheap price on a product if you are in the market for it."

Only a paid marketer/promoter of its overpriced product could object to such useful tip and write like this.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brian1 (Post 56980242)
You need a probe thermometer for that.

Thermoworks' probe thermometer [thermoworks.com] is Cook's Illustrated's highest rated probe thermometer and it only costs about $25.

Maybe she needs more Prozac rather than more thermometer.

VladC 01-20-2013 07:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobma (Post 56965866)
money doesn't grow on trees. If it did, then I would be this instrument. but not a refurb!

No, not trees. Money grows in the dark cursed dungeons of the so-called Fed Reserve.

HunkaBurninLove 01-20-2013 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mermaid (Post 56985680)
For a standing rib roast, you'd want to use a probe thermometer that alerts you when the temp reaches your target instead of opening the oven and poking multiple holes in your roast.

The last time I did a standing rib roast, I pulled it at 115 degrees and it was absolutely perfect after it rested. It would have been better if I had aged it for 3 weeks instead of 1 but it was the first time I dry aged anything that expensive ($227) and I didn't want to screw it up. :lol: Of course, a couple of my stupid guests asked that theirs be grilled to well done, so they will never be invited to such a glorious meal again. Idiots. :lmao:

Edited to add that I somehow missed the entire last page of this thread and the suggestion to use a probe thermometer had already been made several times. Oops! :D

Agree that a probe thermometer is the best bet for that. $25 is a small price to pay for a rib roast that large. You leave it in and just monitor the temp without opening the oven door.

A probe thermometer is a small price to pay and you'll use it for other things.

frikinelmo 01-20-2013 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VladC (Post 56985784)
Only a paid marketer/promoter of its overpriced product could object to such useful tip and write like this.

Did the black helicopters circling your compound tell you to say this? :lmao:

Quote:

Originally Posted by bk_InAZ (Post 56984828)
I'm sorry if my post came across that way. I think this is a very nice product. I am concerned that some people might think (A) it will make them a better cook, (B) a lower-priced option will necessarily produce inferior results. Funny, I went into the Sur-La-Table store here, looking for this item because it's what they use on America's Test Kitchen, a show I enjoy. They didn't carry it. I found a much less expensive one on eBay, and am surprised by how good it is. I just wanted to share the information for those who might benefit.

I can't disagree with any of that. :)

VladC 01-20-2013 09:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56986238)
Did the black helicopters circling your compound tell you to say this? :lmao:

No, actually it was Zetas, or maybe Orions, or was it Greys, who gave this secret Super-priced Thermo(tm) technology to your employer and who wants their royalty paid in human blood (or brains?), that's why so few of the latter is left... hey, you can use this gimmick for your next marketing ploy!

frikinelmo 01-20-2013 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VladC (Post 56988320)
No, actually it was Zetas, or maybe Orions, or was it Greys, who gave this secret Super-priced Thermo(tm) technology to your employer and who wants their royalty paid in human blood (or brains?), that's why so few of the latter is left... hey, you can use this gimmick for your next marketing ploy!

Crazy as a shithouse rat paranoia and asinine trolling posts? I'll leave that to you and the other experts in your bunker.

VladC 01-20-2013 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frikinelmo (Post 56989300)
Crazy as a shithouse rat paranoia and asinine trolling posts? I'll leave that to you and the other experts in your bunker.

So that's the intelligence level of your bunker? Acknowledged.

denisiel 01-20-2013 11:41 PM

Tempted to buy as have been waiting for a good deal on a Thermapen. But the fact that some are refurbished also makes me think they must fail a lot to be returned and then refurbished. It's not a very big discount to entice me to buy a broken then repaired item. Will wait for a sale on a new Thermapen.

TheCoffeePrince 01-21-2013 01:25 AM

tbh, any thermometer would work fine. As a matter of fact, I have a walmart thermometer right now and when I calibrated for the first time, it gave a pretty accurate reading. I have had this thermometer for the past few years and I calibrate it every week. You don't really need an expensive thermometer, just learn to calibrate your equipments.

bluejen 01-21-2013 02:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elohel (Post 56967544)
For the men and women in this thread really serious about cooking to the absolute perfect temperature, I would recommend looking into sous vide cooking. Specifically, I bought the DorkFoods sous-vide temp controller on amazon and it's amazing. I haven't had such succulent, perfectly cooked chicken, steak, eggs, etc in a long time.

I thought you were joking about the DorkFood so I had to look it up. Just when you think you've heard it all! :lmao:

Parafly 01-21-2013 08:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mermaid (Post 56985680)
For a standing rib roast, you'd want to use a probe thermometer that alerts you when the temp reaches your target instead of opening the oven and poking multiple holes in your roast.

The last time I did a standing rib roast, I pulled it at 115 degrees and it was absolutely perfect after it rested. It would have been better if I had aged it for 3 weeks instead of 1 but it was the first time I dry aged anything that expensive ($227) and I didn't want to screw it up. :lol: Of course, a couple of my stupid guests asked that theirs be grilled to well done, so they will never be invited to such a glorious meal again. Idiots. :lmao:

Edited to add that I somehow missed the entire last page of this thread and the suggestion to use a probe thermometer had already been made several times. Oops! :D


I have a probe thermometer also but I use three of them and all three read different temps. PUlled at 115 as well usually, but one thermometer says 120, another one says 108, and one says 115, it's like ... WTH is it really?

Mermaid 01-21-2013 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Parafly (Post 56995714)
I have a probe thermometer also but I use three of them and all three read different temps. PUlled at 115 as well usually, but one thermometer says 120, another one says 108, and one says 115, it's like ... WTH is it really?

It is time to calibrate them. :) http://foodsafety.unl.edu/haccp/h...alibration

grihm 01-21-2013 02:00 PM

Thank OP, i'm in for one. Take that you luxury thermometer haters!

elohel 01-21-2013 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JennyQ (Post 56991718)
I thought you were joking about the DorkFood so I had to look it up. Just when you think you've heard it all! :lmao:

No way :D I got into sous vide cooking after I went to a cooking event and had literally the best chicken, steak, and short rib of my life. Sous vide cookers are unfortunately like $400+, but the DorkFood unit was about $120 ($100 for the controller, $20 for the crock pot it regulates).

Normally I wouldn't plug a product like this, but I've just been ridiculously impressed with it. Holds temps to around .3*F or so, which is ridiculous accurate IMO for controlling a clunky crock pot. The first few times it regulates the temp swings it goes above and below a few degrees, but after about 10 minutes it figures out the heat curve changes and keeps it steady. Really awesome

TexasFlood 01-21-2013 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sassan (Post 56970438)
Make sure your bird meat hits 165. I always cook to that temp and never have a dry bird. Just take your time.

I agree. Find my birds acceptable at that temperature. These days a carnivore has to consider not just considering salmonella but also nasty stuff like influenza, avian influenza, campylobacter, e coli, listeria, staphylococcus aureus, and who knows what else. Given all that, I'm ok sticking to 165F perhaps sacrificing a tad of extra moisture, :D

TexasFlood 01-21-2013 05:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elohel (Post 57010782)
No way :D I got into sous vide cooking after I went to a cooking event and had literally the best chicken, steak, and short rib of my life. Sous vide cookers are unfortunately like $400+, but the DorkFood unit was about $120 ($100 for the controller, $20 for the crock pot it regulates).

Normally I wouldn't plug a product like this, but I've just been ridiculously impressed with it. Holds temps to around .3*F or so, which is ridiculous accurate IMO for controlling a clunky crock pot. The first few times it regulates the temp swings it goes above and below a few degrees, but after about 10 minutes it figures out the heat curve changes and keeps it steady. Really awesome

Thanks for the info, never heard of this, living under a rock maybe, hah. Going to read up on it

elohel 01-21-2013 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TexasFlood (Post 57014628)
Thanks for the info, never heard of this, living under a rock maybe, hah. Going to read up on it

I hadn't heard about it until maybe a month ago. Now every meat and vege I cook is inside a plastic bag submerged in water :D

SlickCanon 01-22-2013 12:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by denisiel (Post 56990624)
Tempted to buy as have been waiting for a good deal on a Thermapen. But the fact that some are refurbished also makes me think they must fail a lot to be returned and then refurbished. It's not a very big discount to entice me to buy a broken then repaired item. Will wait for a sale on a new Thermapen.

The vast majority of "refurbished" items were never broken to begin with and in fact many of them have never even been used. They usually come from dented boxes, seller overstock, customer returns and canceled orders. Anything that leaves the warehouse can no longer legally be sold as new.

Refurbished are sometimes even better than new because the manufacturer spends more time testing the product than one straight off the assembly line (where they usually only test a small percentage of the batch). You can pretty much be sure your refurbished product was individually inspected and verified.

D1337 01-22-2013 12:30 AM

Can i stick this into a dead person and determine when they died like they do on CSI?

bd75 01-22-2013 09:09 AM

Grabbed a red one over the weekend. Thanks OP, repped!

MSG123 01-22-2013 04:03 PM

Ok, just got mine! Initial impressions, really cool. However, I'm not that impressed with the battery access port. The plastic is easily damaged. Anyways, how does it compare to my other $14 TruTemp IR thermometer?

It is fast, but to be frank, it's not much faster than the cheaper thermometer. In fact, it took longer than the purported claim of 3 seconds to measure boiling water. Probably took closer to 8-10 seconds, whereas it took the TruTemp not much longer than that to get an pretty accurate reading. Was it worth the $70+ bucks? In hindsight, no. Oh well, I wonder if I can return it.

j0dan 01-22-2013 05:07 PM

I own both the CDN DTQ450X and the Thermapen.

They are both very accurate, just the CDN one takes an extra 2-3 seconds to give the current temperature.

MSG123 01-22-2013 06:17 PM

Ok, been doing more tests. Ok, yeah, the Thermapen is much faster and much more responsive than the TruTemp IR thermometer for boiling water. It got up to 211F in around 3 seconds. My TruTemp IR thermometer took well over 10 seconds to get near 208F.

I'm gonna do more tests with ice baths. So far, yeah, it's much better.

SlickCanon 01-22-2013 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MSG123 (Post 57046130)
Ok, been doing more tests. Ok, yeah, the Thermapen is much faster and much more responsive than the TruTemp IR thermometer for boiling water. It got up to 211F in around 3 seconds. My TruTemp IR thermometer took well over 10 seconds to get near 208F.

I'm gonna do more tests with ice baths. So far, yeah, it's much better.

Are you sure that's not your mind trying to justify the purchase? ;)

Mine's coming on Friday, hope I'm not disappointed...

MSG123 01-22-2013 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlickCanon (Post 57050208)
Are you sure that's not your mind trying to justify the purchase? ;)

Mine's coming on Friday, hope I'm not disappointed...

Yeah, I think it's good. I was showing my wife the difference, and she thought it was quite noticeable. It also has a very long probe, which is nice. And a thin tip which worked really well for some chicken I had on the grill today. However, I did an ice bath test, and in 3-4 seconds, the probe read 33F. Compared to the TruTemp, however, it is MUCH faster. The TruTemp took 12 seconds to get down to 33F. Regardless, this isn't what ThermoWorks claim. They said that from 70F, the ThermaPen will read 32F in under 3 seconds. That hasn't been the case for me.

Still, it makes me wonder if it's worth 5x the price of a regular IR thermometer. Oh well. YOLO. :bounce:

VladC 01-22-2013 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlickCanon (Post 57050208)
Are you sure that's not your mind trying to justify the purchase? ;)

Mine's coming on Friday, hope I'm not disappointed...

Mine $19.95 Harbor Freight Infrared Thermometer with Laser Guide takes 1-2 seconds to do the same.

theleonlion 01-22-2013 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VladC (Post 57051896)
Mine $19.95 Harbor Freight Infrared Thermometer with Laser Guide takes 1-2 seconds to do the same.

Surface temperature is rarely important in cooking.

VladC 01-23-2013 12:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theleonlion (Post 57052040)
Surface temperature is rarely important in cooking.

Surface temperature always correlates to inner one. That's all a good chef needs.

asdf916 01-23-2013 01:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VladC (Post 57052456)
Surface temperature always correlates to inner one. That's all a good chef needs.

i can't tell if there's sarcasm in that statement

VladC 01-23-2013 01:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by asdf916 (Post 57052514)
i can't tell if there's sarcasm in that statement

Then my level of sarcasm has achieved a new height.

SlickCanon 01-23-2013 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VladC (Post 57051896)
Mine $19.95 Harbor Freight Infrared Thermometer with Laser Guide takes 1-2 seconds to do the same.

Surface temp only correlates to inner temp if you cook the same thing over and over again in the same proportions on the same temperature skillet or oven. It's much easier with a probe.

stellah 01-23-2013 03:28 PM

been waiting to get one of these! finally! thanks!

thisonelies 01-23-2013 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VladC (Post 57052534)
Then my level of sarcasm has achieved a new height.

:lmao:

I've had many a chuckle reading this thread, but this concise distillation of wit was my favorite! I only lament my inability to rep you

VladC 01-24-2013 01:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thisonelies (Post 57077432)
I only lament my inability to rep you

Sorry, I don't believe in Repertoire.

cstitt 01-25-2013 12:08 PM

Couldn't have come at a better time. Still a lot of colors left too (red is sold out, so I went with blue). Thanks OP

louiemingione 01-25-2013 12:12 PM

Just got mine today and it came with a pack of Jelly Belly jelly beans! If you were on the fence, maybe that will sweeten the deal. ;)

tonkatsu 01-25-2013 07:23 PM

If this is such a great deal, and if it's so rare for them to this kind of sale, why is every single color still available like 4 days later?


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